The Hate U Give

Starr Carter Character Analysis

The novel’s protagonist, Starr is a sixteen-year-old black teenager who witnesses the shooting of her unarmed friend, Khalil. Starr lives in the primarily black, lower-class neighborhood of Garden Heights but attends Williamson Prep, a wealthy, predominantly white school in another town. Starr constantly feels pulled between two versions of herself—Williamson Starr and Garden Heights Starr—and changes her speech patterns out of fear that her classmates will think she is “ghetto.” Traumatized by Khalil’s death, Starr is initially reluctant to speak up about the shooting and doesn’t tell Maya and Hailey, her closest friends at school, about what she saw. The shooting also makes her reevaluate her relationship with Chris, her boyfriend from a white, wealthy family. Starr feels immense guilt for not being a part of Khalil’s life in the months before he died. She starts a Tumblr blog showing the world the side of him she knew, and, emboldened by her family and by activist April Oprah, eventually decides to give a television interview to tell the world what happened. Despite witnessing Khalil’s death, as well as and that of her friend Natasha at age ten, Starr tries her best to live a normal life; she loves basketball, sneakers, and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, which she feels echoes her own experience as a student at Williamson. As the media peddles more narratives about Khalil being a thug, however, Starr becomes more engaged in the fight for racial justice, going so far as to climb on a police car and address the crowd at riots following the indictment verdict in Khalil’s case. In the end of the novel, she lists the names of many black individuals killed at the hands of police, and promises to never stay silent again.

Starr Carter Quotes in The Hate U Give

The The Hate U Give quotes below are all either spoken by Starr Carter or refer to Starr Carter . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism and Police Brutality  Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Harper Collins edition of The Hate U Give published in 2017.
Chapter 1 Quotes

As long as I play it cool and keep to myself, I should be fine. The ironic thing is though, at Williamson I don't have to “play it cool” — I’m cool by default because I'm one of the only black kids there. I have to earn coolness in Garden Heights, and that's more difficult than buying retro Jordans on release day.

Funny how it works with white kids though. It's dope to be black until it's hard to be black.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker)
Page Number: 11
Explanation and Analysis:
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Garden Heights has been a battlefield for the past two months over some stupid territory wars. I was born a “queen” ‘cause Daddy used to be a King Lord. But when he left the game, my street royalty status ended. But even if I’d grown up in it, I wouldn't understand fighting over streets nobody owns.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Maverick Carter
Page Number: 17
Explanation and Analysis:
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Listen! The Hate U-the letter U-Give Little Infants Fucks Everybody. T-H-U-G L-I-F-E. Meaning what society give us as youth, it bites them in the ass when we wild out. Get it?

Related Characters: Khalil Harris (speaker), Starr Carter
Page Number: 17
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 2  Quotes

The other talk was about what to do if a cop stopped me. … “Starr-Starr, you do whatever they tell you to do," he said. "Keep your hands visible. Don't make any sudden moves. Only speak when they speak to you."

I knew it must've been serious. Daddy has the biggest mouth of anybody I know, and if he said to be quiet, I needed to be quiet.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Maverick Carter (speaker)
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 4 Quotes

But I swear I wanna cuss Khalil out. How he could sell the very stuff that took his momma from him? Did he realize that he was taking somebody else's momma from them? Did he realize that if he does become a hashtag, some people will only see him as a drug dealer?

He was so much more than that.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Khalil Harris, Brenda Harris
Page Number: 64
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 5 Quotes

Williamson Starr doesn't use slang—if a rapper would say it, she doesn't say it, even if her white friends do. Slang makes them cool. Slang makes her “hood.” Williamson Starr holds her tongue when people piss her off so nobody will think she's the “angry black girl.” Williamson Starr is approachable. No stank-eyes, side-eyes, none of that. Williamson Starr is nonconfrontational. Basically, Williamson Starr doesn't give anyone a reason to call her ghetto.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker)
Page Number: 71
Explanation and Analysis:
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Hailey texted me immediately after, freaking out. I thought it was because she couldn't believe someone would do that to a kid. No. She couldn't believe I would reblog such an awful picture.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Hailey Grant
Page Number: 77
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 6 Quotes

My voice is changing already. It always happens around “other” people, whether I'm at Williamson or not. I don't talk like me or sound like me. I choose every word carefully and make sure I pronounce them well. I can never, ever let anyone think I'm ghetto.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Detective Gomez, Detective Wilkes
Page Number: 95
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 7 Quotes

“Hustle! Pretend the ball is some fried chicken. Bet you'll stay on it then.”

