The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Marinell Character Analysis

Marinell is a knight who lives by the sea and who has been told by his mother, the nymph Cymoent, to avoid women because one will be his downfall. But he is quick to pick fights and challenges Britomart, not realizing (because she’s wearing armor) that she is a woman. Marinell ends up badly wounded. Eventually, he recovers and ends up marrying the fair maiden Florimell in a grand ceremony held at the house of Proteus.

Marinell Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Marinell or refer to Marinell. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book III: Canto IV Quotes

Who through foresight of his eternall skill,
Bad her from womankind to keepe him well:
For of a woman he should have much ill,
A virgin strange and stout him should dismay, or kill.

Related Characters: Marinell, Proteus, Florimell, Britomart, Cymoent
Page Number: 438
Explanation and Analysis:
Book III: Canto VIII Quotes

Now when the Beast, which by her wicked art
Late forth she sent, she backe returning spyde,
Tyde with her broken girdle, it a part
Of her rich spoyles, whom he had earst destroyd,
She weend, and woundrous gladnesse to her hart applyde.

Related Characters: Florimell, Sir Satyrane, Marinell, Venus
Related Symbols: Florimell’s Gold Belt
Page Number: 492
Explanation and Analysis:
Book IV: Canto I Quotes

Of lovers sad calamities of old,
Full many piteous stories doe remaine,
But none more piteous ever was ytold,
Then that of Amorets hart-binding chaine,
And this of Florimels unworthie paine

Page Number: 383
Explanation and Analysis:
Book IV: Canto XII Quotes

Right so himself did Marinell upreare,
When he in place his dearst love did spy;
And though his limbs could not his bodie beare,
Ne former strength return so suddenly,
Yet chearefull signes he shewed outwardly.

Related Characters: Marinell, Florimell, Britomart, Proteus
Page Number: 721
Explanation and Analysis:
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Marinell Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Marinell appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book III: Canto IV
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...she ends up wounding the knight with her enchanted spear. The knight, whose name is Marinell, lies bleeding on the shore, which is strewn with precious objects. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Marinell is the son of a nymph named Cymoent and had previously subdued a hundred other... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Proteus warned Marinell’s mother, Cymoent, that her son should stay away from women because one will grievously injure... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Back in the present, sea creatures and nymphs, including Cymoent, come to witness Marinell looking nearly dead. Neptune, the god of the sea, is himself amazed at the display... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
While tending to Marinell, the nymphs curse whoever injured him. Meanwhile Archimago the evil wizard has been stalking Britomart... (full context)
Book III: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Florimell, according to the dwarf, is in love with the knight Marinell, but news has just come that Marinell has potentially been slain (he hasn’t, although Britomart... (full context)
Book III: Canto VIII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...as Paridell, based on the colors of his crest. Paridell tells of the ruin of Marinell and of the sudden departure of Florimell, whom all the knights in court are searching... (full context)
Book IV: Canto XI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...a dungeon so dark that she couldn’t tell night from day, all because she loved Marinell (the knight by the shore), who doesn’t love any woman (because he was told a... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Marinell is still suffering from a wound that Britomart gave him during their battle. His mother... (full context)
Book IV: Canto XII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Proteus’s house, the narrator says he left off several names. At the wedding is also Marinell’s mother the nymph Cymoent (also sometimes called Cymodoce), but Marinell’s father is mortal and so... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...the god who is keeping her prisoner. She wishes that she could see her love, Marinell, again. Marinell hears this and realizes he’s been hard-hearted toward Florimell. He decides to break... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Marinell tries to think of a way to help Florimell but no matter what option he... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Marinell begins to wither away, losing his strength, which upsets his mother. She doesn’t know the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Apollo says that whatever ails Marinell is in his mind and that it’s probably love. Cymoent is upset about this at... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Proteus doesn’t dare contradict an order from Neptune, and so he lets Florimell go. Marinell sees Florimell, and immediately his heavy heart is lifted. He is weak from his period... (full context)
Book V: Canto III
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The day of Florimell and Marinell’s wedding arrives. It’s a glorious feast where everyone eats until they’re full. There is a... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...brings out false Florimell, covered with a veil, which shocks and confuses the crowd. Even Marinell wonders if the false Florimell might be the true one. (full context)
Book V: Canto IV
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthegall leaves Florimell and Marinell’s wedding festivities. As he travels, he meets two handsome squires who are twin brothers. In... (full context)