The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Talus Character Analysis

Talus is Arthegall’s metal companion and seems to be something like an early version of a robot. He wields a flail and can be merciless, with Arthegall often having to restrain him from slaying too many people. Talus represents an absolute idea of justice, which is balanced out by the more nuanced ideas of justice expressed by Arthegall and other characters.

Talus Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Talus or refer to Talus. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book V: Canto XII Quotes

But ere he could reform it thoroughly,
He through occasion called was away,
To Faerie Court, that of necessity
His course of Justice he was forst to stay,
And Talus to revoke from the right way

Related Characters: Arthegall, Talus, Eirena, Grantorto
Related Symbols: Faerie Court
Page Number: 870
Explanation and Analysis:
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Talus Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Talus appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book V: Canto I
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
...to go back to the heavens. She left behind a man made of iron called Talus who will execute Arthegall’s commands. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthegall and Talus go to find Eirena. Along the way, they run into a crying squire next to... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
...knight is long gone but points in the direction of a plain. Arthegall immediately sends Talus out in that direction. Talus soon catches up with the knight, whose name is Sir... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Sir Sanglier resists his punishment, but Talus forces him to take the head. The squire praises Arthegall’s sense of justice and offers... (full context)
Book V: Canto II
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthegall goes to the castle where Pollente’s daughter Munera lives. With Talus’s help, Arthegall breaks into the fortified castle. Munera tries to stop him with stones and... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...castle wall where she drowns in the mud. Arthegall then burns her possessions and has Talus destroy the castle from the foundations so that it can’t be repaired. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Arthegall and Talus set out again, and they soon come across a giant. The giant has a scale... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
...giant isn’t interested in justice; he’s only interested in extreme positions and misleading people. When Talus realizes this, he knocks the giant off his rock, and he falls into the sea... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The giant’s followers see this and raise their weapons against Arthegall and Talus. Arthegall is dismayed, because he doesn’t want to get his noble hands dirty with the... (full context)
Book V: Canto III
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Arthegall wants to slay Braggadochio, but Sir Guyon says that Braggadochio’s shame is punishment enough. Talus carries Braggadochio off, shaving his beard and taking away his shield. Braggadochio is disgraced, and... (full context)
Book V: Canto IV
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Around him, tyrannical women are taunting him. Arthegall doesn’t like fighting women, so he sends Talus to disperse them. The women go home. Talus then frees the knight, whose name is... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...with her Amazon warrior women joining the battle, but their arrows are unable to pierce Talus’s iron body. That night both sides withdraw, with Talus keeping watch for Arthegall and Sir... (full context)
Book V: Canto VI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Talus, who could not be subdued by the Amazons, leaves to tell Britomart about the situation... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Britomart angrily assumes at first that Arthegall is wooing Radigund, but Talus assures her he’s in no state to do so. Convinced at last, Britomart rides off... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Soon after starting their journey, Britomart and Talus run into an old knight who offers them a place to stay for the night.... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...two other rude knights come in the middle of the night looking for a fight. Talus, however, fends them off. It turns out the old knight is Dolon, a wicked knight... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...own vengeance on Dolon for tricking her, but he’s nowhere to be found. She and Talus leave, coming to the bridge where Arthegall fought and killed Pollente. Two pagan knights challenge... (full context)
Book V: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...(who is powerful and just, as well as being the wife of the god Osiris). Talus isn’t allowed into the temple. Britomart goes deeper into the temple and finds an idol... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Radigund’s death angers the Amazons, but Talus starts killing any of the warriors that attack him. Britomart goes into the prison and... (full context)
Book V: Canto IX
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
...his net, and Arthegall rushes after her, but the terrain is treacherous, so he sends Talus ahead. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
When Talus catches Malengin, he uses his flail to break his bones and disembowel him. Talus, Arthur,... (full context)
Book V: Canto XI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
...knight’s name has been blotted by shame and his shield is gone. Nevertheless, Arthegall sends Talus to disperse the crowd and free the knight from the lady. The knight thanks Arthegall... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The peasants crowd around Arthegall and Burbon like flies, but they’re no match for Talus’s iron flail. Arthegall and Burbon themselves defeat the captains of the mob, then continue on... (full context)
Book V: Canto XII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...traveling near the coast, he happens to find a boat in good working order. Arthegall, Talus, and Sir Sergis set sail, but as they go to land on the island where... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthegall, Sir Sergis, and Talus draw near Grantorto and send out a message to say that Arthegall will challenge him... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...a monster called the Blatant Beast, which has a hundred tongues. Arthegall, however, doesn’t send Talus to chastise the hags. He keeps heading back toward Faerie Court and doesn’t let anything... (full context)