Related Characters: Hailey Grant (speaker), Starr Carter
Page Number: 111
Explanation and Analysis:
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The drug dealer. That's how they see him. It doesn't matter that he's suspected of doing it. “Drug dealer” is louder than “suspected” ever will be.

If it's revealed that I was in the car, what will that make me? The thug ghetto girl with the drug dealer? What will my teachers think about me? My friends? The whole fucking world, possibly?

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Khalil Harris, Hailey Grant, Maya Yang
Page Number: 113
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 10 Quotes

“Drugs come from somewhere, and they're destroying our community," he says. “You got folks like Brenda, who think they need them to survive, and then you got the Khalils who think they need to sell them to survive. The Brendas can't get jobs unless they're clean, and they can't pay for rehab unless they got jobs. When the Khalils get arrested for selling drugs, they either spend most of their life in prison, another billion-dollar industry, or they have a hard time getting a real job and probably start selling drugs again. That’s the hate they’re giving us, baby, a system designed against us. That’s ‘Thug Life.’”

Related Characters: Maverick Carter (speaker), Starr Carter , Khalil Harris, Brenda Harris
Page Number: 170
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 12 Quotes

[Tupac] explains Thug Life like Khalil said he did. The Hate U Give Little Infants Fucks Everybody. ‘Pac spells out “Fucks” because that kid is looking dead in his face. When Khalil told me what it meant I kinda understood it. I really understand it now.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Khalil Harris
Page Number: 205
Explanation and Analysis:
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“That's the so-called gun,” Ms. Ofrah explains. “Officer Cruise claims he saw it in the car door, and he assumed Khalil was reaching for it. The handle was thick enough, black enough, for him to assume it was a gun.”

“And Khalil was black enough,” Daddy adds.

A hairbrush. Khalil died over a fucking hairbrush.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Maverick Carter (speaker), April Ofrah (speaker), Khalil Harris, One-Fifteen / Officer Brian Cruise
Related Symbols: Khalil’s Hairbrush
Page Number: 217
Explanation and Analysis:
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“I've tried to forget it, but I remember everything. The shots, the look on Natasha's face. They never caught the person who did it. I guess it didn't matter enough. But it did matter. She mattered.” I look at Ms. Ofrah, but I can barely see her for all the tears. “And I want everyone to know that Khalil mattered too.”

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Khalil Harris, Natasha, April Ofrah
Page Number: 219
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 14 Quotes

Funny. Slave masters thought they were making a difference in black people's lives too. Saving them from their wild African ways. Same shit, different century. I wish people like them would stop thinking that people like me need saving.

Page Number: 245-246
Explanation and Analysis:
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That's the problem. We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What’s the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Hailey Grant, Maya Yang
Page Number: 252
Explanation and Analysis:
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“I knew that boy. Watched him grow up with you. He was more than any bad decision he made,” he says. “I hate that I let myself fall into that mind-set of trying to rationalize his death. And at the end of the day, you don’t kill someone for opening a car door. If you do, you shouldn't be a cop.”

Related Symbols: Khalil’s Hairbrush
Page Number: 256
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 16 Quotes

Ms. Ofrah says this interview is the way I fight. When you fight, you put yourself out there, not caring who you hurt or if you'll get hurt.

So I throw one more blow, right at One-Fifteen.

“I’d ask him if he wished he shot me too.”

