The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Timias Character Analysis

Timias is Arthur’s faithful squire who accompanies him on many of his quests. Like Arthur, Timias is always ready to help passersby in need. He eventually falls in love with the fair huntress Belphoebe, but after being tempted by another woman (Belphoebe’s twin sister Amoretta), he forces himself to do penance by living humbly until he is worthy again of her love. Eventually, Timias completes his penance and is restored in Belphoebe’s favor, and he reunites with Arthur.
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Timias Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Timias appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book II: Canto IX
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
...and Arthur make their way to a castle where the gate is locked. Arthur’s squire (Timias) blows a horn, and a watchman comes, warning the knights to go away at once... (full context)
Book III: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Arthur’s squire Timias has been busy defeating the lustful foster who was chasing Florimell earlier. The foster flees... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The foster and his brothers sneak up on Timias and try to attack him, but their initial strike doesn’t injure him much. A fierce... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Timias takes little joy in his victory because his thigh wound is still bleeding heavily. He... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Timias awakes and is amazed to find that Belphoebe has dressed his wounds. He praises her,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Unintentionally, however, Belphoebe has only healed one wound to create another, patching up Timias’s body but causing his heart to fall in love with her. He worries that as... (full context)
Book IV: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...As it turns out, she’s in the same forest where Belphoebe was being chased by Timias (Arthur’s squire) earlier. Just as Amoretta is overtaken by the carle, Timias sees them and... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Timias and the carle fight, with the “savage” man using his club and even using Amoretta... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...kills him. She frees his prisoners from the den and heads back to Amoretta and Timias. When she gets back, she finds Timias kissing Amoretta and tending to her wounds. She... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Timias tries to follow after Belphoebe, but she threatens him with arrows. He retreats to a... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...cabin and finds a wretched-looking man who doesn’t speak, so Arthur doesn’t recognize him as Timias. Arthur thinks he can see signs of a great man underneath the rude exterior. He... (full context)
Book IV: Canto VIII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Timias continues to live in penance for his unfaithfulness to Belphoebe. One day, a turtle dove... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...get the jewel back and ends up following the bird all the way back to Timias. She doesn’t recognize him, but he kneels down to kiss the ground she walks on.... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...still adventuring in the forest and doesn’t hear the good news about his former squire Timias. He happens to come to a place in the woods where Aemylia and Amoretta are... (full context)
Book VI: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...man is adjusting some equipment on Sir Calepine’s horse, and Prince Arthur and his squire Timias witness this. Three villains named Despetto, Decetto, and Defetto have been plotting ways to overthrow... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
While chasing the Blatant Beast, Timias was lured into a place where he was surrounded on each side by Defetto, Decetto,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthur and Timias believe the savage man has stolen his armor, and so they start to fight with... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Sir Turpine. They make their way to a hermitage to rest, though both Serena and Timias remain troubled by their wounds. Arthur decides to leave them in the hermit’s care and... (full context)
Book VI: Canto VI
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
The wounds the Blatant Beast left in Serena and Timias only continue to fester and grow. The hermit, who was once a proud knight, continues... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Serena and Timias stick together, since she is fearful and wants protection, and he is courteous. They come... (full context)
Book VI: Canto VII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
Turning back to Serena and Timias, they behold the lady on an ass, led by a fool and a churl. The... (full context)
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The Role of Women Theme Icon
...until she saves as many people as she has “killed.” When she meets Serena and Timias, she has been repenting for a year and only saved two out of 22 required... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Timias is dismayed to see how Disdain and Scorn treat Mirabella, so he attacks Disdain. When... (full context)
Book VI: Canto VIII
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Mirabella sees Timias taken captive by Disdain and Scorn, and she feels pity. They keep traveling and run... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...she’s saying this, Arthur looks at Disdain’s captive and is surprised to recognize his squire Timias. Meanwhile, the “savage” man has been watching and takes that moment to ambush Scorn, but... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...Serena is fleeing for her life from Disdain and Scorn, after seeing how they captured Timias. She blames her knight Sir Calepine for leaving her in such a piteous state. Eventually... (full context)