The Killer Angels

The Killer Angels

by

Michael Shaara

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Kemper is a Confederate Brigadier General. He served with Longstreet, Pickett, Armistead, and Garnett in the Mexican War and leads a brigade under Pickett at Gettysburg. He is known to be stoic, with a political background, having served as speaker of the Virginia House of Representatives. He is suspicious of foreigners and, upon meeting Fremantle, immediately questions him about rumors of English intervention on behalf of the Confederacy. He is a stolid believer in “the Cause,” arguing to whomever will listen that the war is being fought for freedom from the rule of a foreign government, and not because of slavery. During Pickett’s Charge, he rides his own horse in solidarity with Garnett. He is mortally wounded during the battle.

Jim Kemper Quotes in The Killer Angels

The The Killer Angels quotes below are all either spoken by Jim Kemper or refer to Jim Kemper. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Honor Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Ballantine edition of The Killer Angels published in 1974.
Monday, June 29, 1863: Chapter 4 Quotes

Pickett answered obligingly, unconcerned, “Well, Jim Kemper kept needling our English friend about why they didn’t come and join in with us, it being in their interest and all, and the Englishman said that it was a very touchy subject, since most Englishmen figured the war was all about, ah, slavery, and then old Kemper got a bit outraged and had to explain to him how wrong he was, and Sorrel and some others joined in, but no harm done.”

“Damn fool,” Kemper said. “He still thinks it’s about slavery.”

Related Characters: George Pickett (speaker), Jim Kemper (speaker), Arthur Lyon Fremantle, G. Moxley Sorrel
Page Number: 62
Explanation and Analysis:
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Jim Kemper Character Timeline in The Killer Angels

The timeline below shows where the character Jim Kemper appears in The Killer Angels. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Monday, June 29, 1863: Chapter 4: Longstreet
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
...doubts this will happen. Suddenly George Pickett arrives with his brigade commanders, Armistead, Garnett, and Kemper. Longstreet has known these men since they all served together in the Mexican War and... (full context)
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
...“Lothario,” though he is actually a shy widower. Garnett is known for being sickly, and Kemper for being a politician (a former member of the Virginia legislature) and suspicious of foreigners.... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Slavery and Freedom Theme Icon
...dangerous in Lee.” As their conversation comes to an end, the two find Sorrel and Kemper regaling Fremantle with arguments about “the Cause.” Kemper explains, “You must tell [England] … what... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Slavery and Freedom Theme Icon
...the Confederacy to be a touchy subject, due to the issue of slavery. This enrages Kemper and the other men, who try to explain that the war is not, in fact,... (full context)
Friday, July 3, 1863: Chapter 4: Armistead
Honor Theme Icon
...They start making their way up the rise, the line beginning to break. He sees Kemper riding, because Garnett rode. Kemper rides over to Armistead, pleading for help, but they can... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
...there is more and more confusion, the lines fragmenting as more and more men fall. Kemper is down. Armistead expects to die at any moment but is not hit. As they... (full context)
Friday, July 3, 1863: Chapter 5: Longstreet
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
...fire drinking coffee. Sorrel brings the figures from the day: Armistead and Garnett are dead; Kemper is dying. Seven of Pickett’s thirteen colonels are dead and six are wounded. Longstreet can... (full context)