The Fellowship of the Ring

The Fellowship of the Ring

by

J.R.R. Tolkien

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Frodo Baggins Character Analysis

The favored nephew of the famous Bilbo Baggins, Frodo is a hobbit who loves his home in the Shire too much to give in to itching feelings for adventure in the wider world. However, he is propelled beyond the Shire’s borders when his friend and mentor Gandalf the Grey advises him that the magic ring Bilbo recently gifted him is in fact the Dark Lord Sauron’s One Ring. Sauron has recently learned of the Ring’s whereabouts and has sent his servants, the Black Riders, to the Shire to find it. Once he repossesses the Ring, Sauron will have total power over the Free Peoples of Middle-earth. Although frightened, Frodo gamely agrees to Gandalf’s plan for him to deliver the Ring to the elf-haven Rivendell. He is accompanied by his loyal friends Sam, Merry, and Pippin, and the four hobbits become members of the Company of the Ring that sets out from Rivendell to destroy the Ring in Mordor. Frodo is an unassuming hobbit who, like his uncle, surprises his peers with his resilience and quiet heroism. The Ring has a corrupting influence on all creatures (apart from the exceptional Tom Bombadil), especially on those individuals that bear it. Despite lacking skills in fighting or magic, Frodo proves himself a worthy candidate to bear the Ring due to his humility and his genuine lack of desire to wield the weapon for its power. By the end of The Fellowship of the Ring, Frodo has accepted his responsibility in bearing the Ring to Mordor, despite the likely cost of his life. The insight he has developed through the adventures of The Fellowship results in his wise yet difficult decision to break the Company of the Ring and travel to Mordor on his own.

Frodo Baggins Quotes in The Fellowship of the Ring

The The Fellowship of the Ring quotes below are all either spoken by Frodo Baggins or refer to Frodo Baggins. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Random House edition of The Fellowship of the Ring published in 1954.
Prologue Quotes

At no time had Hobbits of any kind been warlike, and they had never fought among themselves. [...]

Nonetheless, ease and peace had left this people still curiously tough. They were, if it came to it, difficult to daunt or kill; and they were, perhaps, so unwearyingly fond of good things not least because they could, when put to it, do without them, and could survive rough handling by grief, foe, or weather in a way that astonished those who did not know them well and looked no further than their bellies and their well-fed faces.

Related Characters: Frodo Baggins, Bilbo Baggins
Page Number: 5
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

For some years he was quite happy and did not worry about the future. But half unknown to himself the regret that he did not go with Bilbo was steadily growing. He found himself wandering at times, especially in the autumn, about the wild lands, and strange visions of mountains that he had never seen came into his dreams. He began to say to himself “Perhaps I shall cross the river myself one day.” To which the other half of his mind always replied “Not yet.”

[…] He took to wandering further afield and more often by himself; and Merry and his other friends watched him anxiously. Often he was seen walking and talking with the strange wayfarers that began at this time to appear in the Shire.

Related Characters: Frodo Baggins (speaker), Meriadoc (Merry) Brandybuck, Bilbo Baggins
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

“A mortal, Frodo, who keeps one of the Great Rings, does not die, but he does not grow or obtain more life, he merely continues, until at last every minute is a weariness. And if he often uses the Ring to make himself invisible, he fades: he becomes in the end invisible permanently, and walks in the twilight under the eye of the dark power that rules the Rings. Yes, sooner or later – later, if he is strong or well-meaning to begin with, but neither strength nor good purpose will last – sooner or later the dark power will devour him.”

“How terrifying!” said Frodo. There was another long silence. The sound of Sam Gamgee cutting the lawn came in from the garden.

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 46
Explanation and Analysis:

"So now, when its master was awake once more and sending out his dark thought from Mirkwood, it abandoned Gollum. Only to be picked up by the most unlikely person imaginable: Bilbo from the Shire!

Behind that there was something else at work, beyond any design of the Ring-maker. I can put it no plainer than by saying that Bilbo was meant to find the Ring, and not by its maker. In which case you also were meant to have it. And that may be an encouraging thought."

