The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Sir Scudamore Character Analysis

Sir Scudamore is a brave knight who falls in love with Amoretta when he sees her in the temple of Venus while obtaining the shield of love, and he ends up being the protagonist for much of Book IIII. When Amoretta is captured by the evil man Busirane, Scudamore is distraught and devotes himself to searching for her. Though he fights at first with the fellow knights Arthegall and Britomart, he eventually comes to see them as allies, and Britomart is the one who ultimately frees Amoretta from her imprisonment at the hands of Busirane.

Sir Scudamore Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Sir Scudamore or refer to Sir Scudamore. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book III: Canto XII Quotes

But Britomart uprearing her from ground,
Said, Gentle Dame, reward enough I weene
For many labours more, then I have found,
This, that in safety now I have you seen,
And meane of your deliverance have beene

Related Characters: Britomart (speaker), Sir Scudamore, Amoretta (Amoret)
Page Number: 560
Explanation and Analysis:
Book IV: Canto I Quotes

Of lovers sad calamities of old,
Full many piteous stories doe remaine,
But none more piteous ever was ytold,
Then that of Amorets hart-binding chaine,
And this of Florimels unworthie paine

Page Number: 383
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sir Scudamore Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Sir Scudamore appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book III: Canto VI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...be a noble, chaste lady. She’ll eventually fall in love with a great knight named Scudamore and face many challenges, but the narrator says that’s another story. The narrator says it’s... (full context)
Book III: Canto XI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...a knight on the ground with his equipment scattered everywhere. The knight, whose name is Scudamore, tells her about Amoretta, his love who has been taken captive by an evil man... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore is so upset that he looks like he’s choking to death, so Britomart goes to... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Britomart and Scudamore make their way to a castle where great fire and stinking sulfur prevent them from... (full context)
Book III: Canto XII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...1596 revised version of Book XII’s ending, Britomart goes outside with Amoretta and finds that Scudamore and his squire have left to go find their own way to help Amoretta, not... (full context)
Book IV: Canto I
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Paridell and Blandamour are both enchanted by Amoretta, but soon Scudamore comes riding onto the scene. Paridell challenges Scudamore but gets knocked to the ground and... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore accuses Ate of lying. Duessa, however, says that she did in fact see Amoretta kissing... (full context)
Book IV: Canto II
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...attempts by Blandamour and Paridell to keep stirring up an argument, Glauce’s words finally calm Scudamore down. Soon another knight with a lady by his side comes riding by. His name... (full context)
Book IV: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...glad to have a virtuous companion like Amoretta, Amoretta still longs to be reunited with Scudamore. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore himself, however, seeks vengeance against Britomart because he jealously believes that she has made Amoretta... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
Care has six servants in his workshop, including one who is a giant. Scudamore admires all the work he sees and asks what’s going on, but no one will... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
At last, even the noise isn’t enough to keep Scudamore awake. He drifts into sleep, only to dream about Care burning him in the side... (full context)
Book IV: Canto VI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
After leaving Care’s workshop, Scudamore feels melancholy as he rides the next day. He happens to run into another knight... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...about being defeated in a tournament recently by a knight with an enchanted spear, and Scudamore realizes that knight must be Britomart. Arthegall and Scudamore realize they have a common enemy... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthegall and Scudamore ride and eventually come across Britomart. Scudamore charges her first but gets knocked down off... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore sees Britomart’s true identity and is also amazed. Glauce is happy to see a break... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore says that he’s glad to see Arthegall doesn’t scorn all women. At hearing Arthegall’s name,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...and Arthegall agree not to fight and begin to feel passion for each other. Meanwhile, Scudamore is still worried about his Amoretta, so he asks Britomart if she has any news.... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore is disappointed and scared to hear of Amoretta’s disappearance. Britomart promises to help him find... (full context)
Book IV: Canto IX
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...four knights in the group are brawling over false Florimell. Near these knights, Britomart and Scudamore are watching the scene unfold. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Britomart, who embarrassed them all at the recent tournament, they all turn against her and Scudamour. As they attack, they ignore Britomart’s attempts to reason with them. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Britomart says she has lost her former love, a gentle maid (meaning Amoretta), and Scudamore regrets Amoretta’s loss even more. (Though Amoretta was with Arthur, she’s not at the scene... (full context)
Book IV: Canto X
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore begins his tale by saying that love and suffering are often intertwined, but he will... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...near it is the message that whoever possesses the shield will also possess fair Amoretta. Scudamore is eager to get the shield, so he challenges one of the knights on guard... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Scudamore claims the shield, then continues to a gate where the porter at the door is... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...by a hideous giant named Danger. Most warriors turn back when they see Danger, but Scudamore decides that instead of retreating or trying to sneak between the giant’s legs, he’ll face... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The inside of the island is an idyllic paradise where lots of fresh plants grow. Scudamore sees places for lovers to walk but also places for a different sort of “lovers”... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Concord invites Scudamore to come into the inner temple. There are many altars in the temple, but the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...are many lovers, either complaining of their problems or offering thanks for their good fortune. Scudamore begins murmuring a soft prayer to Venus. He notices some women nearby. Womanhood is their... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
As soon as Scudamore sees Amoretta, his heart begins to throb. While it seems sacrilegious to him to interrupt,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Amoretta asks for Scudamore to let go of her hand, sometimes crying, sometimes smiling, but he doesn’t. He leads... (full context)