The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Archimago (The Sire) Character Analysis

Archimago (originally introduced as “the Sire”) is an evil wizard who specializes in deception. He causes problems in Book I when he tricks the Redcross Knight into believing that his lady Una has become lusty and unfaithful to him, causing him to leave without her. He reappears near the end of Book I but is foiled again by Redcross.
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Archimago (The Sire) Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Archimago (The Sire) appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book I: Canto I
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
...lovely lady and rides back the way they came. Eventually, they come upon an old Sire in long black clothes, with a long beard and a book hanging around his belt. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
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The Sire salutes the Redcross Knight. He begins to tell the knight of a nearby evil creature,... (full context)
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Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The old Sire lives in a humble home in a dale by the edge of the forest, not... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Archimago sends two sprites in particular to trouble the Redcross Knight in his sleep. One sprite... (full context)
Book I: Canto II
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
The sprites go back to their master, Archimago, and report their failure. Archimago transforms one of the sprites to look like a young... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...the squire, entwined together in bed, and he nearly slays them but is restrained by Archimago. He goes back to his own bed in torment, and at dawn, he and the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
...She tries to catch up with them in vain. With Una alone in the woods, Archimago sees an opportunity. The crafty sorcerer decides to disguise himself as the Redcross Knight. (full context)
Book I: Canto III
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
...finds a knight whom she believes to be the Redcross Knight but who is actually Archimago in disguise. Una approaches him, weeping and asking where he’s been. She says she was... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Archimago (disguised as the Redcross Knight) tells Una that he left her to go on an... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
Suddenly, Una and Archimago (disguised as the Redcross Knight) are approached by a fierce, sweaty rider with Sans loy... (full context)
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sansloy gets off his horse and promises to kill the Redcross Knight (who is actually Archimago in disguise) for what he did to his brother Sansfoy. Una pleads for Sansloy not... (full context)
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British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
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Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sansloy asks Archimago what he’s doing there. But Archimago is in a daze, so he doesn’t reply. Sansloy... (full context)
Book I: Canto VI
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After defeating Archimago (who had been disguised as the Redcross Knight), Sansloy takes Una with him. He tries... (full context)
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...out of the woods with him, onto a plain. There they see a weary pilgrim (Archimago), whom they approach to ask for news about the Redcross Knight. The pilgrim carries a... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Sansloy, replies that he never slew the Redcross Knight but in fact only struck down Archimago. Nevertheless, Satyrane and Sansloy begin to fight, going at each other as fiercely as two... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
...with more attacks, allowing Una to escape. However, the pilgrim, who turns out to be Archimago in disguise, chases after her. (full context)
Book I: Canto VII
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...three times. The dwarf tells her about how the knight was misled by Duessa and Archimago and how he was captured and taken away by Orgoglio the giant. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
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...loved the Redcross Knight, but she was separated from him due to the tricks of Archimago, who made the knight doubt her faithfulness and ride off. Having finished her tale, Una... (full context)
Book II: Canto I
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...Redcross Knight returned to faerie land and Una living happily in Eden waiting for him, Archimago begins plotting his next move. But Redcross is used to Archimago’s tricks by now and... (full context)
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...traveling to faerie land with King Oberon and a Palmer (pilgrim on a religious trip). Archimago disguises himself as a squire and approaches them politely to try to deceive them. He... (full context)
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Protestantism Theme Icon
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
Archimago and Duessa met up while Duessa was wandering naked in the woods after being defeated... (full context)
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Archimago provokes Sir Guyon to try attacking the Redcross Knight, but soon the two knights begin... (full context)
Book II: Canto III
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In their travels, Braggadochio and Trompart run into Archimago. Archimago figures Braggadochio must be a grand knight who would be familiar with the Redcross... (full context)
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Archimago advises Braggadochio to get a proper sword in order to slay the Redcross Knight and... (full context)
Book II: Canto VI
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...his master from drowning. As Atin is struggling, he looks ashore and happens to see Archimago, whom he asks for help. (full context)
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Pyrochles tells Archimago that Furor is the one who made him burn with unquenchable flames. Archimago knows this... (full context)
Book II: Canto VIII
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...then he happens to notice that Pyrochles and Cymochles are on their way over, with Archimago and Atin as well. Pyrochles and Cymochles confront the Palmer about Guyon and all the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
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...coming: Arthur. Pyrochles doesn’t have his own sword, since he has been using Arthur’s (which Archimago procured for him), and Archimago warns him that the sword might not work against its... (full context)
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...who were trying to steal Guyon’s things. Guyon is very grateful for Arthur’s help. Meanwhile, Archimago and Atin flee the scene quickly. (full context)
Book III: Canto IV
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While tending to Marinell, the nymphs curse whoever injured him. Meanwhile Archimago the evil wizard has been stalking Britomart ever since she left Arthur and Sir Guyon... (full context)