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 54-5
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 1, Chapter 3 Quotes

“[Bilbo] used often to say there was only one Road; and that it was like a great river: its springs were at every doorstep, and every path was its tributary. ‘It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out of your door,’ he used to say. ‘You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to. Do you realize that this is the very path that goes through Mirkwood, and that if you let it, it might take you to the Lonely Mountains or even further and to worse places?’ He used to say that on the path outside the front door at Bag End, especially after he had been out for a long walk."

Page Number: 72-3
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 1, Chapter 4 Quotes

“If you don’t come back, sir, then I shan’t, that’s certain,” said Sam. “Don’t you leave him! They said to me. Leave him! I said. I never mean to. I am going with him, if he climbs to the Moon, and if any of those Black Riders try to stop him, they’ll have Sam Gamgee to reckon with, I said. They laughed.”

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 85
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 1, Chapter 8 Quotes

There is a seed of courage hidden (often deeply, it is true) in the heart of the fattest and most timid Hobbit, waiting for some final and desperate danger to make it grow. Frodo was neither very fat nor very timid; indeed, though he did not know it, Bilbo (and Gandalf) had thought him the best Hobbit in the Shire. He thought he had come to the end of his adventure, and a terrible end, but the thought hardened him. He found himself stiffening, as if for a final spring; he no longer felt limp like a helpless prey.

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 137
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 1, Chapter 10 Quotes

"They come from Mordor," said Strider in a low voice. "From Mordor, Barliman, if that means anything to you."

"Save us!" cried Mr. Butterbur turning pale; the name evidently was known to him. "That is the worst news that has come to Bree in my time."

"It is," said Frodo. "Are you still willing to help me?"

"I am," said Mr. Butterbur. "More than ever. Though I don't know what the likes of me can do against, against –" he faltered.

“Against the Shadow in the East,” said Strider quietly. “Not much, Barliman, but every little helps. You can let Mr. Underhill stay here tonight, as Mr. Underhill, and you can forget the name of Baggins, till he is far away.”

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 165
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 2, Chapter 1 Quotes

Slowly he drew it out. Bilbo put out his hand. But Frodo quickly drew back the Ring. To his distress and amazement he found that he was no longer looking at Bilbo; a shadow seemed to have fallen between them, and through it he found himself eyeing a little wrinkled creature with a hungry face and bony groping hands. He felt a desire to strike him.

The music and singing round them seemed to falter, and a silence fell. Bilbo looked quickly at Frodo's face and passed his hand across his eyes. “I understand now,” he said. “Put it away! I am sorry: sorry you have come in for this burden: sorry about everything.”

Related Characters: Bilbo Baggins (speaker), Frodo Baggins, Gollum / Smeagol
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 225-6
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 2, Chapter 7 Quotes

“Many things I can command the Mirror to reveal,” she answered, “and to some I can show what they desire to see. But the Mirror will also show things unbidden, and those are often stranger and more profitable than things which we wish to behold. What you will see, if you leave the Mirror free to work, I cannot tell. For it shows things that were, and things that are, and things that yet may be. But which is it that he sees, even the wisest cannot always tell. Do you wish to look?”

Related Characters: Galadriel (speaker), Frodo Baggins, Samwise (Sam) Gamgee
Related Symbols: The Mirror of Galadriel
Page Number: 352
Explanation and Analysis:

“You are wise and fearless and fair, Lady Galadriel,” said Frodo. “I will give you the One Ring, if you ask for it. It is too great a matter for me.”

[…] She stood before Frodo seeming now tall beyond measurement, and beautiful beyond enduring, terrible and worshipful. Then she let her hand fall, and the light faded, and suddenly she laughed again, and lo! she was shrunken: a slender elf-woman, clad in simple white, whose gentle voice was soft and sad.

“I pass the test,” she said. “I will diminish, and go into the West, and remain Galadriel.”

