The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Faerie Queene can help.
Sir Calepine is the knight of the lady Serena. When Serena is wounded by the Blatant Beast and Calepine tries to carry her across a river, Sir Turpine just watches them and laughs. He continues to have conflict with Sir Turpine until at last Arthur defeats the rude Turpine and takes away his knightly equipment.

Sir Calepine Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Sir Calepine or refer to Sir Calepine. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book VI: Canto VII Quotes

And after all, for greater infamie,
He by the heeles him hung upon a tree,
And baffuld so, that all which passed by,
The picture of his punishment might see,
And by the like ensample warned bee

Page Number: 956
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Faerie Queene LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Faerie Queene PDF

Sir Calepine Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Sir Calepine appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book VI: Canto III
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
As Calidore is riding, he sees a knight called Sir Calepine in the shade with his lady, Serena. They are both ashamed when they see Calidore... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Calepine is dismayed to see that Serena has bloody wounds from the beast. He puts Serena... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Calepine decides to try carrying Serena out into the river, using his spear as a walking... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The porter at the castle door is also rude and refuses to let Sir Calepine and Serena inside. The porter replies that the lord of the castle, Sir Turpine, only... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The next day, Serena looks feeble, and Sir Calepine is concerned. Calepine is angry and wants revenge, but for Serena’s sake, he rides on... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
While Calepine is angry with Sir Turpine, he doesn’t want to fight because he needs to help... (full context)
Book VI: Canto IV
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Calepine and Serena’s fortune has been like the fortune of a sailor caught at sea and... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The savage man comes back to Sir Calepine and Serena. He can’t talk but uses gestures to indicate that he wants to help.... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
When Sir Calepine gets back his strength, he goes out wandering in the woods without his weapon or... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Calepine stays strong as the bear tries to attack him. He shoves a stone down its... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Outside the forest, Sir Calepine runs into a sad-looking woman named Matilda. Her husband, Bruin, recently conquered the surrounding lands... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Calepine replies that he actually has the perfect solution to their problem, since he just found... (full context)
Book VI: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...noble blood. He feels sorry for Serena’s poor condition, so he goes searching for Sir Calepine. He comes back to her one time and mimes choking (to show Calepine’s fight with... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Having lost hope that Sir Calepine will return, Serena wanders off. The savage man doesn’t want her to go alone, so... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
One day, however, the savage man is adjusting some equipment on Sir Calepine’s horse, and Prince Arthur and his squire Timias witness this. Three villains named Despetto, Decetto,... (full context)
Book VI: Canto VIII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...from Disdain and Scorn, after seeing how they captured Timias. She blames her knight Sir Calepine for leaving her in such a piteous state. Eventually she gets tired and falls asleep,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...holding a knife. They blow their bagpipes for the ceremony, and just by chance, Sir Calepine happens to be nearby, searching for Serena. He heads toward the source of the noise. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Calepine makes his way to the ceremony and sees a captured woman, not knowing yet that... (full context)