The Lais of Marie de France

by

Marie de France

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The queen is King Arthur’s wife. When Lanval resists her romantic advances by claiming that even his secret lover’s serving girls are prettier than her, the queen is furious. She accuses Lanval of preferring the company of young men (implying that he’s gay). Later, she tells King Arthur that Lanval approached her and, when rebuffed, insulted her.
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Arthur’s Queen Character Timeline in The Lais of Marie de France

The timeline below shows where the character Arthur’s Queen appears in The Lais of Marie de France. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
V. Lanval
Love and Suffering Theme Icon
Virtue, Vice, and Justice Theme Icon
Gender Roles and Class Status Theme Icon
...that year, a large group of knights, including Gawain and Ywain, is relaxing in the queen’s garden. Gawain notices that Lanval is missing and insists that he be brought to join... (full context)
Love and Suffering Theme Icon
Virtue, Vice, and Justice Theme Icon
Gender Roles and Class Status Theme Icon
In response to the queen’s accusation, Lanval quickly says something he comes to regret: that he enjoys the love of... (full context)
Love and Suffering Theme Icon
Virtue, Vice, and Justice Theme Icon
...despondent that he wishes for death. Still, he denies the accusation that he sought the queen’s love, though he admits that his boast about his lady’s beauty is true. King Arthur... (full context)
Love and Suffering Theme Icon
Magic and Storytelling Theme Icon
...hastily sends them to join the other women; this is taking too long, and the queen is growing impatient. (full context)
Love and Suffering Theme Icon
Virtue, Vice, and Justice Theme Icon
Gender Roles and Class Status Theme Icon
Magic and Storytelling Theme Icon
...has come, and he is saved. The fairy lady explains to King Arthur that the queen was wrong and that Lanval had never sought her love. Then the barons all agree... (full context)