Related Characters: Frodo Baggins (speaker), Galadriel (speaker)
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 357
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 2, Chapter 8 Quotes

[Aragorn’s] own plan, while Gandalf remained with them, had been to go with Boromir, and with his sword help to deliver Gondor. For he believed that the message of the dreams was a summons, and that the hour had come at last when the heir of Elendil should come forth and strive with Sauron for the mastery. But in Moria the burden of Gandalf had been laid on him; and he knew that he could not now forsake the Ring, if Frodo refused in the end to go with Boromir. And yet what help could he or any of the Company give to Frodo, save to walk blindly with him into the darkness?

Page Number: 359
Explanation and Analysis:

The travellers sat still without moving or speaking. On the green bank near to the very point of the Tongue the Lady Galadriel stood alone and silent. As they passed her they turned and their eyes watched her slowly floating away from them. For so it seemed to them: Lórien was slipping backward, like a bright ship masted with enchanted trees, sailing on to forgotten shores, while they sat helpless upon the margin of the grey and leafless world.

Page Number: 367
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 2, Chapter 10 Quotes

"We of Minas Tirith have been staunch through long years of trial. We do not desire the power of Wizard-lords, only strength to defend ourselves, strength in a just cause. And behold! in our need chance brings to light the Ring of Power. It is a gift, I say; a gift to the foes of Mordor. It is mad not to use it, to use the power of the Enemy against him. The fearless, the ruthless, these alone will achieve victory. What could not Aragorn do? Or if he refuses, why not Boromir? The Ring would give me power of Command. How I would drive the hosts of Mordor, and all men would flock to my banner!"

Related Characters: Boromir (speaker), Frodo Baggins, Gandalf the Grey, Aragorn / Strider, Sauron
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 36
Explanation and Analysis:

The Misty Mountains were crawling like anthills: orcs were issuing out of a thousand holes. Under the boughs of Mirkwood there was deadly strife of Elves and Men and fell bests. The land of the Beornings was aflame; a cloud was over Moria; smoke rose on the borders of Lórien.

Horsemen were galloping on the grass of Rohan; wolves poured from Isengard. From the havens of Harad ships of war put out to sea; and out of the East Men were moving endlessly: swordsmen, spearmen, bowmen upon horses, chariots of chieftains and laden wains. All the power of the Dark Lord was in motion. Then turning south again he beheld Minas Tirith. Far away it seemed, and beautiful: white-walled, many towered, proud and fair upon its mountain-seat; its battlements glittered with steel, and its turrets were bright with many banners. Hope leaped in [Frodo's] heart. But against Minas Tirith was set another fortress, greater and more strong. Thither, eastward, unwilling his eye was drawn. It passed the ruined bridges of Osgiliath, the grinning gates of Minas Morgul, and the haunted Mountains, and it looked upon Gorgoroth, the valley of terror in the Land of Mordor.

Related Characters: Frodo Baggins, Sauron, Saruman the White
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 391
Explanation and Analysis:

"But I must go at once. It's the only way."

"Of course it is," answered Sam. "But not alone. I'm coming too, or neither of us isn't going. I'll knock holes in all the boats first."

Frodo actually laughed. A sudden warmth and gladness touched his heart.

[…] “ So my plan is spoilt!” said Frodo. “It is no good trying to escape you. But I'm glad, Sam. I cannot tell you how glad. Come along! It is plain that we were meant to go together. We will go, and may the others find a safe road!”

Related Characters: Frodo Baggins (speaker), Samwise (Sam) Gamgee (speaker)
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 397
Explanation and Analysis:
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Frodo Baggins Character Timeline in The Fellowship of the Ring

