The Haunting of Hill House

by

Shirley Jackson

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Eleanor Vance Character Analysis

Eleanor Vance is the isolated, fanciful, and disturbed protagonist of The Haunting of Hill House. A thirty-two-year-old woman who has spent the last eleven years—the majority of her adult life—caring alone for her invalid mother, Eleanor is desperate to find where she belongs in the world. When she receives an invitation from the mysterious Doctor Montague to spend the summer at Hill House, she leaps at the chance to get away from her controlling sister Carrie, her brother-in-law, and her young niece—whom she greatly dislikes—and strike out on her own. Eleanor goes so far as to steal the car she and her sister share in order to make the hundred-mile drive to Hill House. Once at the manor, Eleanor recognizes the evil and danger within immediately—but she is so determined to establish her independence, make some friends, and exist on her own in the world that she stays on. As the disturbances within the house increase in frequency and intensity, the house seems to be communing with or calling for Eleanor—writing addressed to Eleanor appears on the walls of the house in chalk and in blood, and Eleanor feels herself fracturing and slipping, tempted by the desire to “surrender” to whatever haunts the house. Eleanor’s fraught and possibly romantic relationship with her roommate at Hill House, Theodora, is a source of anxiety and frustration for Eleanor, who longs for connection with another person but seems uncertain of how to make her desires known. Throughout the novel, Jackson sustains a sense of mystery surrounding Eleanor—she lies almost constantly about her age, her background, where she lives and how. What’s more, she seems not to know the truth of important details about her own life, insisting for example that a widely-reported poltergeist incident at her childhood home was simply the taunting of angry neighbors. The mysteries surrounding Eleanor only multiply and thicken as the novel goes on. As she ultimately falls entirely under the house’s spell, she attempts one night to commit suicide by jumping from its tallest turret after being lulled onward by a voice she believes to be the voice of her dead mother (whom, the narrative implies, she may actually have killed or allowed to die). At the novel’s conclusion, Eleanor commits suicide by driving her car into the oak tree in the house’s driveway, effectively choosing to die rather than allowing the other characters to send her away. Eleanor is one of contemporary literature’s most fascinating and mysterious protagonists and anti-heroes, and her arc encompasses all of the novel’s major themes: the war between the supernatural and the psychological, the search for home, the perils of isolation, and the dissociative properties of fear.

Eleanor Vance Quotes in The Haunting of Hill House

The The Haunting of Hill House quotes below are all either spoken by Eleanor Vance or refer to Eleanor Vance. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Supernatural vs. The Psychological  Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of The Haunting of Hill House published in 1959.
Chapter 1 Quotes

During the whole underside of her life, ever since her first memory, Eleanor had been waiting for something like Hill House. Caring for her mother, lifting a cross old lady from her chair to her bed, setting out endless little trays of soup and oatmeal, steeling herself to the filthy laundry, Eleanor had held fast to the belief that someday something would happen.

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 4
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3 Quotes

When they were silent for a moment the quiet weight of the house pressed down from all around them. Eleanor, wondering if she were really here at all, and not dreaming of Hill House from some safe spot impossibly remote, looked slowly and carefully around the room, telling herself that this was real, these things existed, from the tiles around the fireplace to the marble cupid; these people were going to be her friends.

Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 42-43
Explanation and Analysis:

The doctor sighed again. “Suppose,” he said slowly, “you heard the story of Hill House and decided not to stay. How would you leave, tonight?” He looked around at them again, quickly. “The gates are locked. Hill House has a reputation for insistent hospitality; it seemingly dislikes letting its guests get away. The last person who tried to leave Hill House in darkness—it was eighteen years ago, I grant you—was killed at the turn in the driveway, where his horse bolted and crushed him against the big tree. Suppose I tell you about Hill House, and one of you wants to leave? Tomorrow, at least, we could see that you got safely to the village.”

Related Characters: Doctor John Montague (speaker), Eleanor Vance, Theodora, Luke Sanderson
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 48
Explanation and Analysis:

“Certainly there are spots which inevitably attach to themselves an atmosphere of holiness and goodness; it might not then be too fanciful to say that some houses are born bad. Hill House, whatever the cause, has been unfit for human habitation for upwards of twenty years. What it was like before then, whether its personality was molded by the people who lived here, or the things they did, or whether it was evil from its start are all questions I cannot answer.”

