The Lieutenant

by

Kate Grenville

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Lieutenant Daniel Rooke Character Analysis

Rooke is born in Portsmouth in 1962. His father is a clerk, and Rooke is a very intelligent child. His interest in prime numbers attracts the attention of Dr. Adair, who sends Rooke to the Naval Academy. Though the Academy is academically rigorous, the other boys bully Rooke and he feels as though he's little more than a shell of a person. Rooke finds that he has a knack for languages and learns four by the time he's fifteen. He also loves astronomy, and visits Dr. Vickery, the Astronomer Royale, when he's a teenager. After he finishes school, Rooke joins the marines and is briefly involved in the American Revolutionary War. He sees military service as a way to continue his mathematical and scientific pursuits, although he soon learns that the military is a brutal machine when he witnesses a lieutenant's execution in Antigua. Rooke is injured in battle but two years later, he volunteers to go with the First Fleet to New South Wales as the official astronomer. Rooke feels as though New South Wales is the place where he can truly begin anew, and he takes astronomy very seriously. He constructs an observatory on a cliff a mile away from the main settlement. Rooke is very interested when Lieutenant Gardiner captures two natives to teach the settlers Cadigal, though he's scared when Gardiner later confesses to him that he regrets capturing the men. Rooke soon develops a relationship with a group of women and children who visit his hut. His best language tutor is a young girl named Tagaran, who shares Rooke's love of language and learning. At the beginning, Rooke takes a very scientific approach to recording the vocabulary and grammatical forms of Cadigal, but he soon abandons this system for a more freeform way of recording conversations. By the end of the novel, Rooke has a firm grasp of Cadigal. When a prisoner is caught stealing food, Rooke must attend the public whipping. Warungin attends as well and tries to stop the punishment, which makes Rooke see that the British military is cruel and violent. Rooke continues to distance himself from the settlement and from the British system, but is forced to confront that he is an English soldier when Tagaran asks him to show her how guns work. This process of distancing himself continues when Rooke warns Tagaran about the punitive expedition, and is completed when he decides to not continue with the expedition. Rooke spends the remainder of his life in Antigua, freeing slaves.

Lieutenant Daniel Rooke Quotes in The Lieutenant

The The Lieutenant quotes below are all either spoken by Lieutenant Daniel Rooke or refer to Lieutenant Daniel Rooke. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Language, Communication, and Friendship Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Grove edition of The Lieutenant published in 2008.
Part 1, Chapter 1 Quotes

Rooke puzzled about that idea as he puzzled at his primes. He had never seen a black man, so the issue was abstract, but something about the argument did not cohere. Think as he might, though, he could not find a path around Lancelot Percival's logic.

Page Number: 9
Explanation and Analysis:

In Euclid's company it was if he had been speaking a foreign language all his life, and had just now heard someone else speaking it too.

Related Characters: Lieutenant Daniel Rooke
Page Number: 10
Explanation and Analysis:

To understand any aspect of the cosmos was to look on the face of God: not directly, but by a species of triangulation, because to think mathematically was to feel the action of God in oneself.

He saw others comforted by their ideas of God...what comforted Rooke, on the contrary, was the knowledge that as an individual he did not matter. Whatever he was, he was part of a whole...

That imposed a morality behind the terse handful of commands in the chaplain's book. It was to acknowledge the unity of all things. To injure any was to damage all.

Related Characters: Lieutenant Daniel Rooke
Page Number: 14
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

The slaves were utterly strange, their lives unimaginable, but they walked and spoke, just as he did himself. That speech he had heard was made up of no sounds he could give meaning to, but it was language and joined one human to another, just as his own did.

Page Number: 25
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1, Chapter 3 Quotes

Of course their hair would grow back and they would continue to walk about, and breathe and eat: they were not dead. But they might as well be. They would never again have a place in the world.

Related Characters: Lieutenant Daniel Rooke, Talbot Silk
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:

The firing, the reloading, the ramming, the priming, the firing again: all that was familiar from having been practiced so often. The theory of it was tidy: men firing and then calmly dropping to one knee to reload. What was happening on Resolution bore no resemblance to that.

Related Symbols: Guns
Page Number: 31
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2, Chapter 1 Quotes

It was foreign to Rooke, the idea of taking the real world as nothing more than raw material. His gift lay in measuring, calculating, deducing. Silk's was to cut and embellish until a pebble was transformed into a gem.