Page Number: 290
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 17 Quotes

Being two different people is so exhausting. I've taught myself to speak with two different voices and only say certain things around certain people. I've mastered it. As much as I say I don't have to choose which Starr I am with Chris, maybe without realizing it, I have to an extent. Part of me feels like I can't exist around people like him.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Chris
Page Number: 301
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 19 Quotes

“Brave doesn't mean you're not scared, Starr," she says. "It means you go on even though you're scared. And you're doing that."

Related Characters: Lisa Carter (speaker), Starr Carter
Page Number: 331
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 20 Quotes

Hailey hands me two pictures. One is Khalil's thugshot, as Daddy calls it. One of the pictures they've shown on the news. Hailey printed it off the internet. Khalil wears a smirk, gripping a handful of money and throwing up a sideways peace sign.

The other picture, he's twelve. I know because I'm twelve in it too. It's my birthday party at this laser tag place downtown. Khalil's on one side of me, shoveling strawberry cake into his mouth, and Hailey's on my other side, grinning for the camera along with me.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Khalil Harris, Hailey Grant
Page Number: 339
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 21 Quotes

Chris and Maya walk through the gate, and my stomach gets all jittery. I should be used to my two worlds colliding, but I never know which Starr I should be. I can use some slang, but not too much slang, some attitude, but not too much attitude, so I'm not a “sassy black girl.” I have to watch what I say and how I say it, but I can't sound “white.”

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), Chris, Maya Yang
Page Number: 357
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 24 Quotes

The bullhorn is as heavy as a gun. Ironic since Ms. Ofrah said to use my weapon.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker), April Ofrah
Page Number: 411
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 26 Quotes

He said Thug Life stood for “The Hate U Give Little Infants Fucks Everybody.” We did all that stuff last night because we were pissed, and it fucked all of us. Now we have to somehow un-fuck everybody.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker)
Page Number: 432
Explanation and Analysis:
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It would be easy to quit if it was just about me, Khalil, that night, and that cop. It's about way more than that though. It's about Seven. Sekani. Kenya. DeVante.

It's also about Oscar.

Aiyana.

Trayvon.

Rekia.

Michael.

Eric.

Tamir.

John.

Ezell.

Sandra.

Freddie.

Alton.

Philando.

It's even about that little boy in 1955 who nobody recognized at first—Emmett.

Related Characters: Starr Carter (speaker)
Page Number: 443
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
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Starr Carter Character Timeline in The Hate U Give