Related Characters: Doctor John Montague (speaker), Eleanor Vance, Theodora, Luke Sanderson
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 50-51
Explanation and Analysis:

“It was accepted locally that she had chosen suicide because her guilty conscience drove her to it. I am more inclined to believe that she was one of those tenacious, unclever young women who can hold on desperately to what they believe is their own but cannot withstand, mentally, a constant nagging persecution; she had certainly no weapons to fight back against the younger sister’s campaign of hatred, her own friends in the village had been turned against her, and she seems to have been maddened by the conviction that locks and bolts could not keep out the enemy who stole into her house at night—”

“She should have gone away,” Eleanor said. “Left the house and run as far as she could go.”

“In effect, she did.”

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker), Doctor John Montague (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 58
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

“I hate having things done to me.”

“You’re about as crazy as anyone I ever saw,” Theodora said cheerfully.

“I don’t like to feel helpless,” Eleanor said. “My mother—”

“Your mother would have been delighted to see you with your toenails painted red,” Theodora said. “They look nice.”

Eleanor looked at her feet again. “It’s wicked,” she said inadequately. “I mean—on my feet. It makes me feel like I look like a fool.”

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker), Theodora (speaker)
Page Number: 86
Explanation and Analysis:

“I think we are all incredibly silly to stay. I think that an atmosphere like this one can find out the flaws and faults and weaknesses in all of us, and break us apart in a matter of days. We have only one defense, and that is running away. At least it can’t follow us, can it? When we feel ourselves endangered we can leave, just as we came. And,” he added dryly, “just as fast as we can go. […] Promise me absolutely that you will leave, as fast as you can, if you begin to feel the house catching at you.”

“I promise,” Eleanor said, smiling.

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker), Doctor John Montague (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 91
Explanation and Analysis:

“We must take precautions,” he said.

“Against what? How?”

“When Luke and I are called outside, and you two are kept imprisoned inside, doesn’t it begin to seem”—and his voice was very quiet—“doesn’t it begin to seem that the intention is, somehow, to separate us?”

Related Characters: Doctor John Montague (speaker), Theodora (speaker), Eleanor Vance, Luke Sanderson
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 99
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

Looking at herself in the mirror, with the bright morning sun light freshening even the blue room of Hill House, Eleanor thought, It is my second morning in Hill House, and I am unbelievably happy. Journeys end in lovers meeting; I have spent an all but sleepless night, I have told lies and made a fool of myself, and the very air tastes like wine. I have been frightened half out of my foolish wits, but I have somehow earned this joy; I have been waiting for it for so long.

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 100
Explanation and Analysis:

“When I am afraid, I can see perfectly the sensible, beautiful not-afraid side of the world, I can see chairs and tables and windows staying the same, not affected in the least, and I can see things like the careful woven texture of the carpet, not even moving. But when I am afraid I no longer exist in any relation to these things. I suppose because things are not afraid.”

“I think we are only afraid of ourselves,” the doctor said slowly.

“No,” Luke said. “Of seeing ourselves clearly and without disguise.”

“Of knowing what we really want,” Theodora said. She pressed her cheek against Eleanor’s hand and Eleanor, hating the touch of her, took her hand away quickly.

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker), Doctor John Montague (speaker), Theodora (speaker), Luke Sanderson (speaker)
Page Number: 117-118
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

“Eleanor Nellie Nell Nell. They sometimes do that,” Mrs. Montague broke off to explain. “They repeat a word over and over to make sure it comes across all right.”

Arthur cleared his throat. “What do you want?” he read.

[…]

“Want to be home.”

“What are you doing here?”

“Waiting.”

“Waiting for what?”

“Home.” Arthur stopped, and nodded profoundly. “There it is again,” he said. “Like a word, and use it over and over, just for the sound of it.”

