The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

by

Ann Shaffer

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society can help.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society: Part 2: 27 Jul, 1946 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Juliet tells Sidney about her discovery that Elizabeth had an accomplice in sheltering a Todt worker. The man's name is Peter Sawyer. Juliet went to visit him; he's in a wheelchair and lives in a nursing home. Peter explained that the Germans let the Todt workers roam at night to find food, which meant they could feed them less. Peter had been living at home during the war when, one night, a Todt worker tried to steal from his garden. The boy, Lud Jaruzki, collapsed. He was too weak to stand and covered in vermin.
By finally giving a face and a name to one of the Todt workers, the novel further humanizes them and makes it clear that it was humans who built the bunkers on the island, not faceless automatons. Peter makes this same realization and chooses to accept Lud's humanity rather than dehumanize him by letting him die.
Themes
War, Hunger, and Humanity Theme Icon
Peter was shocked to see how young Lud was. He managed to move Lud into his house and remove some of the lice and maggots. He couldn't ask for help; helping Todt workers was a crime. Elizabeth was Peter's nurse and came the next day. She immediately set to work nursing Lud. Unfortunately, someone told on them and one night, the Germans burst in. Nobody knows what happened to Lud, but both Elizabeth and Peter were sent to St. Malo. They sent Peter back after a week, as the Germans didn't know what to do with a prisoner in a wheelchair. He believes that nobody knew that Elizabeth was helping with Lud.
Lud becomes yet another nameless and faceless victim of the war when Peter isn't able to track him down afterwards. This shows that one of the worst consequences of the war was that thousands of people like Lud simply disappeared and were erased from history. By preserving Lud in these letters and in Juliet's book, Juliet gives Lud a proper memorial and makes sure that others will know that someone in Guernsey cared for him.
Themes
Literature and Connection Theme Icon
War, Hunger, and Humanity Theme Icon
Dawsey writes Juliet from Louviers. He says that Remy is doing better, though she's still frail. Sister Touvier has cautioned him that Remy needs to stay warm and be around cheerful people. Dawsey knows that Amelia will keep Remy warm and fed, but Dawsey says that he knows he's not a particularly cheerful person. He suggests that Juliet spend time with Remy when they arrive, since she's so cheerful.
Again, Sister Touvier's suggestions indicate a belief that if Remy only spends time with happy people, she'll eventually forget what happened. However, Lud's story suggests that forgetting is actually a tragedy—telling these stories allows people to find closure.
Themes
Literature and Connection Theme Icon