The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Sir Satyrane Character Analysis

Satyrane is a wandering noble knight who helps Una out of a forest when she is separated from the Redcross Knight. He fights Sansloy in Book I before later reappearing in Book III to help save the fair maiden Florimell from a fearsome hyena-like beast. His name, which is similar to “satyr” (a half-man half-goat), suggests his close association with nature and the forest.

Sir Satyrane Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Sir Satyrane or refer to Sir Satyrane. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book III: Canto VIII Quotes

Now when the Beast, which by her wicked art
Late forth she sent, she backe returning spyde,
Tyde with her broken girdle, it a part
Of her rich spoyles, whom he had earst destroyd,
She weend, and woundrous gladnesse to her hart applyde.

Related Characters: Florimell, Sir Satyrane, Marinell, Venus
Related Symbols: Florimell’s Gold Belt
Page Number: 492
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sir Satyrane Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Sir Satyrane appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book I: Canto VI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
One day, a fierce but noble knight called Sir Satyrane comes to the woods. He is known for his strength, which allows him to overcome... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Satyrane carries Una out of the woods with him, onto a plain. There they see a... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...how he saw the Redcross Knight fighting a pagan, and the pagan struck him down. Satyrane asks where the pagan is now, so that they can find him and strike him... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Satyrane and Una head towards the fountain where they find a pagan. Satyrane tells the pagan... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Satyrane and Sansloy continue raining down blows on each other. Suddenly, Sansloy notices Una and tries... (full context)
Book I: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...He travels far and happens to meet Una as she’s fleeing from the pagans with Satyrane. (full context)
Book III: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...her boat, but it stands on the shore watching. While the monster is there, Sir Satyrane happens to come wandering by on his own adventure. Seeing Florimell’s situation, he begins attacking... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The beast is fearsome and won’t go down. Finally, Sir Satyrane manages to restrain it with a gold belt taken from Florimell’s waist (which Satyrane found... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
As Sir Satyrane approaches the giantess, she prepares for battle with her heavy iron mace. She strikes hard... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Satyrane wakes on the ground, disappointed about how the battle went. It turns out that the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...find 300 dames who will refuse him, but so far, he’s only found three. Sir Satyrane listens to the squire’s plight before heading back to where he left the hyena-monster, which... (full context)
Book III: Canto VIII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...regrets that it’s time to turn away from Florimell back to the adventures of Sir Satyrane. Having recently finished talking with the Squire of Dames, he sees a knight riding towards... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Satyrane tells Paridell that he fears Florimell is dead (since he found her gold belt and... (full context)
Book III: Canto IX
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The narrator promises that he’ll finally explain why Paridell and Sir Satyrane aren’t being allowed into the castle. The owner of the castle is Malbecco, and his... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Sir Satyrane tries knocking on the castle door, but he’s refused. As a storm comes, they take... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...bad courtesy. When the knights make it inside and start taking off their armor, Sir Satyrane and Paridell realize that the stranger knight is a woman with blond hair—Britomart. They are... (full context)
Book III: Canto X
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Britomart and Sir Satyrane wake up ready to leave the next morning, but Paridell complains that he was injured... (full context)
Book III: Canto XI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...praises instead the chaste love of Britomart. Shortly after leaving Malbecco’s castle, she and Sir Satyrane start chasing Ollyphant (the even more greedy and lusty brother of the evil giantess Argante). (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Ollyphant doesn’t fear Sir Satyrane—it’s Britomart’s chastity that makes him run away. Britomart follows him into some woods. There they... (full context)
Book IV: Canto IV
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
They make it to the tournament, where Sir Satyrane has the gold belt of the real Florimell. He takes up arms against a pagan... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
...Sir Paliumord to join the fight against Triamond, but they can’t take Triamond down. Sir Satyrane sees an opportunity and wounds Triamond, who has to leave the battlefield. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The trumpets sound to indicate the end of the tournament for that day, and Sir Satyrane is judged the best so far. The tournament begins again the next day, but Triamond... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Cambell and Sir Satyrane fight savagely on horseback. All of a sudden, Satyrane’s horse rears and throws him off.... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Arthegall easily subdues Sir Satyrane and his knights and seems likely to claim victory, but just as evening is coming,... (full context)
Book IV: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
At the tournament, everyone judges that Sir Satyrane won the first day, Triamond won the second, and Britomart won the third, as well... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...passed to Triamond, who stays loyal to his wife, and finally ends up with Sir Satyrane, who happily accepts her because he believes that this fake Florimell is the real one... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...and start arguing, their anger fueled in part by Ate. Wishing to avoid more violence, Satyrane suggests placing Florimell (really false Florimell) in the center of all of them and letting... (full context)