The Invisible Man

by

H. G. Wells

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Invisible Man can help.

Thomas Marvel Character Analysis

Thomas Marvel is a “tramp” (homeless person) who lives in the Sussex countryside. Griffin strikes up an alliance with him, flattering him by telling him that he has chosen him specially to help him. Marvel is astonished by Griffin’s invisibility and agrees to help him too hastily, without pausing to think about the consequences. Later Marvel steals Griffin’s notebooks and money from him, and Griffin almost kills him in response. However, Marvel is able to escape with both the money and notebooks, and after Griffin’s death becomes a landlord with a reputation for wisdom in the local area. He keeps his possession of the books secret, treasuring them even though he does not understand their contents.

Thomas Marvel Quotes in The Invisible Man

The The Invisible Man quotes below are all either spoken by Thomas Marvel or refer to Thomas Marvel. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Borzoi edition of The Invisible Man published in 2010.
Chapter 9 Quotes

“I've chosen you,” said the Voice. “You are the only man except some of those fools down there, who knows there is such a thing as an invisible man. You have to be my helper. Help me—and I will do great things for you. An invisible man is a man of power.”

He stopped for a moment to sneeze violently.

“But if you betray me,” he said, “if you fail to do as I direct you—”

He paused and tapped Mr. Marvel's shoulder smartly. Mr. Marvel gave a yelp of terror at the touch. “I don’t want to betray you,” said Mr. Marvel, edging away from the direction of the fingers.

“Don’t you go a-thinking that, whatever you do. All I want to do is to help you—just tell me what I got to do. (Lord!) Whatever you want done, that I'm most willing to do.”

Related Characters: Griffin/The Invisible Man (speaker), Thomas Marvel (speaker)
Page Number: 135-136
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 14 Quotes

And just think of the things he might do! Where'd you be, if he took a drop over and above, and had a fancy to go for you? Suppose he wants to rob—who can prevent him? He can trespass, he can burgle, he could walk through a cordon of policemen as easy as me or you could give the slip to a blind man! Easier! For these here blind chaps hear uncommon sharp, I'm told.

Related Characters: The Mariner (speaker), Griffin/The Invisible Man , Thomas Marvel
Page Number: 154
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Invisible Man LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Invisible Man PDF

Thomas Marvel Character Timeline in The Invisible Man

The timeline below shows where the character Thomas Marvel appears in The Invisible Man. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 9: Mr. Thomas Marvel
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Mr. Thomas Marvel has a large face, enormous nose, expressive mouth, and wild-looking beard. He is short and... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
Suddenly, Marvel is confused. He asks: “Where are yer?” and wonders aloud if he is drunk or... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
Griffin explains that he is “an invisible man.” At first Marvel doesn’t believe him, but Griffin continues to explain that he is a normal man who... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
Marvel finds Griffin’s presence entrancing, but Griffin explains that invisibility “isn’t half so wonderful as you... (full context)
Chapter 10: Mr. Marvel’s Visit to Iping
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
At 4 pm a stranger arrives in Iping—Thomas Marvel. He heads straight for the Coach and Horses, looking agitated. Inside, he tries to open... (full context)
Chapter 11: In the Coach and Horses
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
The narrator goes back to explain what led up Marvel’s flight from the inn. Huxter first saw Marvel at a moment when Cuss and Bunting... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
...and is embarrassed to admit this. At that moment, the door suddenly opened to reveal Marvel, who on seeing the other men pretended that he was lost. Marvel closes the door... (full context)
Chapter 13: Mr. Marvel Discusses his Resignation
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
By evening, people begin to tentatively return to the streets of Iping. Thomas Marvel walks “painfully” along the path to Bramblehurst. He is still carrying  the three books and... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Marvel tries to protest, saying that he is not the right person for this job. Griffin... (full context)
Chapter 14: At Port Stowe
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
At 10 am the next day, Marvel sits, dirty and panting, on a bench outside an inn in Port Stowe. He is... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
The mariner shows Marvel the article, which recounts the events of Whit Monday. Marvel asks if the Invisible Man... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
In a whisper, Marvel boasts that he knows about the Invisible Man through “private sources.” Marvel begins to reveal... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Marvel and the mariner part ways. Later, the mariner hears from a friend that a “fistful... (full context)
Chapter 16: In the Jolly Cricketers
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
...commotion coming from outside. The barman suggests that it might be a fire, when suddenly Marvel bursts inside. He attempts to shut the door behind him, but it remains open. Marvel... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
There is knocking and loud shouting at the door, and the policeman asks who’s there. Marvel pleads that they do not open the door, and the barman offers Marvel a place... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Suddenly, the door to the pub bursts open. Marvel starts squealing, and the men run behind the bar to help him. Marvel is forced... (full context)
Chapter 17: Doctor Kemp’s Visitor
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
Griffin explains that Marvel tried to steal his money. When Kemp tries to ask him more questions, Griffin protests... (full context)
Chapter 24: The Plan That Failed
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
...flee the country, and planned to go to Spain or Algiers. He planned to use Marvel as “a moneybox and luggage carrier.” However, his plan was ruined when Marvel betrayed him,... (full context)
The Epilogue
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
...that this is the end of the “strange and evil experiment of the Invisible Man.” Marvel, who is now a landlord in Port Stowe, sometimes shares the tale of his involvement... (full context)
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
Sometimes when he is alone, Marvel takes out the notebooks he stole from Griffin, which he keeps locked away. He observes... (full context)