The timeline below shows where the character Frodo Baggins appears in The Fellowship of the Ring. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Prologue
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...were largely disregarded by their fellow inhabitants on Middle-earth until the exploits of Bilbo and Frodo Baggins. (full context)
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...and lives a long and happy life in his homeland. Only Gandalf and Bilbo’s nephew Frodo know that Bilbo keeps it on him at all times on a chain in his... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 1
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...Bilbo’s luxurious hobbit hole at Bag End. Bilbo is particularly close with his favorite nephew, Frodo Baggins, and they curiously share the same birthday of September 22. At the age of... (full context)
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...Many party guests consider this to be a joke in poor taste, or even rude. Frodo is the only hobbit present who seems unfazed by his uncle’s strange behavior. After privately... (full context)
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...Lonely Mountain adventures of his youth. He puts his ring in an envelope addressed to Frodo, but suddenly decides to take it back and slips the ring in his pocket. (full context)
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...hobbit’s well-preserved appearance. Bilbo’s one regret in leaving Bag End is that he will miss Frodo dreadfully. Bilbo explains that he has left everything he owns to Frodo, although Gandalf calls... (full context)
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Bilbo gets angry at Gandalf’s insistence that he leave the ring for Frodo—a reaction that is very out of character for the hobbit. Gandalf intentionally heightens his stature... (full context)
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Shortly after, Frodo enters Bag End to find Gandalf sitting in the darkness of Bilbo’s study, thinking deeply.... (full context)
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With Bilbo departed, Frodo is the new master of Bag End and feels it is his duty to see... (full context)
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Because of these disturbances, Frodo bars the door to all but his close friend Merry—a level-headed and responsible hobbit who... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 2
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...who vanishes with a flash before reappearing laden with jewels and gold. In the meantime, Frodo deals with the gossip surrounding his associations with the “unnatural” characters of Bilbo and Gandalf,... (full context)
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As he nears the age of fifty, Frodo is also becoming restless for adventure. Shire locals observe him interacting with strange travelers that... (full context)
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...has not been seen at all there in the past nine years, suddenly calls on Frodo at Bag End. They stay up late into the night discussing worldly news. (full context)
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The next morning Frodo and Gandalf sit by the open window of the study, where they can hear Sam... (full context)
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...in the War of the Last Alliance in the Second Age. Gandalf can now tell Frodo a detailed history of the Ring, which is master of the nineteen rings of power... (full context)
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...One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.” Finally, Gandalf tells Frodo that Sauron has risen again and is searching for the Ring in the Shire—for the... (full context)
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After being momentarily frozen in terror at this new knowledge of the Ring, Frodo seeks advice from Gandalf about what to do in response to the threat of Sauron... (full context)
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...into the fires of Mount Doom in Mordor, which is where the Ring was created. Frodo shrinks at the idea of such a dangerous journey, and offers the Ring to Gandalf... (full context)
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...take time to sit and reflect on the options before them. At last, Gandalf asks Frodo what he is thinking. The hobbit admits that he is frightened, but he knows it... (full context)
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Gandalf is quite flabbergasted by Frodo’s candid and thoughtful response—once again, the wizard says, he has been surprised by the bravery... (full context)
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...objects. The loyal gardener is petrified that the wizard will turn him into something “unnatural”— Frodo jokingly suggests a spotted toad—but he also asks to accompany Frodo as a trustworthy companion.... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 3
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Over the next three weeks, Gandalf helps Frodo make plans to leave the Shire and set out for the elf-haven Rivendell. To conceal... (full context)
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As autumn sets in and the party approaches, Frodo grows anxious at Gandalf’s failure to return. He celebrates his birthday with a small dinner... (full context)
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...while Merry and Fatty drive a cart of belongings ahead to the cottage at Crickhollow. Frodo, Sam, and Pippin intend to follow on foot, enjoying the Shire’s beautiful countryside as they... (full context)
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...their second day of crossing the Shire’s countryside, the hobbits hear hoofbeats approaching behind them. Frodo feels a sudden urge to hide, and so they conceal themselves in long grass, planning... (full context)
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Frodo is frightened by the appearance of this strange Black Rider, and is considering putting on... (full context)
