The Invisible Man

by

H. G. Wells

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Mrs. Hall is a woman who lives in Iping and who runs the Coach and Horses Inn with her husband, Mr. Hall. She is a polite, decent woman who fatefully overlooks Griffin’s strange behavior when he promises to pay her more money for his stay. Depending on one’s perspective, this arguably makes her greedy or simply a good business owner. She prides herself on being non-superstitious, and dismisses warning signs about Griffin’s invisibility, only believing that he is actually invisible after he reveals it to her himself.

Mrs. Hall Quotes in The Invisible Man

The The Invisible Man quotes below are all either spoken by Mrs. Hall or refer to Mrs. Hall. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Borzoi edition of The Invisible Man published in 2010.
Chapter 2 Quotes

She was all the more inclined to snap at Hall because the stranger was undoubtedly an unusually strange sort of stranger, and she was by no means assured about him in her own mind. In the middle of the night she woke up dreaming of huge white heads like turnips, that came trailing after her at the end of interminable necks, and with vast black eyes. But being a sensible woman, she subdued her terrors and turned over and went to sleep again.

Page Number: 103
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

There were a number of skirmishes with Mrs. Hall on matters of domestic discipline, but in every case until late in April, when the first signs of penury began, he overrode her by the easy expedient of an extra payment. Hall did not like him, and whenever he dared he talked of the advisability of getting rid of him; but he showed his dislike chiefly by concealing it ostentatiously, and avoiding his visitor as much as possible. “Wait till the summer,” said Mrs. Hall, sagely, “when the artisks are beginning to come. Then we'll see. He may be a bit overbearing, but bills settled punctual is bills settled punctual, whatever you like to say.”

Related Characters: Mrs. Hall (speaker), Griffin/The Invisible Man , Mr. Hall
Page Number: 109
Explanation and Analysis:

The stranger did not go to church, and indeed made no difference between Sunday and the irreligious days, even in costume. He worked, as Mrs. Hall thought, very fitfully. Some days he would come down ready and be continuously busy. On others he would rise late, pace his room, fretting audibly for hours together, smoke, sleep in the armchair by the fire. Communication with the world beyond the village he had none.

Related Characters: Griffin/The Invisible Man , Mrs. Hall
Page Number: 109
Explanation and Analysis:

It was inevitable that a person of so remarkable an appearance and bearing should form a frequent topic in such a village as Iping. Opinion was greatly divided about his occupation. Mrs. Hall was sensitive on the point. When questioned, she explained very carefully that he was an “experimental investigator,” going gingerly over the syllables as one who dreads pitfalls. When asked what an experimental investigator was, she would say with a touch of superiority that most educated people knew that, and would then explain that he “discovered things”. Her visitor had had an accident, she said, which temporarily discoloured his face and hands; and being of a sensitive disposition, he was averse to any public notice of the fact.

Related Characters: Griffin/The Invisible Man , Mrs. Hall
Page Number: 110
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

“You don't understand,” he said, “who I am or what I am. I'll show you. By Heaven! I'll show you.” Then he put his open palm over his face and withdrew it. The centre of his face became a black cavity. “Here,” he said. He stepped forward and handed Mrs. Hall something which she, staring at his metamorphosed face, accepted automatically. Then, when she saw what it was, she screamed loudly, dropped it, and staggered back. The nose—it was the stranger's nose! pink and shining—rolled on the floor.

Related Characters: Griffin/The Invisible Man (speaker), Mrs. Hall
Page Number: 124
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Invisible Man LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Invisible Man PDF

Mrs. Hall Character Timeline in The Invisible Man

The timeline below shows where the character Mrs. Hall appears in The Invisible Man. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: The Strange Man’s Arrival
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Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
...arrives at the Coach and Horses Inn and begs for a room and a fire. Mrs. Hall takes him to a room and lights a fire. She is thrilled that he is... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Mrs. Hall asks to take Griffin’s hat and coat, but he refuses. She is surprised to see... (full context)
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Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
Griffin rudely tells Mrs. Hall to leave his hat, and she is shocked to see him holding a napkin over... (full context)
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Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Making conversation, Mrs. Hall tells Griffin about a time when her brother injured himself with a scythe, and Griffin... (full context)
Chapter 2: Mr. Teddy Henfrey’s First Impressions
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Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
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At 4 pm, just as Mrs. Hall is getting ready to ask Griffin if he’d like some tea, Teddy Henfrey, the clock... (full context)
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Griffin inquires again about his boxes, and Mrs. Hall assures him they will come the next day. Griffin explains that he is an “experimental... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Mrs. Hall begins to ask Griffin a question, but he dismisses her. Mrs. Hall leaves, but Henfrey... (full context)
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Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
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When Mr. Hall returns to the inn, Mrs. Hall berates him for spending too long in Sidderbridge. Mr. Hall is suspicious of Griffin and... (full context)
Chapter 3: The Thousand and One Bottles
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...towards him.” Then the door slams in his face. He goes back downstairs, where Fearenside, Mrs. Hall , and a small group of others are discussing the dog bite. Hall explains that... (full context)
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...parlor room, leaving empty crates full of straw in the middle of the room. Later, Mrs. Hall takes Griffin’s dinner to him. He is so absorbed in his work that he doesn’t... (full context)
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Griffin works all afternoon, mostly in silence. However, at one point Mrs. Hall hears bottles smashing and listens at the door to check that everything is alright. She... (full context)
Chapter 4: Mr. Cuss Interviews the Stranger
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
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...on his stay at the Coach and Horses is seemingly ordinary. He occasionally fights with Mrs. Hall about “matters of domestic discipline,” but each time he settles the matter by promising to... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
...quickly becomes the subject of gossip in Iping. There is much discussion of his job; Mrs. Hall loves to explain that he is an “experimental investigator,” adding that this means he is... (full context)
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...and eventually goes to the Coach and Horses, where he is surprised to learn that Mrs. Hall does not know the stranger’s name (he’s not yet referred to as Griffin). When Cuss... (full context)
Chapter 6: The Furniture That Went Mad
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Early on the same Whit Monday morning, Mr. Hall and Mrs. Hall walk down to the cellar to do something related to “the specific gravity of their... (full context)
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Moments later, Mrs. Hall hears the front door close and then a sneeze on the staircase. She goes into... (full context)
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Mrs. Hall runs out into Mr. Hall’s arms in the hallway, faint with fright. She declares that... (full context)
Chapter 7: The Unveiling of the Stranger
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At midday Griffin suddenly opens the door and demands to speak with Mrs. Hall . She appears out of breath, and Griffin asks why his breakfast wasn’t served. In... (full context)
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Griffin declares that Mrs. Hall doesn’t know who he is, and promises to show her. He takes off the bandages... (full context)
Chapter 12: The Invisible Man Loses His Temper
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...Henfrey and Hall declare that this is “odd” and continue to eavesdrop on the room. Mrs. Hall appears and, seeing the two men spying, tells them to stop. Disappointed, they tiptoe away. (full context)
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Henfrey says he heard the window in the parlor room, and he, Mr. Hall, and Mrs. Hall stand listening closely. It is at this moment that Huxter comes running, shouting “Stop thief!”... (full context)