The Golden Age

by

Joan London

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Jack Briggs Character Analysis

Elsa’s father and Margaret’s husband, Jack is a gruff and bad-tempered man. He’s unable to comfort his wife and unsympathetic to her requests that he take her to see Elsa more frequently. However, Elsa names her son after him, suggesting that during her adulthood they’ve arrived at a more comfortable relationship.

Jack Briggs Quotes in The Golden Age

The The Golden Age quotes below are all either spoken by Jack Briggs or refer to Jack Briggs . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Survival Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Europa edition of The Golden Age published in 2014.
3. Elsa Quotes

When at last she’d left the Isolation Ward and her parents were allowed to sit by her bed, they looked smaller to her, aged by the terror they had suffered, old, shrunken, ill-at-ease. Something had happened to her which she didn’t yet understand. As if she’d gone away and come back distant from everybody.

Related Characters: Elsa Briggs (speaker), Margaret Briggs, Jack Briggs
Related Symbols: The Isolation Ward
Page Number: 22
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Golden Age LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Golden Age PDF

Jack Briggs Character Timeline in The Golden Age

The timeline below shows where the character Jack Briggs appears in The Golden Age. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
9. The Dark Night
Parenthood and Growing Up Theme Icon
Isolation vs. Solitude Theme Icon
...of the night, having been dreaming that she was riding on the back of her father’s bike. They were going up a hill, with her father cursing and sweating, but Elsa... (full context)
14. Margaret in Her Garden
Survival Theme Icon
Parenthood and Growing Up Theme Icon
...over and asks for a lift to the hospital. She’s desperate to see Elsa because Jack, her husband, has just told her he can’t drive her to the hospital that Sunday.... (full context)
Parenthood and Growing Up Theme Icon
Isolation vs. Solitude Theme Icon
...mother about how she got there, who is taking care of the baby, and what Jack will say. Elsa feels as though she’s looking at her over-eager mother from a long... (full context)
Parenthood and Growing Up Theme Icon
As she walks to the train station, Margaret worries about facing Jack. She knows he’ll be deaf to her excuses and call her crazy, an accusation that... (full context)
Parenthood and Growing Up Theme Icon
Strength, Physicality, and Femininity Theme Icon
...up together,” Elsa as a child and Margaret as a parent. Margaret remembers visiting her father in a nursing home to announce her marriage to Jack. Her father had said he... (full context)
15. Christmas
Parenthood and Growing Up Theme Icon
...embarrass him by acting foreign or criticizing Australia. He wishes Elsa could stay, but her father picks her up in the morning. Frank watches Jack hovering over her and knows that... (full context)
30. The Separation
Survival Theme Icon
Isolation vs. Solitude Theme Icon
...Her family’s constant talking and complaining, and Margaret’s anxiety to please everyone, make her exhausted. Jack has converted the back verandah into a room so Elsa can have space to herself,... (full context)
31. The Visit
Parenthood and Growing Up Theme Icon
Strength, Physicality, and Femininity Theme Icon
Margaret nervously pours tea. Her clothes are all disarranged. Jack feels embarrassed for his wife, whom he sees as “a sort of animal.” To him,... (full context)
Parenthood and Growing Up Theme Icon
Isolation vs. Solitude Theme Icon
...from a Jewish baker in Perth, the kind of food they’re accustomed to from Europe. Jack Briggs notes that the cake must be expensive, but it’s a good offering and everyone... (full context)
Survival Theme Icon
Isolation vs. Solitude Theme Icon
...fence where hanging branches make a tiny room. Meyer notices them leaving but says nothing; Jack also notices and thinks to himself that “you can’t just switch a feeling off.” In... (full context)