The timeline below shows where the character Starr Carter appears in The Hate U Give. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Dueling Identities and Double Consciousness  Theme Icon
Community and Loyalty Theme Icon
Starr Carter begrudgingly attends Big D’s spring break party in Garden Heights. She feels like neither... (full context)
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Starr describes Kenya, who is beautiful and fashionable. She’s the only person Starr really hangs out... (full context)
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Kenya walks away to get another drink, leaving Starr alone and uncomfortable with so many unfamiliar faces. Starr notes that at Williamson, being one... (full context)
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Suddenly shots ring out at the party. Starr worries about where Kenya is, but Khalil grabs Starr’s hand and the two run to... (full context)
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...noting that a fight between rival gangs—the King Lords and Garden Disciples—probably caused the gunshots. Starr notes that Garden Heights has been in the grip of “stupid territory wars” for some... (full context)
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Khalil turns on the radio and Tupac comes on. Starr thinks Tupac is old and irrelevant. Khalil explains Tupac’s importance to Starr, noting that he... (full context)
The Cycle of Poverty and Crime Theme Icon
Starr calls Khalil out for selling drugs. He defends himself by saying his grandmother lost her... (full context)
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Seven texts Starr, worried about where she is. Starr and Khalil laugh about Seven’s overprotectiveness and reminisce about... (full context)
Chapter 2 
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Starr remembers “the talk” her parents gave her when she was twelve about how to behave... (full context)
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Back in the present, the officer approaches the car and Starr hopes Khalil has had “the talk” too. Khalil is immediately skeptical of what “this fool”... (full context)
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Starr remembers Maverick’s instructions to get a good look at the cop’s face, and notes that... (full context)
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...where he is and not to move while he walks back to his patrol car. Starr mentally recites the lessons her parents taught her, including that it’s not smart to make... (full context)
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One-Fifteen shoots Khalil three times in the back. Starr watches in horror as blood spurts from her friend and Khalil drops to the ground.... (full context)
Chapter 3
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While waiting for her parents to pick her up, Starr notes that officials “leave Khalil’s body in the street like an exhibit.” The police rummage... (full context)
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A distraught Maverick and Lisa arrive and take Starr home. They tenderly put her to bed. The following morning Starr wakes up and thinks... (full context)
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Starr walks to the kitchen, nothing that the Carter home has pictures of Malcom X alongside... (full context)
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Seven asks why they shot Khalil, and Starr responds that she and Khalil didn’t do anything wrong, and that Khalil did not have... (full context)
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Starr wishes she could stay home to watch her favorite show, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,... (full context)
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Starr feeds the family pit bull, Brickz, who she notes is sweet to anyone unless they... (full context)
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Starr thinks about the texts she has not responded to from her boyfriend Chris, who is... (full context)
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...the store and asks if “her” brother — not “our,” a verbal tic that annoys Starr — stayed with the Carters the previous night. Kenya then expresses sympathy for Khalil’s death,... (full context)
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Kenya and Starr walk to get food from Mr. Reuben’s, a kindly shopkeeper who remembers all his regulars’... (full context)
Chapter 4
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Starr overhears her parents arguing with Carlos, who is Lisa’s brother and a detective, about Khalil’s... (full context)
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Starr enters the room and Carlos asks if she would be willing to talk to some... (full context)
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Starr thinks the real reason her father and uncle fight is because of Maverick’s insecurity and... (full context)
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On Sunday morning Starr and her parents visit Mrs. Rosalie, Khalil’s grandmother who also helped care for Lisa when... (full context)
The Cycle of Poverty and Crime Theme Icon
...well-to-do aunt, is at the house as well. She and Lisa were very close when Starr was little, and Khalil used to say he wished Tammy were his mother instead of... (full context)
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Mrs. Rosalie tells Starr that she was the best friend Khalil ever had, which makes Starr feel at once... (full context)
Chapter 5
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Lisa drives Starr and Sekani to Williamson Prep, passing by Carlos’s gated neighborhood on the way. Starr wonders... (full context)
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Starr greets her friend Maya, an Asian American student at Williamson whose boyfriend, Ryan, is the... (full context)
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Before first period, Starr runs into Chris, whom she has been ignoring since he took out a condom while... (full context)
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Though it feels like a betrayal, Starr is relieved that no one at school mentions Khalil. At the end of the day... (full context)
