The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

by

Katherine Anne Porter

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The story reveals little about George, other than that he is the man who jilted Granny Weatherall at the altar many decades earlier. Despite this, he plays an extremely important role in the story, given the effect that this has on the protagonist. Granny sees him as a negative force, conflated in her memory with a dark cloud that seems like hell itself.

George Quotes in The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The The Jilting of Granny Weatherall quotes below are all either spoken by George or refer to George. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Order and Control Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Harcourt edition of The Jilting of Granny Weatherall published in 1979.
The Jilting of Granny Weatherall Quotes

I want you to pick all the fruit this year and see that nothing is wasted. There’s always someone who can use it. Don’t let good things rot for want of using. You waste life when you waste good food. Don’t let things get lost. It’s bitter to lose things.

Related Characters: Granny / Ellen Weatherall, George
Related Symbols: The Wedding Cake
Page Number: 84
Explanation and Analysis:

There was the day, the day, but a whirl of dark smoke rose and covered it, crept up and over into the bright field where everything was planted so carefully in orderly rows. That was hell, she knew hell when she saw it.

Related Characters: Granny / Ellen Weatherall (speaker), George
Page Number: 84
Explanation and Analysis:

I want you to find George. Find him and be sure to tell him I forgot him. I want him to know I had my husband just the same and my children and my house like any other woman. A good house too and a good husband that I loved and fine children out of him. Better than I hoped for even. […] no, there was something else besides the house and the man and the children. Oh, surely they were not all? What was it? Something not given back.

Related Characters: Granny / Ellen Weatherall (speaker), George
Page Number: 86
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Jilting of Granny Weatherall LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Jilting of Granny Weatherall PDF

George Character Timeline in The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The timeline below shows where the character George appears in The Jilting of Granny Weatherall. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
The Jilting of Granny Weatherall
Order and Control Theme Icon
Female Strength Theme Icon
...she must sort out: a box of love letters in the attic from two men, George and John. She decides that she must sort the box out tomorrow, so that her... (full context)
Order and Control Theme Icon
Religion vs. Humanity Theme Icon
...in orderly rows.” This, she decides, “was hell,” and she realizes that the thought of George himself is mixed up with this idea: “The thought of him was a smoky cloud... (full context)
Death and Old Age vs. Life and Youth Theme Icon
Female Strength Theme Icon
...replies that she has “changed her mind after sixty years” and would like to see George after all, to show him everything that she has achieved without him: a “good house,”... (full context)
Religion vs. Humanity Theme Icon
...He was also the priest who was supposed to marry Granny and her former fiancé George. Granny remembers Father Connolly as a man fond of gossip and cursing, rather than as... (full context)
Order and Control Theme Icon
Death and Old Age vs. Life and Youth Theme Icon
Female Strength Theme Icon
Religion vs. Humanity Theme Icon
...give Granny a “sign,” and instead abandons her in her time of need, just as George did sixty years before—“again” there was “no bridegroom and the priest in the house,” because... (full context)