The Feminine Mystique

by

Betty Friedan

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Lucy Stone Character Analysis

– An abolitionist and campaigner for women’s rights. Stone was born in western Massachusetts and attended Oberlin College where she was forbidden from studying public speaking, so she practiced by herself in the woods. Stone, like other feminists had the reputation of being a “big, masculine woman” who wore boots, smoked a cigar, and swore like a sailor, but she was quite dainty in-person. Despite her initial objections to marriage, she married the reformer and suffragist, Henry Blackwell. Though she mentions most notable nineteenth-century American feminists, Friedan focuses on Stone as an example of a self-reliant woman who discovered her own desire for equal rights through her effort to free slaves. Stone was vilified in media, but she became an inspiration to other women who later joined the movement for suffrage.

Lucy Stone Quotes in The Feminine Mystique

The The Feminine Mystique quotes below are all either spoken by Lucy Stone or refer to Lucy Stone . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Domesticity and Femininity Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the W.W. Norton edition of The Feminine Mystique published in 1963.
Chapter 4 Quotes

Only men had the freedom to love, and enjoy love, and decide for themselves in the eyes of their God the problems of right and wrong. Did women want these freedoms because they wanted to be men? Or did they want them because they were also human?

Related Characters: Betty Friedan (speaker), Lucy Stone
Page Number: 82
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Feminine Mystique PDF

Lucy Stone Character Timeline in The Feminine Mystique

The timeline below shows where the character Lucy Stone appears in The Feminine Mystique. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4: The Passionate Journey
Domesticity and Femininity Theme Icon
Sex and Marriage Theme Icon
Work Theme Icon
Lucy Stone had the reputation of “a man-eating fury,” a label often given to feminists. She... (full context)
Domesticity and Femininity Theme Icon
Nature vs. Nurture Theme Icon
Sex and Marriage Theme Icon
Work Theme Icon
...marry until they had found identity and purpose as abolitionists and crusaders for women’s rights. Lucy Stone did not take her husband’s name. Some, such as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth... (full context)
Domesticity and Femininity Theme Icon
Nature vs. Nurture Theme Icon
Sex and Marriage Theme Icon
...their six children.” She became involved in the suffragist movement in 1868 when she met Lucy Stone (whom she found to be “sweet,” “earnest,” and, indeed, “womanly”) and realized that she... (full context)