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...disheveled with dirty clothes and uncombed hair. She is beside herself over Khalil’s death, but Starr judges her in her grief, pointing out that she was not there for her son ... (full context)
Chapter 6
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Lisa reminds an extremely anxious Starr to breathe as they arrive at the police station for Starr’s interview with the detectives,... (full context)
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Gomez and Wilkes ask Starr whether Khalil seemed “irate” after being pulled over by One-Fifteen, and assert that he was... (full context)
Chapter 7
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At Williamson, fried chicken is served for lunch in the cafeteria, much to Starr’s delight. In gym class, Starr sits between Hailey and Maya and scoffs at a girls... (full context)
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Hailey drags Starr and Maya onto the basketball court to play. Starr doesn’t really want to join in... (full context)
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...if the Khalil they heard about on the news was the same Khalil who attended Starr’s birthday parties as a child, and if that is why she is behaving weirdly. Hailey... (full context)
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Hailey then asks Starr if she is upset because of the anniversary of Natasha’s death, reminding Starr that the... (full context)
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Starr goes to the headmaster’s office instead of the shrink’s, and fakes menstrual cramps to convince... (full context)
Chapter 8
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...the day of Khalil’s funeral. The parking lot is packed when the Carters arrive, and Starr sees multiple people dressed in “RIP Khalil” t-shirts. The Carters wear suits and dresses. Starr... (full context)
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The Cycle of Poverty and Crime Theme Icon
Pastor Eldridge greets the family and looks at Starr with pity. Starr feels her legs trembling and a wave of nausea as her family... (full context)
Racism and Police Brutality  Theme Icon
Dueling Identities and Double Consciousness  Theme Icon
...the “RIP Khalil” t-shirt and exhibiting an air of authority directs people to their seats. Starr feels like a “phony” when her family is seated in the front row of the... (full context)
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...the back of the church. Iesha wears heavy makeup and a skimpy black dress, and Starr can sense the tension between her parents in that moment. Iesha, a prostitute, is the... (full context)
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Starr is appalled to think that Khalil could have become a King Lord, knowing how much... (full context)
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...Seven and Sekani to be a part of the march, but Lisa insists on taking Starr home. April Ofrah approaches the Carters and offers to help Starr with legal representation. She... (full context)
Chapter 9
Community and Loyalty Theme Icon
The Cycle of Poverty and Crime Theme Icon
...at his store to protect it from rioters and instructs his family to stay indoors. Starr compares her neighborhood to a “war zone.” Upon hearing the sound of machine gunfire Lisa... (full context)
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...The police appear on screen and say they have no reason to arrest One-Fifteen. To Starr’s anger, the news makes it sound as though “it’s Khalil’s fault he died,” alleging there... (full context)
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That night, Starr has a vivid nightmare about Natasha’s death.  The next morning Seven bangs on her bedroom... (full context)
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Starr and Seven play basketball, but then two young teens in the colors of the Garden... (full context)
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Starr initially thinks DeVante is cute, until he calls her “li’l mamma”; Starr hates nicknames. Seven... (full context)
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Maverick pulls up to the basketball court, furious that Starr and Seven left the house without telling him or Lisa. He rants as he drives... (full context)
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Later that day, Starr watches Maverick examine his roses, which are looking dry despite his frequent watering. Lisa drives... (full context)
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...arrive at Carlos’s house, which is in a gated community close to where Chris lives. Starr notices how peaceful and safe everything is there, with joggers and kids playing in the... (full context)
Chapter 10
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Lisa and Starr spend the night at Carlos’s to avoid the riots, but protests continue to fill the... (full context)
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Back at their house, Maverick asks Starr to hang out with him that day, promising her ice cream and the chance to ... (full context)
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Starr gets into the car with Maverick, who plays Tupac as he drives. Starr lightheartedly mocks... (full context)
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Maverick continues to push Starr to explain how drugs, racism, and a lack of opportunity trap communities like Garden Heights... (full context)
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After listening to her father’s words, Starr realizes that the protests and anger in her community are much bigger than Khalil. She... (full context)
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When Maverick and Starr arrive back at the store they find DeVante.  It becomes clear that he is trying... (full context)
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...store. While showing him how to put price stickers on items, DeVante opens up to Starr about feeling helpless as he watched Dalvin die—a feeling Starr knows all too well. Maverick... (full context)
Chapter 11
Racism and Police Brutality  Theme Icon
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The next day at Williamson things are eerily quiet. Starr asks what is going on, and Hailey reveals that her brother, Remy, is starting a... (full context)