Related Characters: Lieutenant Daniel Rooke, Talbot Silk
Page Number: 47
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2, Chapter 3 Quotes

A man on this promontory would be part of the settlement, but not in it. Present, but not forgotten. Astronomy would make a convenient screen for a self that he did not choose to share with any of the other souls marooned along with him.

Related Characters: Lieutenant Daniel Rooke
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2, Chapter 5 Quotes

Gamekeeper! The word suggested the society that Lancelot Percival James had boasted of at the Academy: pheasants and deer in a park artfully planted to enhance the prospect, cheerful peasantry tipping their caps to the squires riding by.

But New South Wales was no gentleman's estate...and the gamekeeper was a criminal who had been given a gun.

Related Symbols: Guns
Page Number: 91
Explanation and Analysis:

Unrelenting newness made for something like blindness. It was as if sight did not function properly in the absence of understanding. Without his pack and his notebook, he hoped that his eyes might begin to make distinctions among all those trees and bushes.

Related Characters: Lieutenant Daniel Rooke
Page Number: 96
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2, Chapter 6 Quotes

Rooke could see that there was a dangerous ambiguity to the presence of a thousand of His Majesty's subjects in this place. No such understanding was possible without language to convey it, and persons to whom the news could be delivered. And yet it seemed that the silence might continue indefinitely.

Page Number: 108
Explanation and Analysis:

Rooke said nothing more. There was a question forming in the back of his mind, which he did not want to hear. It was: What would I have done in the same place?

Page Number: 113
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3, Chapter 1 Quotes

Silk's impulse was to make the strange familiar, to transform it into well-shaped smooth phrases.

His own was to enter that strangeness and lose himself in it.

Related Characters: Lieutenant Daniel Rooke, Talbot Silk
Page Number: 139
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3, Chapter 2  Quotes

But language was more than a list of words, more than a collection of fragments all jumbled together like a box of nuts and bolts. Language was a machine. To make it work, each part had to be understood in relation to all the other parts.

Page Number: 152
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3, Chapter 5 Quotes

Language went in both directions. Without the benefit of notebooks or pencils repaired with string, the natives not only knew many words of English, but had already made them part of their own tongue, altering them as their grammar required. Bread was now breado, not simply borrowed but possessed.

Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:

What had passed between Tagaran and himself had gone far beyond vocabulary or grammatical forms. It was the heart of talking; not just the words and not just the meaning, but the way in which two people had found common ground and begun to discover the true names of things.

Page Number: 186
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3, Chapter 6 Quotes

Warungin was not thinking punishment, justice, impartial. All he could see was that the Berewalgal had gathered in their best clothes to inflict pain beyond imagining on one of their own. Seen through his eyes, this ceremony was not an unfortunate but necessary part of the grand machine of civilization. It looked like a choice. When those fine abstractions fell away, all that remained was cruelty.

Page Number: 198
Explanation and Analysis:

He had made that choice, because he was a lieutenant in His Majesty's Marine Force.

There it was, in the very words. Force was his job. If he was a soldier, he was as much a part of that cruelty as the man who had wielded the whip.

Page Number: 199
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3, Chapter 7 Quotes

He must tell, otherwise what up till now had been simply private would take on the dangerous power of a secret. The task was to tell, but to minimize.

Page Number: 201
Explanation and Analysis:

He had written as in despair in order to indicate that her despair was feigned. To him it had obviously been a joke. What native, even a child, would believe that washing would make them white? He had failed to record the joke on the page, in the same way he failed to note that they were breathing, or that their hearts were beating.

Page Number: 207
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3, Chapter 8 Quotes

They all knew what he had turned his face away from: like it or not, he was Berewalgal. He wore the red coat. He carried the musket when he was told to. He stood by while a man was flogged. He would not confront a white man who had beaten his friends.

Related Symbols: Guns
Page Number: 218
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3, Chapter 9 Quotes

But to shoot a piece of metal out of it that could penetrate a shield or a human body and expose the shambles within: that was of another order of experience. Another language. What it said was, I can kill you.

He did not want her to learn that language. Certainly not from him.

Related Symbols: Guns
Page Number: 224
Explanation and Analysis:

But written down like that, with its little full stop, the possibility of doubt was erased. The meaning would never be questioned again. What had felt like science was the worst kind of guesswork, the kind that forgets it is a guess.

