The Killer Angels

The Killer Angels

by

Michael Shaara

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A Union major general, Hancock is also Armistead’s close friend, having served with him, Longstreet, and others in the Mexican War. He is a commanding presence and “picture-book soldier.” Stalwart in battle, he opposes Meade’s desire to withdraw and heroically leads the Union in hanging onto Cemetery Hill during the final Confederate offensive. Though badly injured in battle, he survives, unlike Armistead, with whom he is never reunited.
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Winfield Scott Hancock Character Timeline in The Killer Angels

The timeline below shows where the character Winfield Scott Hancock appears in The Killer Angels. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Monday, June 29, 1863: Chapter 4: Longstreet
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...the poker game. As Armistead talks with Longstreet, he mentions his good friend, Winfield Scott Hancock. Hancock, a Union general, is currently marching toward Gettysburg. (full context)
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Armistead, however, isn’t interested in talking tactics and returns to the subject of Hancock. Longstreet encourages him to see his friend should the opportunity arise—he can simply get a... (full context)
Wednesday, July 1, 1863: Chapter 7: Buford
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...the loss of half his men through inadequate support. Buford is dizzied with anger. Eventually Hancock listens to him, and he is pacified. (full context)
Thursday, July 2, 1863: Chapter 5: Longstreet
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...a sentimental Irish song. It especially touches Armistead, who remembers playing the same song with Hancock the spring before the men went their separate ways for the war. Armistead remembers telling... (full context)
Friday, July 3, 1863: Chapter 2: Longstreet
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...wall. The only hope is that Confederate artillery will break up Union defenses; and with Hancock on the hill, he knows the Yankees will not retreat. He figures they will suffer... (full context)
Friday, July 3, 1863: Chapter 3: Chamberlain
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...army to withdraw that morning, but had been voted down by all the corps commanders, Hancock standing especially firm. Pitzer places Chamberlain’s regiment in reserve behind the crest of Cemetery Hill. (full context)
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...him up the crest of the hill, and Chamberlain finds himself in the presence of Hancock, a “picture-book soldier.” He perks up and straightens his uniform before passing him. Hancock is... (full context)
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...reply, the thunderous noise lulls Chamberlain to sleep. He wakes up once, amazed to see Hancock riding calmly along the crest of the ridge. He listens to the “great orchestra of... (full context)
Friday, July 3, 1863: Chapter 4: Armistead
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...the solidity of Longstreet’s unmoving presence in the distance; it reminds him of his friend Hancock, but he cannot think about that now. As the attack looms, though, he can’t help... (full context)
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...Then the orders come. They begin to move through the woods. Armistead silently apologizes to Hancock and commits his own spirit to God. A rabbit breaks from the brush and runs... (full context)
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...again. Armistead realizes they hadn’t actually driven off any Yankee guns; the apparent withdrawal was Hancock’s doing, to lure them in. (full context)
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...didn’t have a chance. He feels ready for death but manages to ask for General Hancock. The officer tells him Hancock has been hit. Armistead manages to send his regrets, asking... (full context)