Related Characters: Mrs. Montague (speaker), Arthur Parker (speaker), Eleanor Vance
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 142
Explanation and Analysis:

Somewhere there was a great, shaking crash… […] Eleanor heard the laughter over all, coming thin and lunatic, rising in its little crazy tune, and thought, No; it is over for me. It is too much, she thought, I will relinquish my possession of this self of mine, abdicate, give over willingly what I never wanted at all; whatever it wants of me it can have.

“I’ll come,” she said aloud, and was speaking up to Theodora, who leaned over her. The room was perfectly quiet, and between the still curtains at the window she could see the sunlight.

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker), Theodora
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 150
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

She heard the little melody fade, and felt the slight movement of air as the footsteps came close to her, and something almost brushed her face; perhaps there was a tiny sigh against her cheek, and she turned in surprise. Luke and the doctor bent over the chessboard, Arthur leaned confidingly close to Theodora, and Mrs. Montague talked.

None of them heard it, she thought with joy; nobody heard it but me.

Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 167
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

Dancing, the carpet soft under her feet, she came to the door behind which Theodora slept; faithless Theo, she thought, cruel, laughing Theo, wake up, wake up, wake up, and pounded and slapped the door, laughing, and shook the doorknob and then ran swiftly down the hall to Luke’s door and pounded; wake up, she thought, wake up and be faithless. None of them will open their doors, she thought; they will sit inside, with the blankets pressed around them, shivering and wondering what is going to happen to them next; wake up, she thought, pounding on the doctor’s door; I dare you to open your door and come out to see me dancing in the hall of Hill House.

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker), Doctor John Montague, Theodora, Luke Sanderson
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 169
Explanation and Analysis:

No stone lions for me, she thought, no oleanders; I have broken the spell of Hill House and somehow come inside. I am home, she thought, and stopped in wonder at the thought. I am home, I am home, she thought; now to climb.

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 171
Explanation and Analysis:

“I haven’t any apartment,” she said to Theodora. “I made it up. I sleep on a cot at my sister’s, in the baby’s room. I haven’t any home, no place at all.” […] She laughed, hearing her own words, so inadequate and so unutterably sad. […] “So you see there’s no place you can send me.”

I could, of course, go on and on, she wanted to tell them, seeing always their frightened, staring faces. I could go on and on, leaving my clothes for Theodora; I could go wandering and homeless, errant, and I would always come back here. It would be simpler to let me stay, more sensible, she wanted to tell them, happier.

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker), Theodora, Carrie
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:

“Go away, Eleanor, you can’t stay here; but I can,” she sang, “but I can; they don’t make the rules around here. They can’t turn me out […]; I won’t go, and Hill House belongs to me.”

With what she perceived as quick cleverness she pressed her foot down hard on the accelerator… [...] I am really doing it, she thought, turning the wheel to send the car directly at the great tree at the curve of the driveway, I am really doing it, I am doing this all by myself, now, at last; this is me, I am really really really doing it by myself.

In the unending, crashing second before the car hurled into the tree she thought clearly, Why am I doing this? Why am I doing this? Why don’t they stop me?

Related Characters: Eleanor Vance (speaker), Doctor John Montague, Theodora, Luke Sanderson
Related Symbols: Hill House
Page Number: 181-182
Explanation and Analysis:
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Eleanor Vance Character Timeline in The Haunting of Hill House