Page Number: 232
Explanation and Analysis:

What he had not learned from Latin or Greek he was learning from the people of New South Wales. It was this: you did not learn a language without entering into a relationship with the people who spoke it with you. His friendship with Tagaran was not a list of objects, or the words for things eaten or not eaten, thrown or not thrown. It was the slow constructing of the map of a relationship.

Page Number: 233
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4, Chapter 4 Quotes

It was the simplest thing in the world. If an action was wrong, it did not matter whether it succeeded or not, or how many clever steps you took to make sure it failed. If you were part of such an act, you were part of its wrong. You did not have to take up the hatchet or even to walk along with the expedition.

Related Symbols: Guns
Page Number: 280
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Lieutenant PDF

Lieutenant Daniel Rooke Character Timeline in The Lieutenant

The timeline below shows where the character Lieutenant Daniel Rooke appears in The Lieutenant. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 1
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On his first day of school, five-year-old Daniel Rooke is happy to experience more of the world. He's already been reading for a year,... (full context)
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Weeks later, a man from the Portsmouth Naval Academy named Dr. Adair comes to Rooke's family home. Rooke doesn't understand why Dr. Adair is there, but knows this visit is... (full context)
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Rooke's father looks uncomfortable. Dr. Adair asks if he can take Rooke's grid to show it... (full context)
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When Rooke turns eight, Dr. Adair sends a letter offering Rooke a place at the Portsmouth Naval... (full context)
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Nobody at the Academy is interested in math like Rooke is. Rooke soon learns that truly smart people hide their cleverness. Conversation proves especially difficult... (full context)
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Rooke slips down to a beach near the harbor when he can, where he keeps a... (full context)
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When the chaplain discovers that Rooke has perfect pitch (i.e., the ability to recognize the pitch of a note), it initially... (full context)
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Rooke develops his conception of God while at the Academy. He realizes that for him, God... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 2
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When Rooke is 13, Dr. Adair takes him to meet Dr. Vickery, the Astronomer Royal, in Greenwich.... (full context)
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Two years later, when Rooke finishes school, he writes to Dr. Vickery and asks if there are any positions available... (full context)
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Rooke makes a globe for his younger sisters out of wire and paper so he can... (full context)
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Rooke receives his uniform and learns how to load his musket. He thinks the musket is... (full context)
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...the ranks quickly, and he sees the war as an opportunity to become a captain. Rooke uses Silk's example and creates a version of himself that can exchange pleasantries and make... (full context)
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For the first year of his service, Rooke isn't involved in fighting. Resolution carries supplies, and war seems leisurely. It also gives Rooke... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3
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One afternoon in Antigua, Rooke learns what the oath to serve and obey truly means. Some officers had begun to... (full context)
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Rooke thinks that every officer had watched the hanging because they had to, and nobody who... (full context)
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Late in 1781, Rooke prepares for his first battle against a French ship. He and Silk take their places,... (full context)
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When Rooke wakes in the hospital in Portsmouth, the doctors tell him he's lucky to be alive.... (full context)
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Rooke sits on the cold pebbles and watches the water, thinking that his life is suspended... (full context)
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As Rooke's health improves, he begins to tutor students in math, astronomy, and languages. Their slowness irritates... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 4
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When Rooke is 24, the King of England decides that the British territory New South Wales should... (full context)
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Rooke tries to think of the expedition to New South Wales as a fresh start, and... (full context)
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Rooke receives a letter from Silk at the same time he receives Dr. Vickery's letter. Silk... (full context)
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Anne pulls out the globe that Rooke made for her when he left for the war in America. He tells her that... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 1
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Rooke makes sure to act the part of an astronomer on board the Sirius, the flagship... (full context)
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Silk is on board the Charlotte at the rear of the fleet, and he and Rooke only see each other when they stop in various ports. When they meet in Rio,... (full context)
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...Captain Barton in the chain of command. Gilbert is an angular and joyless man, though Rooke wonders if it's because he's always in pain. At dinner one night, Surgeon Weymark shares... (full context)
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Every day at noon, Rooke, Captain Barton, and Gilbert make their way to the belly of the ship to the... (full context)
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...decides that Botany Bay is an unsuitable place to settle. He directs the fleet north. Rooke and Gardiner stand at the rail and watch quiet bays go past, and see black... (full context)
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On land, five native men step out from the forest. Rooke thinks they look very much like himself, but very strange nonetheless. They're naked and hold... (full context)