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...by the sound of an approaching horse. It is another Black Rider, and once again Frodo feels a strong urge to use the Ring to disappear. However, the sudden sounds of... (full context)
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...(he has long dreamed of meeting them), Gildor and his company are especially taken by Frodo—they name him “Elf-friend” for his knowledge of their language and customs. The hobbits enjoy a... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4
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Frodo, Sam, and Pippin wake the next morning to find that the elves have departed, leaving... (full context)
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...they have navigated too far south. Pippin recognizes fields belonging to Farmer Maggot. This alarms Frodo almost as much as the Black Riders, for he has been terrified of the farmer... (full context)
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...of Baggins. Farmer Maggot is an astute person who begins to piece together much of Frodo’s story, realizing that the three hobbits are in trouble. Frodo, Sam, and Pippin gratefully accept... (full context)
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On the way, Frodo, Sam, and Pippin hear muffled hoof steps, but luckily it is Merry, not a Black... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 5
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Merry leads Frodo, Sam, and Pippin onto the Buckleberry Ferry, the only way to cross the Brandywine River... (full context)
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The hobbits walk from the Ferry to Frodo’s cottage in Crickhollow, where they are welcomed by Fatty. Under Merry’s direction, Fatty has helped... (full context)
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Frodo is shocked by his friends’ collective deceit, but he is thankful for their courage and... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6
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...may be closing in again, the hobbits leave Crickhollow at first light the next morning. Frodo wants to avoid established roads, so they enter the sinister Old Forest, where Merry has... (full context)
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...of the forest, coming to the River Withywindle. As they follow the river’s winding path, Frodo, Merry, and Pippin are overcome by an unnatural tiredness and fall asleep beside the river.... (full context)
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Sam swiftly rescues Frodo from the water. Frodo immediately wakes up, but the two cannot free their trapped friends... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 7
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Frodo, Sam, Pippin, and Merry find cheer and comfort at the house of Tom Bombadil. Meeting... (full context)
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...puts it on, but he is immune to its power of invisibility, shocking the hobbits. Frodo is somewhat annoyed at Tom’s flippant regard for the Ring as he puts it to... (full context)
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...can sing to call for his help if they run into danger the next day. Frodo, Pippin, Sam, and Merry fall asleep, with no dreams to trouble their rest tonight. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 8
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The next morning, Frodo, Merry, Sam, Pippin, and their ponies leave the house of Tom Bombadil and travel north... (full context)
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...the hobbits move slowly through the fog in what they believe is a northerly direction. Frodo hurries ahead of the group when he believes he spies the exit from the Barrow-downs.... (full context)
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When Frodo awakes, he realizes that he is trapped inside the burial mound. He is desperately afraid... (full context)
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Suddenly a chanting song wafts through the darkness, and Frodo is chilled to the bone. When he sees a long arm groping toward Sam from... (full context)
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Tripping over Merry, Frodo suddenly remembers Tom Bombadil’s song that he taught to the hobbits in case of emergency.... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 9
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...Bree, which is also a bustling stopover for travelers. Upon entering the town by nightfall, Frodo, Pippin, Merry, and Sam are uneasy about the gatekeeper’s questions concerning their identities and business.... (full context)
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Frodo and his companions enter The Prancing Pony, where the innkeeper Barliman Butterbur settles them in... (full context)
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...the Bree hobbits warmly welcome the three Shire hobbits and are curious about their travels. Frodo is using the name Underhill, as Gandalf suggested, and invents a story that he is... (full context)
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Strider waves Frodo over to join him, which the hobbit uneasily agrees to. The Ranger seems to guess... (full context)
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Frodo steals the crowd’s attention with a few words of thanks for their hospitality, during he... (full context)
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Frodo crawls to the edge of the room and removes the Ring, feeling immensely foolish and... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 10
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Frodo, Sam, and Pippin return to their rooms and find that Strider is already there, while... (full context)
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...about whether to trust Strider, they are interrupted by Butterbur, who bears a letter for Frodo from Gandalf. The innkeeper was meant to send it to Frodo three months ago, but... (full context)
