The Fellowship of the Ring

The Fellowship of the Ring

by

J.R.R. Tolkien

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Fellowship of the Ring can help.

Samwise (Sam) Gamgee Character Analysis

A gardener like his father the Gaffer, Sam is a humble hobbit who is fiercely loyal to his friend and employer Frodo. Caught listening in to Gandalf and Frodo’s plans to take Sauron’s One Ring to Rivendell, Sam is eager to accompany Frodo despite the gardener’s hesitance in leaving the Shire for unknown lands. Sam proves himself a brave and trustworthy friend in his dedication to serving Frodo. Although he is not hired to accompany Frodo on the quest to Mordor, Sam continues to refer to his friend as “Mr. Frodo” and “Master,” making it clear that he holds Frodo in the highest regard and is willing to carry out Frodo’s wishes above his own. Sam goes to extraordinary lengths to keep his promise to himself, and to Gandalf and the elves, that he will not abandon his master. This is most prominent in The Fellowship’s closing scene, where Sam almost drowns in his devotion to staying at Frodo’s side through the perils of the quest to destroy the Ring. Beyond his steadfast loyalty, Sam is a lover of songs and myths and takes great delight in interacting with the elves of his childhood stories. His simple, earnest, and relentlessly pragmatic attitude is of great comfort to his fellow hobbits, and balances Frodo’s melancholy when the Ring-bearer becomes preoccupied by the task ahead.

Samwise (Sam) Gamgee Quotes in The Fellowship of the Ring

The The Fellowship of the Ring quotes below are all either spoken by Samwise (Sam) Gamgee or refer to Samwise (Sam) Gamgee. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Random House edition of The Fellowship of the Ring published in 1954.
Book 1, Chapter 1 Quotes

“But my lad Sam will know more about [Bilbo’s gold]. He’s in and out of Bag End. Crazy about the stories of the old days he is, and he listens to all Mr. Bilbo’s tales. Mr. Bilbo has learned him his letters –meaning no harm, mark you, and I hope no harm will come from it.

Elves and Dragons! I says to him. Cabbages and potatoes are better for me and you. Don’t go getting mixed up in the business of your betters, or you’ll land in trouble too big for you, I says to him. And I might say it to others,” he added with a look at the stranger and the miller.

But the Gaffer did not convince his audience. The legend of Bilbo’s wealth was now too firmly fixed in the minds of the younger generation of hobbits.

Page Number: 25
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile
Book 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

“A mortal, Frodo, who keeps one of the Great Rings, does not die, but he does not grow or obtain more life, he merely continues, until at last every minute is a weariness. And if he often uses the Ring to make himself invisible, he fades: he becomes in the end invisible permanently, and walks in the twilight under the eye of the dark power that rules the Rings. Yes, sooner or later – later, if he is strong or well-meaning to begin with, but neither strength nor good purpose will last – sooner or later the dark power will devour him.”

“How terrifying!” said Frodo. There was another long silence. The sound of Sam Gamgee cutting the lawn came in from the garden.

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 46
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Book 1, Chapter 3 Quotes

“[Bilbo] used often to say there was only one Road; and that it was like a great river: its springs were at every doorstep, and every path was its tributary. ‘It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out of your door,’ he used to say. ‘You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to. Do you realize that this is the very path that goes through Mirkwood, and that if you let it, it might take you to the Lonely Mountains or even further and to worse places?’ He used to say that on the path outside the front door at Bag End, especially after he had been out for a long walk."

Page Number: 72-3
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Book 1, Chapter 4 Quotes

“If you don’t come back, sir, then I shan’t, that’s certain,” said Sam. “Don’t you leave him! They said to me. Leave him! I said. I never mean to. I am going with him, if he climbs to the Moon, and if any of those Black Riders try to stop him, they’ll have Sam Gamgee to reckon with, I said. They laughed.”

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 85
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Book 2, Chapter 5 Quotes

“The world was young,
The mountains green,
No stain yet on the Moon was seen,
No words were laid on stream or stone
When Durin woke and walked alone.
He named the nameless hills and dells;
He drank from yet untasted wells;
He stooped and looked in Mirrormere,
And saw a crown of stars appear,
As gems upon a silver thread,
Above the shadow of his head.

The world was fair, the mountains tall,
In Elder days before the fall
Of mighty kings in Nargothrond
And Gondolin, who now beyond
The Western Seas have passed away:
The world was fair in Durin’s Day.

[…]

The world is grey, the mountains old,
The forge’s fire is ashen-cold;
No harp is wrung, no hammer falls:
The darkness dwells in Durin’s halls;
The shadow lies upon his tomb
In Moria, in Khazad-dûm.
But still the sunken stars appear
In dark and windless Mirrormere;
There lies his crown in water deep
Till Durin wakes again from sleep.”