The timeline below shows where the character Eleanor Vance appears in The Haunting of Hill House. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
The Supernatural vs. The Psychological  Theme Icon
The Search for Home Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
Eleanor Vance, one of the participants in the Hill House experiment, is thirty-two years old. She... (full context)
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Eleanor receives Montague’s invitation with glee—all her life, she has been waiting for something exciting to... (full context)
The Search for Home Theme Icon
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Eleanor argues with her brother-in-law and Carrie about whether she can take the car she helped... (full context)
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The next morning, however, Eleanor takes a taxi into the city, to the parking garage where the car is kept—she... (full context)
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Eleanor takes the car out of the garage and begins driving out of the city, thrilled... (full context)
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Eleanor, who has never driven far alone before in her life, is excited and thrilled to... (full context)
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Eleanor stops for lunch after having driven just over a hundred miles. At a restaurant she... (full context)
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As she arrives in crooked, dirty, gloomy Hillsdale, Eleanor instantly regrets her decision to stop and rest in the town against Montague’s advice. Nevertheless,... (full context)
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Fear and Dissociation Theme Icon
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Eleanor gets back in her car and starts on the rocky, unpaved road up to Hill... (full context)
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The tall, heavy gate to the house is locked, chained, and barred. Eleanor presses the horn of her car, and soon a man appears on the other side... (full context)
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Before opening the gates, the caretaker states that he wants to make sure Eleanor knows what’s “waiting for [her] in there.” Eleanor feels a strange relief at being given... (full context)
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Eleanor drives up to Hill House along the winding, twisting road, occasionally catching a glimpse through... (full context)
Chapter 2
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Fear and Dissociation Theme Icon
Hill House is a “place of despair,” a house which seems almost “awake” to Eleanor. She feels the house is “without kindness” and was never meant to be inhabited by... (full context)
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As Eleanor puts her foot on the bottom step up to the front door, she finds that... (full context)
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Eleanor asks Mrs. Dudley to show her to her room, willing herself not to cry—she feels... (full context)
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As Eleanor sets her suitcase down, Mrs. Dudley robotically explains the schedule at Hill House. Mrs. Dudley... (full context)
The Search for Home Theme Icon
Fear and Dissociation Theme Icon
...the “awful” house and is off-put by the blue room’s “chillingly wrong” atmosphere and dimensions, Eleanor tries to shake off her fear and get in a cheery mood as she unpacks... (full context)
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Eleanor runs downstairs to greet the new arrival—a woman who introduces herself as Theodora. Despite having... (full context)
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After Mrs. Dudley leaves, Eleanor shows Theodora her room, and the two discuss how hungry they are. Despite how “terrible”... (full context)
The Supernatural vs. The Psychological  Theme Icon
Eleanor and Theodora step out onto the veranda and take in the expansive grounds of Hill... (full context)
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The Search for Home Theme Icon
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...short, though, when Theodora spots something moving in the grass and grows frightened. She clutches Eleanor’s hand, but after a moment declares that she must have just seen a rabbit. Eleanor... (full context)
Chapter 3
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Isolation Theme Icon
As Eleanor and Theodora arrive back at Hill House, it is nearly dark. The women spot a... (full context)
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The Search for Home Theme Icon
Doctor Montague, Eleanor, Theodora, and Luke retire to the dim, firelit study, where Luke fixes them all drinks.... (full context)
Fear and Dissociation Theme Icon
...self-consciously and jokingly telling farcical tales about their past—Luke describes himself as a “bullfighter” and Eleanor says she is an “artist’s model” who lives a “mad, abandoned life” as a transient.... (full context)
The Supernatural vs. The Psychological  Theme Icon
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...than any of the others—he promises to tell them his mission tomorrow, in daylight. Luke, Eleanor, and Theodora demand to know the story of Hill House, but Doctor Montague is reluctant... (full context)
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Montague says that he has summoned Eleanor and Theodora because of their psychic sensitivities—Theodora has telepathic abilities, and Eleanor has been “intimately... (full context)
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Isolation Theme Icon
Eleanor begins growing sleepy. The others discuss what games they could play. Montague says there’s a... (full context)
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As the men play chess, Eleanor and Theodora sit by the fire and talk about their lives. Eleanor remembers feeling lonely... (full context)
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Eleanor asks Theodora about her life, and Theodora tells Eleanor about the bohemian apartment she shares... (full context)
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The Search for Home Theme Icon