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...Weymark assures the man jovially that a bullet would do the same to his body. Rooke laughs along with the others, but the natives frown. Weymark begins to whistle, and the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2
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The bay is soon named Sydney Cove, and Rooke often looks around in wonder at the strange landscape. Rooke is fascinated by the plate-like... (full context)
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...prisoners into the clearing so that Commodore Gilbert can address everyone. Seeing all the prisoners, Rooke thinks that the balance of power is off: there are about 800 prisoners and only... (full context)
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...the butt of his musket into a few people. The crowd immediately quiets. Seeing this, Rooke begins to plan how to he'll avoid ever having to police the prisoners. (full context)
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The reverend begins his sermon, and Rooke thinks that the reverend's words are possibly intended to provoke the prisoners, who had no... (full context)
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Rooke comes across Silk sitting on a rock and writing. Silk invites Rooke to sit with... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 3
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When Rooke is halfway up the hillside, he stops to look down. He hears the bell chime... (full context)
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As Rooke turns to head back, he notices two native men. They're not looking at him. Rooke... (full context)
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When Rooke brings up his plans for building his observatory on the point with Governor Gilbert, Gilbert... (full context)
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Rooke's plan for the observatory looks strange on paper. After some grumbling, Major Wyatt allows Rooke... (full context)
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It's still early in 1788 when Rooke finishes the observatory, but the comet isn't predicted to appear until the end of the... (full context)
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Rooke spends his nights peering through his telescope at the southern constellations, which he now knows... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 4
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Though Rooke lives at his observatory, he still joins the officers for Sunday dinner. One evening in... (full context)
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Rooke is happy to admire Betsy's portrait if it means he can sit far away from... (full context)
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...will find natives more willing to speak with them. When the governor asks for volunteers, Rooke is the first to jump up. Silk stands next and later teases Rooke for being... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 5
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Rooke sits in the boat and watches Governor Gilbert sitting in the front. Silk and another... (full context)
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...marching order. Gilbert tells the privates to march with "the gamekeeper" (referring to Brugden), and Rooke laughs before realizing that Gilbert was dead serious when he used the term. Rooke thinks... (full context)
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Rooke brings up the rear of the party to record the steps and direction of the... (full context)
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Rooke returns to his records of the march and calculates that they marched four and five... (full context)
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Brugden returns with parrots and an opossum. When Rooke rolls himself into his blanket after dinner, he thinks that there's no place he'd rather... (full context)
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...party finds an open, grassy clearing. Gilbert digs up a handful of dirt and asks Rooke to note this spot, as he believes the soil will be good for agriculture. That... (full context)
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...A sergeant loads all the guns and lays them out, and a private stands guard. Rooke knows that something happened out there, and Brugden isn't telling. He also knows that if... (full context)
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...the morning the party makes its way back to Gardiner and the boat. Gilbert praises Rooke as a "first-rate navigator." Gilbert tells Silk that the area they found was exactly what... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 6
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...describes the land found on the expedition, and says it will be called Rose Hill. Rooke privately thinks the name is ridiculous, as Gilbert says that Captain Lennox will establish a... (full context)
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...when the officers quiet he announces that two more prisoners will join Brugden as gamekeepers. Rooke thinks that they'll soon decimate the animal population in the surrounding woods. Gilbert continues, saying... (full context)
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One day, as Rooke records his readings in his ledger, he looks up to see Gardiner coming up the... (full context)
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...drink. He continues, saying that the natives are now behind the governor's house in shackles. Rooke tries to comfort Gardiner by saying he did his duty in the kindest way, but... (full context)
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Rooke wonders if he has ever received an order that would shame him, but he can't... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
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The next morning, Rooke heads down to the settlement, filled with curiosity about the captured natives. They're not difficult... (full context)
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...older man, Warungin, the native word for "thumb," but Warungin won't meet the governor's eyes. Rooke thinks that these men aren't as dark as the slaves he saw in Antigua, and... (full context)
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Rooke meets Boinbar's eyes, and thinks of how strange it must seem for him to be... (full context)
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Rooke begins to formulate an excuse to visit Gilbert's house so that he might see Boinbar... (full context)
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Rooke is uncomfortable with Silk's questioning, and thinks that Silk just wants an interesting tidbit to... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 8