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After school, Starr sees Mr. Lewis standing outside Maverick’s store and preparing to give an on-camera interview. Maverick... (full context)
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...Larry, who is black, accuses Maverick of harassing Mr. Lewis, a claim both calmly deny. Starr notes that Mr. Lewis has his hands by his sides, and must have had “the... (full context)
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...comforts his little brother. Tim says that the officers humiliated him in order to scare Starr off from speaking up; news had spread that she was the witness. (full context)
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Kenya overhears this and calls Starr a coward for not speaking up more on behalf of Khalil. She says that if... (full context)
Chapter 12
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...Lisa have made up, and Maverick watches his wife as she works on the computer. Starr assumes she’s on Facebook updating her out-of-town relatives, but wonders how she could post positive... (full context)
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Back in her bedroom, Starr checks on the new Tumblr blog she has started called The Khalil I Know. It... (full context)
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Starr brings her old laptop to Seven’s room, where he and DeVante are playing video games.... (full context)
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Starr hears Lisa speaking in her “other” voice on the phone. She is speaking to the... (full context)
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The next morning Kenya finally texts Starr back about the Tumblr, saying simply “its aight.” Starr is happy, knowing this is a... (full context)
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Lisa take Starr to the Just Us for Justice office, which occupies an old Taco Bell. Maverick used... (full context)
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...her colleagues are out leading discussions and protests on the street where Khalil was murdered. Starr is taken aback by how easily Ms. Ofrah uses the word “murder” to describe Khalil’s... (full context)
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Ms. Ofrah calls Starr brave for speaking to the police, though Starr does not believe it about herself. Ms.... (full context)
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Ms. Ofrah tells Starr that One-Fifteen’s father will be giving a television interview on his son’s behalf. Realizing the... (full context)
Chapter 13
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...Garden Heights, Maverick, though angry, softens, and brings DeVante to Carlos’s house—a move that surprises Starr, since Maverick never goes to Carlos’s house with them. (full context)
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Upon arrival, Starr is surprised to see Carlos at home in sweats in the middle of a workday.... (full context)
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Starr hears a familiar laugh at the front door, and sees Chris walk into Carlos’s house;... (full context)
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Lisa drags Maverick out to the patio, but Starr can still hear everything they say as they argue about Chris being white. Lisa then... (full context)
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...feeling awkward, says he should go and leaves. DeVante comes into the kitchen and teases Starr about dating a white boy, whom he jokingly calls “Justin Bieber.” He then says any... (full context)
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To Starr’s surprise, DeVante says that Khalil used to talk about her. He also asserts that Khalil... (full context)
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Starr begins to explain that if only the world knew the reason why Khalil was selling... (full context)
Chapter 14
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Needing to clear her head, Starr leaves and walks to Maya’s house nearby. Maya is excited to see Starr, but Hailey,... (full context)
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...parts of Garden Heights, dismissing it as a neighborhood “notorious for gangs and drug dealers.” Starr is angry that none of the good parts of her neighborhood are highlighted, such as... (full context)
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...that his son “loved” working in Garden Heights and “wanted to make a difference”—an attitude Starr compares to slave masters thinking “they were making a difference in black people’s lives.” (full context)
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...the shooting, One-Fifteen’s father paints a picture of Khalil’s death that is nothing like what Starr experienced. He portrays both Starr and Khalil as dangerous threats who cursed at One-Fifteen, resisted... (full context)
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After the interview Hailey expresses sympathy for One-Fifteen, asserting that “his life matters too.” Starr is appalled by her sympathy, believing it rightly belongs to Khalil’s family. She angrily points... (full context)
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After Hailey has gone, Maya says that Hailey was lying: she did unfollow Starr’s Tumblr because she was tired of seeing, as Hailey put it, the “black stuff.” As... (full context)
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Maya tells Starr that after Thanksgiving their freshman year, Hailey asked Maya, who is Chinese, whether her family... (full context)
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Starr walks back to Carlos’s house, where she finds her uncle having a beer outside. She... (full context)
Chapter 15
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The following morning Lisa takes Starr to IHOP, but Starr barely touches her food. Lisa expresses her anger about the previous... (full context)
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Starr starts to open up about the tension with Hailey, though she leaves out the specific... (full context)
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Later that day Starr meets the DA, a white woman named Karen Monroe who apologizes for taking so long... (full context)
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Maverick and Starr head back to the store together. There, Maverick asks Starr what she sees in Chris—and... (full context)