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...who isn’t ready to be alone in their rooms. As they all mount the stairs Eleanor realizes just how tired she is. The four of them all go off to their... (full context)
Chapter 4
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Eleanor wakes in the morning having slept, surprisingly, quite soundly. She hears the water running in... (full context)
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Eleanor washes herself and dresses, and then the two of them start downstairs. Theodora is worried... (full context)
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The group remarks on the unexpectedly quiet, uneventful evening they all had. Eleanor says it’s embarrassing to recall how afraid she was that something would happen in the... (full context)
The Supernatural vs. The Psychological  Theme Icon
The Search for Home Theme Icon
...game room is bleak and macabre, with a large deer head mounted on the wall. Eleanor feels awful for the poor little Crain girls who were forced to grow up here.... (full context)
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As the group continues exploring the house, Theodora points out the odd architecture—she and Eleanor should be able to see the tower from their bedroom windows, and yet they cannot.... (full context)
Fear and Dissociation Theme Icon
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...Old Miss Crain’s young companion are featured in the sculpture, as well. The statue makes Eleanor want to cover her eyes, but Theodora is drawn to it, and even reaches out... (full context)
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As Theodora and Eleanor look around the bright kitchen, they notice that there are over five doors out of... (full context)
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After lunch, Montague suggests that everyone take some time to rest in their rooms. Eleanor and Theodora, though, unaccustomed to naps, spend the afternoon lounging on Theodora’s bed. Theodora paints... (full context)
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...down the hall to the nursery, which is a cold spot—as she enters the room, Eleanor feels she is “passing through a wall of ice.” The doctor says the phenomenon cannot... (full context)
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...they have been working to make cozier. As Luke and Theodora converse lightly and jokingly, Eleanor cannot shake a sense of dread. Montague notices she is nervous and admits that he... (full context)
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In the middle of the night, Eleanor hears something calling her name. She stumbles out of bed, disoriented, and says she’s “Coming,... (full context)
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Eleanor tells herself to remain calm, even as she feels chills spreading up and down her... (full context)
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Theodora and Eleanor hold each other on the bed as the cold dissipates. The episode is over, and... (full context)
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...be heard by him or Luke—they only came back inside when they heard Theodora and Eleanor shout. The doctor wonders if Hill House’s “intention” is to separate the four of them... (full context)
Chapter 5
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As Eleanor wakes in the morning, she thinks to herself how “unbelievably happy” she is. After a... (full context)
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Theodora and Eleanor race laughing down the stairs to the dining room, where they greet everyone happily. Luke,... (full context)
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...and scraggly, taking up nearly the entire wall. The words read: “HELP ELEANOR COME HOME.” Eleanor is chilled and frightened, and begs the others to wipe the writing off the walls.... (full context)
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Eleanor wonders why the house has chosen to taunt her. Theodora suggests that Eleanor wrote the... (full context)
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...third morning in Hill House, Montague and Luke try to measure the cold spot while Eleanor and Theodora take notes for them. After the miserable work is done, the doctor, over... (full context)
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After lunch, Theodora and Eleanor head upstairs, planning to take naps. Shortly after entering her room, though, Eleanor hears Theodora... (full context)
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...up the wardrobe to find that all her clothes are torn and stained with blood. Eleanor calls calmly for Montague and Luke, who come upstairs to find Theodora sobbing and kicking... (full context)
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Eleanor urges Montague and Luke to take Theodora into Eleanor’s own room to get her away... (full context)
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Eleanor returns to her room where she helps Theodora clean blood off her face and hands.... (full context)
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Later, in the parlor, Eleanor finds herself disturbed by cruel and even violent thoughts about Theodora. She is angry with... (full context)
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That night, another bed is moved into Eleanor’s room for Theodora. The two of them sit up in their pushed-together beds, holding hands—they... (full context)
Chapter 6
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The next day, Eleanor, exhausted and pale, sits beside Luke outside on the steps of Hill House’s smaller, adjoining... (full context)
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While Montague and Luke play chess, Theodora teases Eleanor about whether she’ll invite Luke over to her apartment after they’re all done at Hill... (full context)
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...a widening of the path, they are simultaneously gripped by cold and fear. Theodora clutches Eleanor’s hand as the landscape seems to glow around them, threatening to consume them. They walk... (full context)
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Eleanor and Theodora run, holding hands all the way, and finally find themselves back at the... (full context)