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 Upon Butterbur’s exit, Strider prompts Frodo to read Gandalf’s letter. It reveals that the wizard urged them to leave the Shire... (full context)
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...unsafe for the hobbits to sleep in their own rooms, so they settle in another. Frodo, Sam, and Pippin fill Merry in about Strider and Gandalf’s letter while the Ranger and... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 11
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While Frodo, Pippin, Sam, and Merry prepare for sleep in Bree, back in Crickhollow Fatty is alarmed... (full context)
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The next morning, back in Bree, Strider wakes Frodo, Sam, Merry, and Pippin at first light. They discover that their original rooms have been... (full context)
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...insects attack the hobbits relentlessly. On their fourth night since they set out from Bree, Frodo and Strider notice strange flashing lights far off in the distance. The next day, the... (full context)
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...danger caused him to flee. Strider suggests that it was Gandalf’s power that he and Frodo witnessed flickering in the night sky three days ago—the wizard was likely attacked by Black... (full context)
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...decides to light a small fire in a hollow on the side of the hill. Frodo suddenly sees black shapes moving toward the bottom of the hill, warning his friends that... (full context)
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After Strider finishes his stories, Frodo, Pippin, Merry, and Sam rest and keep watch. The hobbits suddenly feel a sense of... (full context)
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...the campfire’s light. Merry and Pippin throw themselves down in terror, while Sam huddles at Frodo’s side. As five Black Riders advance on the Ring-bearer, Frodo cannot resist the overwhelming urge... (full context)
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Still wearing the Ring, Frodo leaps downward to stab the feet of his attacker, meeting the crowned Black Rider with... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 12
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When Frodo regains consciousness, he is clutching the Ring in his hand and lying beside the fire.... (full context)
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When Strider learns of Frodo’s wound, he is gravely concerned, especially when he later discovers the hilt of the weapon... (full context)
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...hasten from Weathertop toward Rivendell. For approximately ten days they struggle through the wilderness, with Frodo’s wound growing increasingly worse. The group keeps away from the road as much as possible,... (full context)
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...Riders burst into pursuit behind the party. Glorfindel commands his horse to run forward with Frodo, and the swift steed manages to evade four more Black Riders who appear from Frodo’s... (full context)
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The foremost Black Rider walks to the edge of the Ford and commands Frodo to return to meet them. The hobbit retaliates by invoking the names of Elbereth and... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 1
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Several days later, Frodo wakes and finds himself in Rivendell. Resting in bed to gain his bearings, he sits... (full context)
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Frodo reunites with the ever-loyal Sam, and they accompany their friends to a feast-like dinner in... (full context)
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After attending to the business of food, Frodo is also delighted to meet the person sitting beside him, for it is Bilbo’s old... (full context)
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...diners follows Elrond and Arwen through to a great hall to enjoy singing and storytelling. Frodo is astonished to reconnect with Bilbo in the hall. They sit together happily as Bilbo... (full context)
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Next, Frodo and Sam tell Bilbo of all the eventful Shire news he has missed. For several... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 2
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The next day, Gandalf summons Frodo and Bilbo to the Council of Elrond. Many individuals from far-off lands have recently arrived... (full context)
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...shares the history of the Ring with the gathered Council. This is not news to Frodo, for Gandalf had already revealed much of it to him in his final visit to... (full context)
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...broken: / The crownless again shall be king.” Solving the final pieces of Boromir’s riddle, Frodo steps forward to present Isildur’s Bane, the One Ring.  (full context)
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...Gandalf and Elrond. Saruman desires to wield the Ring, and he prevented Gandalf from aiding Frodo on his journey to Rivendell by imprisoning him atop Saruman’s tower Orthanc. Gandalf was finally... (full context)
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Finally, Frodo—although he is very frightened—tells the Council that he will shoulder responsibility for delivering the Ring... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 3
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...Bilbo’s room. Merry and Pippin are offended that Elrond has confirmed that Sam will accompany Frodo the Ring-bearer, but that they have not been considered for the journey. Gandalf joins their... (full context)