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...asks for DeVante’s whereabouts. Maverick denies knowing where he is. King then says he knows Starr is the witness the news is talking about, and that she better “keep her mouth... (full context)
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Starr and Maverick pick up food from Reuben’s for dinner on the way home. At dinner... (full context)
Chapter 16
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Five weeks have passed since the shooting, and April Ofrah has arranged for Starr to do an interview with national news anchor Diane Carey. A limo picks the Carters... (full context)
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The Carters arrive at the studio, and the producers film some clips of Starr walking and talking with Diane Carey. Starr feels odd, remembering watching Carey on the news... (full context)
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Though Ms. Ofrah had warned Starr not to go into too many details, and in spite of King’s threats, Starr hears... (full context)
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Starr continues, telling the world that Khalil was not in a gang. Thinking of DeVante, Starr... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...the most watched in the network’s history, and there is an outpouring of support for Starr online. Kenya texts her approval, but also says King is angry that Starr effectively snitched... (full context)
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The Saturday of prom arrives, and Starr is sitting in a Rolls Royce with Chris. He behaves coldly towards Starr, answering her... (full context)
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Maya finds Starr and says that she asked Hailey about the “cat” comment, but Hailey refused to apologize.... (full context)
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Chris continues to behave coldly towards Starr all evening, however, to the point that Starr storms out of the ballroom and back... (full context)
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Still in the car, Starr opens up about her life in Garden Heights, as well as witnessing Natasha’s death and... (full context)
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...in front of the crowd and raps The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song for Starr. They dance the night away, and Starr doesn’t think about Khalil or Natasha. She calls... (full context)
Chapter 18
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Maverick and Lisa take Starr and her brothers on a “trip.” At first they think they are going to Carlos’s... (full context)
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That night—the night before Starr testifies in front of the grand jury—the Carters watch a basketball game together back at... (full context)
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...the attack; he believes it is no coincidence that it took place the night before Starr’s testimony. He argues with Carlos, who defends the police and says many want justice in... (full context)
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Starr shouts that she refuses to testify anymore. In response, Maverick makes her, Sekani, and Seven... (full context)
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...behind the attack in the first place. Maverick accuses him of not wanting to protect Starr because he is scared about how working with gangbangers will look to his fellow cops.... (full context)
Chapter 19
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The next morning Starr wakes up to the smell of bacon. Lisa and Pam have cooked breakfast for the... (full context)
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The King Lords drive the Carters to the courthouse. Starr flashes back to many years earlier, when Carlos drove her, Seven, and a sobbing Lisa... (full context)
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...a media circus has surrounded the courthouse. A security guard leads the Carters through, but Starr must go into the courtroom alone. Before she does so, Lisa tells Starr how proud... (full context)
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Starr is sworn in and begins her testimony in front of the grand jury. She gets... (full context)
Chapter 20
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It has been two weeks since Starr talked to the grand jury and eight weeks since Khalil’s death. Seven drives Starr to... (full context)
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Starr sees Maya and Hailey talking outside Hailey’s locker. Hailey has a smug expression on her... (full context)
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Hailey calls Starr a liar for pretending not to know Khalil, and demands an apology for being called... (full context)
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...and the four get suspended. They are not expelled, because the headmaster takes pity on Starr “given the circumstances.” Lisa scolds Seven and Starr, saying they behaved in the way the... (full context)
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...infighting has only given the cops more power to do whatever they want. Much to Starr’s surprise, the different gang members slap palms. (full context)
Chapter 21
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When Maya and Chris arrive, Starr feels her Garden Heights and Williamson worlds colliding, and worries about acting too “black” or... (full context)
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Starr is eating in the kitchen when a call comes through from the security guard of... (full context)
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...in the house, Seven is sobbing uncontrollably. Lisa comforts him, and Maverick instructs Kenya and Starr to go back outside. Starr realizes how awkward it is to be sitting with Kenya,... (full context)
Chapter 22
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...weeks have passed since Khalil’s death. The Carters have moved into their new house, and Starr notes that in her new, safer neighborhood she can just tell her parents she is... (full context)