Chapter 7
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It is Saturday—the day Mrs. Montague is expected to arrive. Eleanor goes alone into the hills, wanting to be alone and away from the darkness of... (full context)
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...friend, Arthur Parker. Doctor Montague rushes to greet her, and excitedly introduces her to Theodora, Eleanor, and Luke. It is after dark, and Mrs. Montague chastises the group for not waiting... (full context)
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...garage, Luke warns her about their policy of not going outside at night, established after Eleanor and Theodora’s terrifying encounter. Mrs. Montague dismisses Luke as a coward, and so does Arthur;... (full context)
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Luke, Theodora, Eleanor, and Doctor Montague gather in the parlor, and the doctor begins explaining how planchette works.... (full context)
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...writing session and reads them aloud. Apparently, the spirit guiding planchette introduced itself as “Nell Eleanor Nellie Nell Nell,” and said it wanted “home.” When Mrs. Montague asked the spirit why,... (full context)
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Everyone bids one another goodnight and retreats to their separate rooms, but Theodora tells Eleanor to wait a minute and to not get undressed—Luke whispered to her earlier that the... (full context)
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...house for having “exhausted [its] repertoire,” and repeating the “pounding act” from several nights ago. Eleanor is the only one who is profoundly affected by the happening—she rocks back and forth... (full context)
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As the noise recedes, Luke offers everyone some brandy. They all accept, and Eleanor sips nervously, believing they are only in the “eye of the storm.” Sure enough, the... (full context)
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When Eleanor regains her senses, the room is quiet, and sunlight is coming in through the window.... (full context)
Chapter 8
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...morning, the group worries that Mrs. Montague and Arthur, still sleeping soundly, will miss breakfast. Eleanor, though, assures them that their guests are coming—she says she can hear them on the... (full context)
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Later, Theodora and Eleanor are working on their diaries when Eleanor confesses that she’s not sure of what to... (full context)
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Eleanor continues pestering Theodora, who suggests they go for a walk to get out of the... (full context)
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As the path narrows, Eleanor takes the lead. As she walks, she believes Theodora and Luke are talking nastily about... (full context)
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After lunch, Luke and Theodora spend some time outside together laughing in the grass. Eleanor follows them but stays hidden—she is determined to find out if they really hate her.... (full context)
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Inside, Eleanor listens at the library door as Arthur pesters Montague with inane observations about the house... (full context)
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Later that evening, Luke compliments Theodora on how fine she looks in Eleanor’s clothes. Eleanor sits quietly alone, listening to “the sounds of the house.” She can hear... (full context)
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...that they would never interfere with her work, but Mrs. Montague will not be comforted. Eleanor becomes aware of a presence in the center of the room—a child’s voice—singing a little... (full context)
Chapter 9
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In the middle of the night, Eleanor rises from bed and leaves her and Theodora’s room quietly. She tiptoes through the halls... (full context)
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A voice upstairs urges Eleanor to “come along.” Believing the voice to be her mother, Eleanor scampers back upstairs and... (full context)
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Eleanor hears Theodora calling for her, and then shouting to Luke and Doctor Montague that she’s... (full context)
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Eleanor at last runs into the library, where the air is warmer still. She feels she... (full context)
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Doctor Montague urges Eleanor to come down the staircase carefully—it has rotted away from the wall, and is in... (full context)
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The next morning is “humiliating [and] disastrous.” No one says anything to Eleanor at breakfast, though they all pass her food politely. Eleanor notices that Theodora is wearing... (full context)
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...“perfectly fine.” Theodora corroborates Mrs. Montague’s report. Doctor Montague speaks over his wife, apologizing to Eleanor for having to send her away. Eleanor insists she can’t leave, but Theodora urges Eleanor... (full context)
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Mrs. Montague suggests someone should drive Eleanor home to the city, but Doctor Montague says that to “prolong the association” with Hill... (full context)
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Later, everyone sees Eleanor out of the house, and as she looks up at the tower above them all,... (full context)
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Montague helps Eleanor into her car, even as she clutches at his arms and begs him to let... (full context)
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Eleanor waves goodbye to everyone and starts the car. She starts off down the drive, even... (full context)
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After Eleanor’s suicide, Doctor Montague and his party vacate Hill House. Theodora returns home to her apartment... (full context)