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October arrives, which is the earliest possible month that Rooke might see Dr. Vickery's comet. He spends every night peering through his telescope and carefully... (full context)
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Rooke only comes down from his observatory for the Sunday lunch. He barely listens to the... (full context)
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Rooke considers asking Silk for advice, but finds he doesn't trust him now that he knows... (full context)
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Out on the boat, Rooke thinks that he's been looking through his telescope for too long. Gardiner catches a fish... (full context)
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...it's clear that the comet isn't going to appear. To justify staying at the observatory, Rooke decides to pick up where the astronomer Lacaille left off, mapping the stars of the... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1
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One day, a drummer boy comes running up to Rooke's observatory. Rooke believes that boy will have a note asking Rooke to leave the observatory,... (full context)
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Silk tells Rooke that the natives have been trickling in, and he pulls Rooke along to follow the... (full context)
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Willstead comes up next to Rooke and Silk and comments that the "savages" are dirty. The men seem to understand Willstead's... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 2 
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The next morning, Rooke emerges from his hut and sees two natives standing at the top of the hill.... (full context)
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Warungin mimes using a telescope, gestures into the distance, and says "berewal" again. Rooke mimics Warungin and finally understands that "berewal" means something along the lines of "a great... (full context)
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Rooke wants to learn more, but Warungin gets up. Though Rooke doesn’t detect any signal, a... (full context)
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The children hide behind the women's legs, but Rooke catches the eye of a young boy and manages to wink at him. The boy... (full context)
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It begins to rain. Rooke looks outside, sticks his hand out to catch a few drops, and then turns to... (full context)
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Rooke comments in English about the downpour, and wonders why he can make small talk now... (full context)
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...boy and two women saunter out of the hut. The girl speaks another word that Rooke struggles to repeat. He doesn't know what it means, but he thinks that the clear... (full context)
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Rooke pulls down a notebook and writes down Tagaran's name as well as the two other... (full context)
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Rooke draws up columns in his notebooks to organize the words he learns alphabetically. Then, he... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 3
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The natives don't return for a week, and Rooke is almost angry, but when the little boy barrels down the path towards Rooke, his... (full context)
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Rooke points to himself and says his name, and then points to Tagaran and says her... (full context)
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Rooke points to his head and makes a curious face. Tagaran understands immediately, and begins pointing... (full context)
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Rooke begins acting out other verbs, which sends all of them into fits of laughter. Even... (full context)
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Rooke takes his jacket back, puts it on, and takes it off again. Tagaran copies the... (full context)
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When Rooke takes his shoes off later, he realizes his feet are extremely dirty. He then realizes... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 4
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A week later, the Cadigal haven't yet visited Rooke again. Silk arrives, looking upset, and explains that Lennox has been complaining to Governor Gilbert... (full context)
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...sarcastically that an uprising from the prisoners or an attack by natives would be fantastic. Rooke thinks that he should tell Silk that the natives have been visiting him, but thinks... (full context)
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Silk asks Rooke if he has heard that Lieutenant Gardiner is being sent to Norfolk Island with some... (full context)
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Rooke thinks that he has allowed himself to feel as though he's his own man, when... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 5
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Rooke learns the names of several women who visit the observatory. The tall woman is Barringan,... (full context)
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When Warungin comes with other men, he abandons his stern face and tells stories. Rooke can't follow, but he does recognize some of the settlers that Warungin mimics. Occasionally, Warungin... (full context)
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After Warungin's lesson, the children join Rooke at the hut. Tagaran, Boneda, and Worogan always come, sometimes accompanied by two girls named... (full context)
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As Tagaran gives Rooke more words, he abandons his system and starts using a pencil rather than ink. He... (full context)
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One afternoon, Tagaran runs into the hut, wet and covered in goose bumps. She tells Rooke to get out of her way of the fire, and says a word that Rooke... (full context)
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Rooke instantly regrets that he touched Tagaran, and thinks of how he'd feel if some native... (full context)
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Rooke takes his time recording their conversation. When he's done, Tagaran is dry and he has... (full context)
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When Rooke finishes, Tagaran picks up the kettle and asks permission to pour the leftover warm water... (full context)
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Rooke takes Tagaran's hands and lathers them with soap. He gently wipes her face with a... (full context)
