The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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The Lion Character Analysis

The Lion is a fearsome wild animal that is nevertheless tamed by Una’s grace and beauty. It travels with her and protects her after she is separated from the Redcross Knight, although eventually it is slain by Sansloy. Lions have symbolic significance in both the Bible and British history, and this Lion represents how the faithful like Una will be protected when they need it most.
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The Lion Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character The Lion appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book I: Canto III
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Nevertheless, she remains faithful as she wanders in search of the Redcross Knight. Suddenly, a Lion rushes out of the woods, with a fierce gaping mouth. But when it sees Una,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The Lion puts aside its pride and anger and kisses Una’s feet. Una is moved to tears... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The Lion keeps watch over Una as she sleeps and walks by her side as she travels... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Upon seeing the Lion, the damsel throws away her pot of water and flees back home to her blind... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The day ends, and Una lies down to sleep under the Lion’s watch, still at the blind mother’s house. All of a sudden, in the middle of... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...gets a surprise when he comes into Corceca’s house and is suddenly pinned by the Lion. The Lion tears the criminal into a thousand pieces. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Just then Abessa and Corceca notice that Kirkrapine (the criminal) has been killed by the Lion, and they begin to grieve. Una tries to leave, but Abessa and Corceca come after... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...begins to ride with the knight, telling him about her journey so far with the Lion. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Archimago is in a daze, so he doesn’t reply. Sansloy doesn’t kill Archimago. Next, the Lion tries to fight Sansloy. Sansloy, however, is skilled with weapons and manages to pierce the... (full context)