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Needing to feel “normal,” Starr texts Chris, who quickly picks her up in his Benz. They drive to Chris’s house,... (full context)
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Looking at all the finery, Starr feels more than ever that they should not be together; their backgrounds are simply too... (full context)
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Seven calls, demanding to know where Starr is. He then says DeVante is missing. Starr’s stomach drops, and she and Chris agree... (full context)
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Starr realizes this is Chris’s first time seeing Garden Heights, and worries about what he thinks... (full context)
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Iesha smirks when Seven asks her for help, and scoffs at his calling her “momma.” Starr knows that if she calls for King, they are in deep trouble. Her eyes flick... (full context)
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As the group rushes out, Starr notices Iesha dancing in King’s face and pushing him down seductively when he tries to... (full context)
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...drives away, a Tupac song comes on the radio. He raps about making changes, and Starr thinks that Khalil was right about his continued relevance. When the song ends, an announcement... (full context)
Chapter 23
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The car is silent as Seven drives to his grandmother’s house. Starr can’t understand what went wrong, or why Khalil didn’t matter enough for his death to... (full context)
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...as things are about to get “wild,” but Chris says he wants to stay with Starr and for everyone to know the indictment decision was wrong. (full context)
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Chris feels out of place in the crowd, and realizes this must be how Starr and Seven feel at Williamson. They climb atop a bus for a better view, and... (full context)
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...a tipping point. People start smashing the windows of a nearby McDonalds, the same one Starr remembers eating at with her parents. She screams for them to stop, but the building... (full context)
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...in the car, DeVante defends the rioters by saying peaceful protests haven’t worked, and echoing Starr’s words that because the world doesn’t care about them, they shouldn’t care about the world.... (full context)
Chapter 24
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...unfamiliar street, the group gets out to walk to a gas station. As they walk, Starr points out to Chris her old apartment building and the Taco Bell she used visit... (full context)
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April Ofrah’s voice on a bullhorn snaps Starr out of her daze. She is leading the hairbrush chant as the police continue to... (full context)
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Ms. Ofrah steps down and approaches Starr, who begs her not to tell Lisa she was at the riots. Starr says she... (full context)
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Ms. Ofrah then tells Starr to fire her, so that what she does next are the actions of an activist... (full context)
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Police throw tear gas at the protestors. Starr volleys it back and even more chaos erupts as everyone scatters. Starr manages to find... (full context)
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...except those with “black owned” spray-painted across the front. They arrive at Maverick’s store, and Starr gives Goon the keys.  Goons directs everyone inside and starts grabbing jugs of milk from... (full context)
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Starr checks her phone, and has a lot of worried and angry voicemails from Lisa, who... (full context)
Chapter 25
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...group tries to get out the back door, but it’s locked, and Goon still has Starr’s keys. Smoke fills the aisles and they struggle to breathe. Mr. Lewis sees them from... (full context)
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...focused on King because he started the fire. King calls him a liar, but to Starr’s immense surprise, Maverick speaks up to confirm Mr. Lewis’s story. Starr is shocked that her... (full context)
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An ambulance arrives and tends to DeVante. Starr and Chris hold hands, and Starr is grateful that they went through the craziness of... (full context)
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...Lisa ask where they’ve all been all night. Maverick is impressed when he hears that Starr threw tear gas, though he half-heartedly scolds her in front of Lisa. Maverick admits that... (full context)
Chapter 26
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The next morning, April Ofrah calls to apologize for putting Starr in a dangerous situation, but also says she thinks Starr has a future in activism.... (full context)
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Hailey texts Starr to say that she is sorry—for the verdict and that Starr is upset with her.... (full context)
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Starr walks down the hallway, noting that she has yet to get used to the layout... (full context)
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Maverick calls Starr “lil Black Panther” and points to the newspaper: a photo of Starr with a canister... (full context)
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Starr worries what people will think about them leaving Garden Heights instead of staying to fix... (full context)
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Kenya arrives and says she heard her father started the fire. She also tells Starr that King beat Iesha so badly that she is in the hospital, but she will... (full context)
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Kenya then apologizes to Starr for always calling Seven “my” brother instead of “our” brother. She says she felt insecure... (full context)
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Starr says the world called Khalil a thug, but she will remember him as a hazel-eyed... (full context)