The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Faerie Queene can help.

Orgoglio Character Analysis

Orgoglio is an evil giant who schemes with Duessa and who defeats a weakened Redcross Knight in battle, taking him prisoner in his dungeon. Though Orgoglio is a powerful and proud fighter, Prince Arthur manages to defeat him in battle, and when Orgoglio dies, all that remains is an empty bladder—showing how empty Orgoglio’s pride really was.
Get the entire The Faerie Queene LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Faerie Queene PDF

Orgoglio Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Orgoglio appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book I: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
All of a sudden, a giant named Orgoglio shows up and challenges the Redcross Knight. Being weakened, the Redcross Knight can’t get to... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Duessa suggests that instead, Orgoglio can claim the Redcross Knight as a prisoner and force him into service. Orgoglio agrees... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Meanwhile, the dwarf, who wasn’t noticed by Orgoglio but who saw what happened to the Redcross Knight, gathers up the knight’s scattered possessions... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...was misled by Duessa and Archimago and how he was captured and taken away by Orgoglio the giant. (full context)
Book I: Canto VIII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The dwarf, Una, and Prince Arthur ride until they reach Orgoglio the giant’s castle. They blow a horn at the gate, and Orgoglio leaves Duessa to... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Orgoglio is struck down so hard that his club gets stuck in the ground. While he... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Orgoglio the giant has recovered and comes charging at Prince Arthur. He brings his club down... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Duessa grieves to see the fall of Orgoglio. The squire captures her and brings her to Prince Arthur. Una thanks them for all... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
...The old man is Ignaro, and he acted as a kind of foster father to Orgoglio. Ignaro doesn’t answer Arthur’s questions about the keys, so at last, Arthur just takes them. (full context)
Book VI: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The rude man with Mirabella is a giant from the same house as Orgoglio (who was slain by Arthur in Book 1) named Disdain. He wields an iron club.... (full context)