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...will oppose Sauron’s nine Black Riders in a quest to destroy the Ring in Mordor. Frodo, Sam, and Gandalf are already decided. Elrond then names representatives of the Free peoples of... (full context)
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...his scabbard. The Sword that was Broken is reforged into Anduril, Flame of the West. Frodo also gains a new weapon when Bilbo gifts him the magical short sword Sting, whose... (full context)
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...of black crows that scour the landscape, likely looking for any sign of the Ring-bearer, Frodo. (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 4
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...pool beside the gate to attack the Fellowship. One of the monster’s great tentacles drags Frodo into the water, and it is only quick action with a knife from Sam that... (full context)
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...in Gandalf’s navigation, for the wizard has undertaken far mightier and more complex feats. However, Frodo feels certain of evil ahead, and the Ring weighs heavily around his neck. He also... (full context)
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...and rare metal called mithril, which is prized for its unparalleled beauty, lightness, and strength. Frodo realizes that the chain mail he wears beneath his clothes is made from the priceless... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 5
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...their way through the barricade. The Fellowship fights valiantly to stave off the attack, including Frodo and Sam, who bravely enter combat. However, Frodo is then speared in the side by... (full context)
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...up most of his energies to bring down the roof of the chamber. Delighted by Frodo’s uncanny escape from harm, the wizard then leads the Company down toward the lower halls,... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 6
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...Company toward the elf-forest of Lothlórien. He stops briefly in their haste to tend to Frodo’s injured torso and a head wound of Sam’s. Aragorn is amazed to discover that a... (full context)
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...prefer not to enter due to rumors of enchantment they have heard about the forest. Frodo is concerned that there is something that is following them, but he knows from Sting’s... (full context)
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...by Lórien guards who are led by an elf named Haldir. They know something of Frodo’s quest as Ring-bearer, and welcome their Northern cousin Legolas. The Fellowship is grateful to be... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 7
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...resting in the elf-forest, during which Legolas and Gimli begin to develop a strong friendship. Frodo uses these restful days to craft a song that memorializes Gandalf. Also of note is... (full context)
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Through her powers, Galadriel has also experienced the visions Frodo has seen. She comforts the Ring-bearer against the seemingly undefeatable might of Sauron, revealing that... (full context)
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Frodo is so awed by Galadriel’s power and wisdom that he offers her the Ring, feeling... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 8
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...to move east or west. Considering the Fellowship’s future path, Aragorn feels torn between protecting Frodo on a direct quest to Mordor—especially now that they have lost Gandalf—or accompanying Boromir to... (full context)
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...treasure forever as a token of the goodwill between dwarves and elves. Finally, Galadriel presents Frodo with a crystal phial of starlight. The Company now takes their leave, sailing out from... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 9
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...evening, Sam is startled awake from dozing in the boat he shares with Aragorn and Frodo. He thinks he has seen a log that is moving unnaturally quickly in the river,... (full context)
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...winged beast flies toward them. The orcs on the opposite bank shout with excitement while Frodo feels a chilling echo of his old shoulder wound. But suddenly Legolas fires a Lothlórien... (full context)
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...carved in the likeness of his ancestors—the brothers Isildur and Anarion, who jointly ruled Gondor. Frodo agrees with Aragorn’s plan, and Boromir decides to accompany them a little further. (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 10
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That night, while camping on the lawn at the foot of Amon Hen, Aragorn and Frodo see from Sting’s blade that there are orcs some way off. After breakfast the next... (full context)
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Meandering about the hill, Frodo finds himself climbing to a pretty spot on the hill of Amon Hen. While considering... (full context)
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They discuss the Ring-bearer’s looming decision, with Frodo admitting that he knows the difficult road he must take, although he is afraid of... (full context)
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Frodo races away from Boromir, eventually reaching the summit of Amon Hen. He stops fortuitously at... (full context)
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Meanwhile, in his wild lust to take the Ring from Frodo, Boromir has tripped onto his face. The fall shocks him into reality, and he cries... (full context)
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...catches up to Sam and tells him to follow him up Amon Hen to find Frodo. Using his head, though, Sam realizes that Frodo will not want to endanger any of... (full context)