The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Sir Turpine Character Analysis

There are actually two characters named Sir Turpine. One is captured by Amazons serving their queen Radigund and eventually put to death. The more significant Sir Turpine, however, is a rude man in Book VI who torments Calepine and Serena. Eventually Arthur confronts him and defeats him, letting him live if he gives up the knighthood, but Sir Turpine doesn’t change his ways. Finally, Arthur, with help from the savage man, defeats Sir Turpine again and steals his armor, tying Turpine upside-down to a tree as a warning to other false knights.

Sir Turpine Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Sir Turpine or refer to Sir Turpine. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book VI: Canto I Quotes

But mongst them all was none more courteous Knight,
Then Calidore, beloved over all,
in whom it seemes that gentlenesse of spright
And manners mylde were planted naturall

Related Characters: Narrator (speaker), Calidore, Sir Turpine
Related Symbols: Faerie Court
Page Number: 878
Explanation and Analysis:
Book VI: Canto VII Quotes

And after all, for greater infamie,
He by the heeles him hung upon a tree,
And baffuld so, that all which passed by,
The picture of his punishment might see,
And by the like ensample warned bee

Page Number: 956
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sir Turpine Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Sir Turpine appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book VI: Canto III
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...travel until they come to a river that isn’t crossable on foot. A knight ( Sir Turpine , but not the Sir Turpine killed by Radigund) and lady (Blandina) also come to... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...let Sir Calepine and Serena inside. The porter replies that the lord of the castle, Sir Turpine , only lets into the castle knights that he has fought with. Turpine is stern... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...knight who wouldn’t help him by the river or let them stay in his castle: Sir Turpine . (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
While Calepine is angry with Sir Turpine , he doesn’t want to fight because he needs to help Serena. But the rude... (full context)
Book VI: Canto IV
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...man who, up until that point in his life, had never shown pity before, sees Sir Turpine ’s cruel assault and tries to intervene. Though the man doesn’t have armor or weapons,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The savage man fights up close with Sir Turpine , gaining the advantage and causing him to flee. Though the savage man is fast... (full context)
Book VI: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthur is moved to hear from Serena about the uncourteous behavior of Sir Turpine . They make their way to a hermitage to rest, though both Serena and Timias... (full context)
Book VI: Canto VI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Arthur and the “savage” man go out seeking Sir Turpine as Serena described him. They go to Turpine’s castle, where Arthur pretends to be a... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Sir Turpine accuses Arthur of cowardly slaying his men, then sends 40 new men over to attack... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Blandina runs over and covers Sir Turpine with her clothes, pleading for Arthur to show mercy. Arthur holds off on dealing a... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthur goes back to check on the savage man and finds him still ruthlessly attacking Sir Turpine ’s men. He orders the savage man to back down. The savage man and Arthur... (full context)
Book VI: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Cowardly Sir Turpine has no intention of improving himself, though he puts on a friendly outer face. Two... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The knight goes back to Sir Turpine and lies to him, telling him that both his partner and Arthur are dead. He... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Sir Turpine begins to quake at the thought of being punished by Arthur, so he makes plans... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The savage man shakes his wooden weapon. Just then Arthur wakes up and immediately sees Sir Turpine coming for him. Arthur gets his sword ready, but Turpine immediately drops down and begs... (full context)