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As evening comes, the women pick up their babies. Rooke sees Tagaran and Worogan whispering together, and Tagaran speaks to Rooke and makes a sleeping... (full context)
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Rooke shares his dinner with Tagaran and Worogan, and makes sweet tea with the warraburra leaves.... (full context)
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Rooke records the joke he and Tagaran shared earlier in his notebook, and adds an explanation... (full context)
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A few minutes later, Tagaran calls to Rooke. When he asks in her language why she isn't sleeping, she asks him to "put... (full context)
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Rooke feels warm with the girls sleeping in the hut. He gets up, pours himself a... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 6
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Silk sends Rooke letters from Rose Hill describing how boring and quiet it is. Rooke finds the letters... (full context)
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All the marines, most of the prisoners, and Warungin attend the flogging. Rooke sees that the thief is already sweating in fearful anticipation. Warungin seems unconcerned, as if... (full context)
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...because he stole food. He says simply that if people steal, they must be punished. Rooke can't tell whether Warungin understands. The flogger appears, and Rooke turns his attention to thinking... (full context)
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...prisoner must be punished. Warungin looks away from the prisoner, but flinches with every lash. Rooke thinks that this is supposed to be noble, impartial justice, but realizes it doesn't seem... (full context)
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Rooke looks to Warungin, who looks almost ready to vomit. Gilbert touches Warungin's arm and offers... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 7
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...calls Silk back from Rose Hill at the beginning of summer. When Silk complains to Rooke about how boring it was, Rooke assures him that he'll be able to make something... (full context)
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As Rooke tries to organize his thoughts to tell Silk, Silk finds Rooke's notebooks of the Cadigal... (full context)
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Silk finally opens Rooke's notebook and begins reading. He praises Rooke's work and sits back. Rooke unhappily thinks he'll... (full context)
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...that he wanted to include more of the language in his narrative. Silk asks if Rooke would be open to adding the contents of his notebooks to Silk's narrative as an... (full context)
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Rooke watches surprise cross Silk's face. Silk reads out loud what Rooke wrote about the joke... (full context)
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Rooke is confused for a moment, and then understands Silk's meaning. He blushes and then yells... (full context)
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Rooke thinks that if he were a man of the world, he would've realized how Silk... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 8
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A week later, Tagaran, Tugear, and Worogan race down the path to Rooke's hut, yelling for him. They're breathless and crying, and Tagaran's arm is covered in blood.... (full context)
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Rooke takes Tagaran's hands in his own and gently inspects her swollen hand. Tagaran pulls her... (full context)
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Rooke tells the girls that he's very angry, but he knows he doesn't sound angry. Tagaran... (full context)
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Rooke imagines approaching the captain of the Charlotte and reporting the incident. He imagines the soldier... (full context)
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Rooke asks Tagaran if her finger is better, and he thinks her reply means that her... (full context)
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Alone, Rooke feels as though he has failed. He imagines again approaching the captain of the Charlotte... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 9
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Rooke considers destroying his notebooks after making copies that omit parts that would be easily misunderstood.... (full context)
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Rooke takes the gun from Tagaran, but she picks it back up and, with gestures, asks... (full context)
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Somehow, Tagaran knows there's more. Rooke shows her how the gun creates a spark, but Tagaran insists on seeing the powder.... (full context)
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Tagaran isn't fooled. She knows that the bullet didn't leave the barrel. Rooke wishes she were stupid as she mimes what she wants to see. Rooke refuses. He... (full context)
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Rooke realizes he's angry. Tagaran spits out angry words that Rooke can't understand in reply, and... (full context)
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Rooke sits on his bed and wonders why Tagaran wanted to know how to fire a... (full context)
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The next day, Rooke follows the track the natives normally take towards their settlement. When he's close enough to... (full context)
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Rooke recalls telling Tagaran about Portsmouth. He'd told her that there's a harbor, and he'd remembered... (full context)
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Rooke wonders what it's like to be Tagaran and walk around naked and barefoot. He looks... (full context)
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At his hut, Rooke gets out his notebooks. He understands that Tagaran likely won't return, and the notebooks are... (full context)
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Rooke edits several of his entries to encompass some of his doubt, including the one about... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 1
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A messenger boy runs to Rooke's hut and tells him that the natives have speared Brugden and he's going to die.... (full context)
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...natives never fight fairly. He insists that the word "treachery" isn't even in their vocabulary. Rooke thinks he doesn't know if this is true or not, but he thinks that even... (full context)
