The Invisible Man

by

H. G. Wells

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The Invisible Man: Chapter 25 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Doctor Kemp, having recovered from his blow, stands talking to Colonel Adye. He accuses Griffin of being insane, saying that he is “pure selfishness” who only thinks about himself. He tells the colonel about Griffin’s plans for a “Reign of Terror,” and says that Adye must do everything he can to stop him. Kemp reemphasizes how dangerous Griffin is, and Adye agrees on the urgency of the situation, telling Kemp to come with him.
Doctor Kemp and Colonel Adye are both highly educated, reasonably powerful men, and are thus a more formidable match to Griffin than the people of Iping. Perhaps more importantly, they both believe that Griffin is both invisible and evil, and thus won’t waste time being skeptical of his true nature.
Themes
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Kemp advises Adye that when Griffin eats, his food is visible. Tentatively, Kemp suggests that they put powdered glass on the roads. He knows it’s cruel, but it is perhaps necessary. Adye agrees that it’s “unsportsmanlike” but that he will do it. Kemp concludes that Griffin has become “unhuman” and that he has brought whatever suffering will befall him on himself.
Kemp and Adye are the opposite to Griffin in the sense that they strongly believe in sticking to codes of morality and decency. However, considering that Griffin has violated his own humanity, they decide that these rules do not apply in his case.
Themes
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon