The Invisible Man

by

H. G. Wells

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The Invisible Man: Chapter 24 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Doctor Kemp asks Griffin what he plans to do now, and why he came to Port Burdock in the first place. Griffin replies that he thought he would have to flee the country, and planned to go to Spain or Algiers. He planned to use Marvel as “a moneybox and luggage carrier.” However, his plan was ruined when Marvel betrayed him, and now Griffin needs to find a way to get his books back. Kemp tells Griffin that Marvel asked to be locked up at the police station, where he is now. Griffin regrets having acted alone up until this point, saying that there is not much one can do alone. He says he now wants a “goalkeeper” and “helper.”
Griffin expresses his desire for a “helper” as an acknowledgment of not wanting to be alone, perhaps in order to seem more sympathetic and likable to Kemp. However, the fact that he called Marvel a “moneybox” suggests that he sees other people more as objects or tools to be used than friends or even allies.
Themes
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Griffin reflects that invisibility is useful in approaching people and getting away, and therefore is particularly helpful for “killing.” However, if he is caught, Griffin’s invisibility will not help him escape. Griffin emphasizes: “It is killing we must do, Kemp,” which makes Kemp uneasy. Griffin continues that they must establish a “Reign of Terror” in order to gain control over a town like Port Burdock.
In this passage, it becomes clear that Griffin is in fact truly evil. The fact that he feels comfortable revealing his diabolical plans to Kemp suggests that he has deluded himself into believing that Kemp will go along with him, simply because he too is a scientist.
Themes
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Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
Related Quotes
Kemp is distracted by the sound of his front door opening. He realizes that there are people downstairs, and quickly tells Griffin that he doesn’t agree with his plan of “playing a game against the race.” He advises Griffin to publish his findings and gain support from others, rather than isolating himself. Griffin hears footsteps coming upstairs, and quickly takes off the robe he was wearing, shouting: “Traitor!” Kemp attempts to lock Griffin in his bedroom, but fumbles with the key. Kemp feels himself be aggressively hit by thin air, knocking him down the stairs. He lies on the ground, and declares that Griffin has left, shouting: “the game’s up!”
It does not take long for Griffin to see the error in judgment he made in assuming that Kemp would support the idea of a “Reign of Terror.” Kemp’s response to this plan proves that he is both more reasonable more moral than Griffin. Griffin’s assumption that because Kemp is another highly educated, urban, upper-middle class scientist he would side with him reveals a profound misunderstanding of other people.
Themes
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon