The Fellowship of the Ring

The Fellowship of the Ring

by

J.R.R. Tolkien

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The antagonist and titular character of The Lord of the Rings series. The tyrannical Dark Lord Sauron of Mordor gained almost infinite power in the Second Age, his mastery over Middle-earth checked only by the courage of the armies led by the High Kings Gil-Galad and Elendil in the War of the last Alliance. He has now risen to power again and desires to repossess his One Ring, as this will allow him total domination of the Free Peoples of Middle-earth. In The Fellowship of the Ring, the power-hungry Sauron is an ever-potent threat who desperately searches for Frodo using his many servants. Elrond hopes that Sauron can be defeated if seemingly insignificant figures such as hobbits can slip into Mordor to destroy the Ring; Sauron is unlikely to suspect such a move, instead anticipating that a new adversary will challenge him by wielding the exceptional power of his Ring. Although Sauron never emerges in full form in the novel, he appears as a Great Eye when Frodo views him Galadriel’s mirror. By only acting through his dreadful agents such as the Black Riders, the villainous Dark Lord remains a mysterious, distant figure who invokes terror across Middle-earth and represents pure evil.

Sauron Quotes in The Fellowship of the Ring

The The Fellowship of the Ring quotes below are all either spoken by Sauron or refer to Sauron. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Random House edition of The Fellowship of the Ring published in 1954.
Book 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

“A mortal, Frodo, who keeps one of the Great Rings, does not die, but he does not grow or obtain more life, he merely continues, until at last every minute is a weariness. And if he often uses the Ring to make himself invisible, he fades: he becomes in the end invisible permanently, and walks in the twilight under the eye of the dark power that rules the Rings. Yes, sooner or later – later, if he is strong or well-meaning to begin with, but neither strength nor good purpose will last – sooner or later the dark power will devour him.”

“How terrifying!” said Frodo. There was another long silence. The sound of Sam Gamgee cutting the lawn came in from the garden.

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 46
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

"So now, when its master was awake once more and sending out his dark thought from Mirkwood, it abandoned Gollum. Only to be picked up by the most unlikely person imaginable: Bilbo from the Shire!

Behind that there was something else at work, beyond any design of the Ring-maker. I can put it no plainer than by saying that Bilbo was meant to find the Ring, and not by its maker. In which case you also were meant to have it. And that may be an encouraging thought."

Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 54-5
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Book 2, Chapter 10 Quotes

"We of Minas Tirith have been staunch through long years of trial. We do not desire the power of Wizard-lords, only strength to defend ourselves, strength in a just cause. And behold! in our need chance brings to light the Ring of Power. It is a gift, I say; a gift to the foes of Mordor. It is mad not to use it, to use the power of the Enemy against him. The fearless, the ruthless, these alone will achieve victory. What could not Aragorn do? Or if he refuses, why not Boromir? The Ring would give me power of Command. How I would drive the hosts of Mordor, and all men would flock to my banner!"

Related Characters: Boromir (speaker), Frodo Baggins, Gandalf the Grey, Aragorn / Strider, Sauron
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 36
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

The Misty Mountains were crawling like anthills: orcs were issuing out of a thousand holes. Under the boughs of Mirkwood there was deadly strife of Elves and Men and fell bests. The land of the Beornings was aflame; a cloud was over Moria; smoke rose on the borders of Lórien.

Horsemen were galloping on the grass of Rohan; wolves poured from Isengard. From the havens of Harad ships of war put out to sea; and out of the East Men were moving endlessly: swordsmen, spearmen, bowmen upon horses, chariots of chieftains and laden wains. All the power of the Dark Lord was in motion. Then turning south again he beheld Minas Tirith. Far away it seemed, and beautiful: white-walled, many towered, proud and fair upon its mountain-seat; its battlements glittered with steel, and its turrets were bright with many banners. Hope leaped in [Frodo's] heart. But against Minas Tirith was set another fortress, greater and more strong. Thither, eastward, unwilling his eye was drawn. It passed the ruined bridges of Osgiliath, the grinning gates of Minas Morgul, and the haunted Mountains, and it looked upon Gorgoroth, the valley of terror in the Land of Mordor.