Related Characters: Gimli (speaker), Samwise (Sam) Gamgee
Page Number: 307-8
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Book 2, Chapter 7 Quotes

“Many things I can command the Mirror to reveal,” she answered, “and to some I can show what they desire to see. But the Mirror will also show things unbidden, and those are often stranger and more profitable than things which we wish to behold. What you will see, if you leave the Mirror free to work, I cannot tell. For it shows things that were, and things that are, and things that yet may be. But which is it that he sees, even the wisest cannot always tell. Do you wish to look?”

Related Characters: Galadriel (speaker), Frodo Baggins, Samwise (Sam) Gamgee
Related Symbols: The Mirror of Galadriel
Page Number: 352
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Book 2, Chapter 8 Quotes

The travellers sat still without moving or speaking. On the green bank near to the very point of the Tongue the Lady Galadriel stood alone and silent. As they passed her they turned and their eyes watched her slowly floating away from them. For so it seemed to them: Lórien was slipping backward, like a bright ship masted with enchanted trees, sailing on to forgotten shores, while they sat helpless upon the margin of the grey and leafless world.

Page Number: 367
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Book 2, Chapter 10 Quotes

"But I must go at once. It's the only way."

"Of course it is," answered Sam. "But not alone. I'm coming too, or neither of us isn't going. I'll knock holes in all the boats first."

Frodo actually laughed. A sudden warmth and gladness touched his heart.

[…] “ So my plan is spoilt!” said Frodo. “It is no good trying to escape you. But I'm glad, Sam. I cannot tell you how glad. Come along! It is plain that we were meant to go together. We will go, and may the others find a safe road!”

Related Characters: Frodo Baggins (speaker), Samwise (Sam) Gamgee (speaker)
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 397
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Get the entire The Fellowship of the Ring LitChart as a printable PDF.
The fellowship of the ring.pdf.medium

