The Inheritance of Loss

The Inheritance of Loss

The Inheritance of Loss Chapter 42 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Gyan’s sister informs their family of Gyan’s activities, despite the fact that he bribed her. His parents and grandmother warn him to stay away from Sai, as they could be at the mercy of her family. His grandmother also forbids Gyan from going with his friends to the march the next day. She tells his friends that he is sick.
Even though Sai is a young girl and Sai herself had expected to be laughed at, the family is cautious about insulting her because of her family’s wealth and power. This shows how the respect demanded of people can be passed down from generation to generation, as Sai acquired this respect from her grandfather.
Themes
Poverty vs. Privilege Theme Icon
Gender and Misogyny Theme Icon
Power and Humiliation Theme Icon
Gyan is secretly relieved by this reprieve of responsibility. He had tried to be part of politics and history, but realizes that happiness is more readily available when one is unconcerned by those things. He starts to become guilty about the gun robbery, wondering if he can ever be happy after that betrayal.
Again, Gyan confirms how masculinity, adulthood, and political activity have become inextricably entwined. With the reprieve from having to attend the rally, he is also relieved of the brunt of an adult responsibility, and starts to feel sorry for Sai again.
Themes
Gender and Misogyny Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Sai lies in her room, and she and Gyan both miss the defining protest of the conflict: the burning of the Indo-Nepal Treaty. Boys arrive at Cho Oyu from the GNLF, demanding that someone attend. The judge tells the cook to go.
The novel again demonstrates the repeated misfortune of the lower-class. Because he is wealthy, the judge is able to send the cook in his place, into what becomes a very dangerous protest where the cook could very well have lost his life.
Themes
Poverty vs. Privilege Theme Icon