Related Characters: Frodo Baggins, Sauron, Saruman the White
Related Symbols: The One Ring
Page Number: 391
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Get the entire The Fellowship of the Ring LitChart as a printable PDF.
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Sauron Character Timeline in The Fellowship of the Ring

The timeline below shows where the character Sauron appears in The Fellowship of the Ring. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 2
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...is none other than the One Ring, a powerful weapon created by the Dark Lord Sauron to dominate all of Middle-earth. The wizard began to suspect its true nature after observing... (full context)
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...that he has spent these last seventeen years searching for information about the Ring, which Sauron lost during his defeat in the War of the Last Alliance in the Second Age.... (full context)
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...to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.” Finally, Gandalf tells Frodo that Sauron has risen again and is searching for the Ring in the Shire—for the Dark Lord... (full context)
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...Frodo seeks advice from Gandalf about what to do in response to the threat of Sauron and his evil servants (the Black Riders) who are closing in on the Shire. When... (full context)
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...corrupt him and use its great power to distort him into an evil entity like Sauron. After calming himself, Gandalf reassures Frodo that although the wizard cannot take the burden of... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 7
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...and hobbits arrived to these lands. Tom is older even than the ancient Dark Lord Sauron. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 10
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...The hobbits distrust Strider’s strange story and appearance, although Frodo notes that a servant of Sauron would likely assume a “fairer” appearance than the rugged Ranger. Strider fills them in about... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 11
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...with a man. Together they were able to successfully destroy an ancient enemy who was Sauron’s master at the time. Lúthien then chose to give up her immortality so she could... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 12
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...evade four more Black Riders who appear from Frodo’s side to cut off his escape. Sauron’s nine servants race after the hobbit, and their power over Frodo and the Ring wills... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 2
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Glóin reveals that a servant of Sauron has recently approached the dwarves, offering an alliance and new rings of power in exchange... (full context)
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...visit to the Shire. Many others present are alarmed to hear that the Dark Lord Sauron has risen again and is searching for his One Ring—the only weapon he requires for... (full context)
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...in protecting the western lands from the wild folk of the east. Boromir confirms that Sauron has risen and is quickly gaining power, having allied himself with the cruel warriors of... (full context)
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...the direct descendant of Isildur, the ancient king of Gondor who cut the Ring from Sauron’s hand during the War of the Last Alliance. Bilbo also relays the Riddle of Strider... (full context)
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...of the Ring, followed by Gandalf’s account of how it is that the Dark Lord Sauron has come to rise again. The wizard also relates the story of why he came... (full context)
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...from the elves in Mirkwood. There are fears he will return to offer information to Sauron. Gandalf speaks once more to finish the final chapter in his tale. The Grey Wizard... (full context)
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...too unreliable in matters unrelated to his realm, and such a move would only delay Sauron’s inevitable rise to power. The Council also recognize they cannot destroy the Ring themselves—only the... (full context)
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...take the Ring to Gondor to wield its immense power against the gathering might of Sauron, but Elrond and Gandalf advise that the Ring will ultimately corrupt all but the most... (full context)
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Elrond and Gandalf agree that the only hope is to send messengers into Sauron’s stronghold of Mordor to destroy the Ring. Sauron is unlikely to suspect such a quest,... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 3
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Two months later, Elrond’s scouts return to Rivendell. They bear little news of Sauron and his servants, who have been quiet since the events at the Ford of Bruinen,... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 7
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...the visions Frodo has seen. She comforts the Ring-bearer against the seemingly undefeatable might of Sauron, revealing that she actively resists Sauron’s psychological attacks. During this conversation, Frodo becomes aware of... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 8
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...should take the Ring to Gondor so that they can use its power directly against Sauron. (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 9
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...day, their eighth day on the river, worried that Gollum may be feeding information to Sauron’s troops about their location. They run into some difficulties that night as they approach rapids,... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 10
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...there are signs of war. Frodo’s use of the Ring draws the malevolent attentions of Sauron’s great eye, and the hobbit only removes the Ring just in time to avoid being... (full context)