Samwise (Sam) Gamgee Character Timeline in The Fellowship of the Ring

The timeline below shows where the character Samwise (Sam) Gamgee appears in The Fellowship of the Ring. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 2
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
...odd rumors about the outside world begin to circulate among common hobbits, and Frodo’s gardener, Sam, is particularly interested in stories of magical creatures that are interwoven with the rumors. (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
...Frodo and Gandalf sit by the open window of the study, where they can hear Sam cutting the hedges in the garden. Frodo presses the wizard to tell him information about... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
...to the window sill, the wizard reaches outside and hauls an eavesdropper into view—the gardener, Sam, has been eagerly listening to their conversation about magical creatures and objects. The loyal gardener... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 3
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
...since he was a child growing up in Buckland. Frodo has decided that he and Sam will travel to his new cottage and then quietly leave for Rivendell in order to... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
...Merry and Fatty drive a cart of belongings ahead to the cottage at Crickhollow. Frodo, Sam, and Pippin intend to follow on foot, enjoying the Shire’s beautiful countryside as they walk... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
...when the Rider suddenly moves away down the road. Frodo describes the stranger’s appearance to Sam and Pippin, who were hidden further back from him. Sam recalls that his father, the... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
...safe company for the night after hearing of their encounters with the Black Riders. While Sam is particularly delighted to meet the elves (he has long dreamed of meeting them), Gildor... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
Frodo, Sam, and Pippin wake the next morning to find that the elves have departed, leaving fresh... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
...piece together much of Frodo’s story, realizing that the three hobbits are in trouble. Frodo, Sam, and Pippin gratefully accept his offer to conceal them in his farm cart and drive... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
On the way, Frodo, Sam, and Pippin hear muffled hoof steps, but luckily it is Merry, not a Black Rider,... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 5
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
Merry leads Frodo, Sam, and Pippin onto the Buckleberry Ferry, the only way to cross the Brandywine River and... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
...direction, Fatty has helped set up the cottage in a warm and homely manner. Frodo, Sam and Pippin are relieved to take baths and eat supper. Frodo finally reveals his plan... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
...but he is thankful for their courage and friendship in accompanying him into danger. With Sam the chief investigator of the conspiracy, Merry has taken on the role of chief planner;... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
...Merry, and Pippin are overcome by an unnatural tiredness and fall asleep beside the river. Sam barely stays conscious, when two distinct noises startle him. Checking on his friends, he sees... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
Sam swiftly rescues Frodo from the water. Frodo immediately wakes up, but the two cannot free... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 7
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Frodo, Sam, Pippin, and Merry find cheer and comfort at the house of Tom Bombadil. Meeting Goldberry,... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
...to call for his help if they run into danger the next day. Frodo, Pippin, Sam, and Merry fall asleep, with no dreams to trouble their rest tonight. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 8
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
The next morning, Frodo, Merry, Sam, Pippin, and their ponies leave the house of Tom Bombadil and travel north into the... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
...a barrow-wight, but steels his nerve to try and formulate a plan. He can see Sam, Merry, and Pippin lying near him, wrapped in white clothing, gold, and jewelry, with a... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
...and Frodo is chilled to the bone. When he sees a long arm groping toward Sam from a passage behind the hobbits, Frodo panics even further and considers putting on the... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 9
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
...a bustling stopover for travelers. Upon entering the town by nightfall, Frodo, Pippin, Merry, and Sam are uneasy about the gatekeeper’s questions concerning their identities and business. The gatekeeper does not... (full context)
History and Myth Theme Icon
...something, but he cannot place it. After dinner, Merry rests in the rooms while Frodo, Sam, and Pippin venture into the common room for some company and news. They find a... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
...on the Ring. The crowd is amazed and then angry, moving away from Pippin and Sam in suspicion. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 10
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
Frodo, Sam, and Pippin return to their rooms and find that Strider is already there, while Merry... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
...reminding them he has not attacked them, despite having the skills to easily overpower them. Sam is scared by the sight of a great sword hanging from the Ranger’s belt, but... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
...for the hobbits to sleep in their own rooms, so they settle in another. Frodo, Sam, and Pippin fill Merry in about Strider and Gandalf’s letter while the Ranger and Nob... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 11
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
While Frodo, Pippin, Sam, and Merry prepare for sleep in Bree, back in Crickhollow Fatty is alarmed when he... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
The next morning, back in Bree, Strider wakes Frodo, Sam, Merry, and Pippin at first light. They discover that their original rooms have been ransacked,... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
After Strider finishes his stories, Frodo, Pippin, Merry, and Sam rest and keep watch. The hobbits suddenly feel a sense of dread creep over them,... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
...the edge of the campfire’s light. Merry and Pippin throw themselves down in terror, while Sam huddles at Frodo’s side. As five Black Riders advance on the Ring-bearer, Frodo cannot resist... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 1
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Frodo reunites with the ever-loyal Sam, and they accompany their friends to a feast-like dinner in the House of Elrond. Frodo... (full context)
History and Myth Theme Icon
Next, Frodo and Sam tell Bilbo of all the eventful Shire news he has missed. For several minutes they... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 2
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
...by someone seemingly weak who will be overlooked by the arrogant Dark Lord. The uninvited Sam then springs from up from a corner of the Council to exclaim that he will... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 3
History and Myth Theme Icon
...hobbits meet in Bilbo’s room. Merry and Pippin are offended that Elrond has confirmed that Sam will accompany Frodo the Ring-bearer, but that they have not been considered for the journey.... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
...oppose Sauron’s nine Black Riders in a quest to destroy the Ring in Mordor. Frodo, Sam, and Gandalf are already decided. Elrond then names representatives of the Free peoples of Middle... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 4
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
In the light of the morning, the Fellowship advances to the western gate of Moria. Sam is distraught to let Bill the Pony loose, but the packhorse cannot be taken through... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 5
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
...through the barricade. The Fellowship fights valiantly to stave off the attack, including Frodo and Sam, who bravely enter combat. However, Frodo is then speared in the side by a great... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 6
History and Myth Theme Icon
...briefly in their haste to tend to Frodo’s injured torso and a head wound of Sam’s. Aragorn is amazed to discover that a coat of precious mithril is what protected Frodo... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 7
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
...song that memorializes Gandalf. Also of note is the day that Galadriel shows Frodo and Sam her Mirror. The Lady of Lórien uses this magical basin filled with stream water to... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
...corrupt her into a Dark Queen, and she rejects Frodo’s offer. She leads Frodo and Sam back to the rest of the Company. (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 8
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
History and Myth Theme Icon
...bow and quiver of arrows for Legolas; and a box of magic Lórien earth for Sam. Galadriel then asks Gimli what he would request of the Lord and Lady. Having grown... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 9
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
On the fourth evening, Sam is startled awake from dozing in the boat he shares with Aragorn and Frodo. He... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 10
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
...requests an hour to reflect on the matter, walking away from the group to think. Sam notices that Boromir watches Frodo intently. (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
...take the Ring to Gondor, upon which the hobbit used the Ring to evade him. Sam realizes that Boromir is not telling the whole truth, and the panicked Company runs in... (full context)
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
Courage, Heroism, and Selflessness Theme Icon
Free Will, Fate, and Foresight Theme Icon
Aragorn easily catches up to Sam and tells him to follow him up Amon Hen to find Frodo. Using his head,... (full context)