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The next day, Rooke jumps up when he hears footsteps, hoping it's Tagaran. It's Silk, with a serious look... (full context)
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Silk says that he told Gilbert that Rooke would certainly join the expedition, along with Willstead and 30 privates. Rooke tries to imagine... (full context)
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Rooke tries to distract Silk by telling him that Cadigal grammar uses the dual plural and... (full context)
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Silk says warmly that the natives hide so well, they'll never find anyone. Rooke thinks that this is true, and 33 men stomping through the woods will be impossible... (full context)
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As Rooke reads that evening, he wishes Gardiner were there to give him advice. Rooke remembers their... (full context)
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Rooke thinks that he had never allowed himself to stop and wonder what he's actually doing... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 2
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Rather than seek out Warungin or Boinbar, Rooke walks towards the settlement and hopes he runs into one of the natives. He comes... (full context)
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...the doorway. The two hesitantly sit at the table and after a moment of silence, Rooke asks Tagaran in English why the black man hurt the white man. In Cadigal, she... (full context)
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Rooke reminds Tagaran of when she asked him to show her how the musket worked. He... (full context)
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Rooke continues, and says that tomorrow, they're going out after six men. He asks Tagaran in... (full context)
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Tagaran goes to the fire and warms her hands. She returns to Rooke and gestures for his hands, and then warms his with hers. She says "putuwa," and... (full context)
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Tagaran tells Rooke she has to go. They look at each other, and Rooke thinks they both understand... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 3
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At the parade ground the next morning, Rooke and Willstead listen to Silk enthusiastically describe his plan to trap the natives on a... (full context)
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...taking a break at the hut that Brugden built to use during his hunting expeditions. Rooke thinks about Brugden and the other gamekeepers sitting here, and realizes that just like he's... (full context)
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...halt and tells the men to rest for an hour before they attack the camp. Rooke lies down and wishes the expedition were over. In his mind, he goes over the... (full context)
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...a different direction and they'll all advance in ten minutes to form a human chain. Rooke leads his men to the north and after ten minutes leads them forward. When they... (full context)
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...of the river. After a moment, Silk commands the men to fire at the natives. Rooke loads his musket slowly and clumsily, but he sees that the other soldiers are eager... (full context)
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...the soldiers points to the water and yells that there's a native there. Silk tells Rooke and Willstead not to look. Willstead is confused and begins to prepare his gun, but... (full context)
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...asks where Carangaray is. Warungin frowns and begins speaking and miming in Cadigal. Silk asks Rooke to translate, but Rooke truthfully replies that Warungin spoke too fast for him to understand.... (full context)
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...a while later with eight fish. He cooks them and offers some to the soldiers. Rooke lies down and feels more relaxed. He thinks that they'll tramp around for a few... (full context)
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Rooke thinks that Silk will certainly give the governor a detailed account of what happened, and... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 4
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Silk, Willstead, Rooke, and Warungin sit together by the fire quietly while the 30 privates throw a party... (full context)
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Rooke asks Silk if Surgeon Weymark asked him to bring back trophies to paint, or if... (full context)
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Rooke asks for an explanation of the hatchet and bags. Silk explains that if capturing the... (full context)
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Rooke looks back to Willstead and Warungin at the fire, trying to talk about something. He... (full context)
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When Rooke is finished vomiting, he walks down to the beach and watches the waves. Rooke thinks... (full context)
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Rooke looks at the sky and sees the constellation Sirius. He thinks that the natives probably... (full context)
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Rooke thinks that the man he was when he first arrived on the shore in New... (full context)
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Rooke remembers the man who hung in Antigua, and the two others who were humiliated and... (full context)
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When Rooke returns to the campsite, he rolls himself into his blanket like the others. He waits... (full context)
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Rooke spent the night rehearsing what he would say to the governor, but now all he... (full context)
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Wyatt snaps at Rooke to stop talking like that. Rooke realizes that Wyatt is trying to push Rooke back... (full context)
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The governor reprimands Rooke and asks him to come see him at noon. He and Major Wyatt stride away.... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 1
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Fifty years later, Rooke still spends his time watching the stars. They didn't hang him for his defiance but... (full context)
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Rooke lies awake in the dark, waiting for sunrise. He knows that death will come for... (full context)
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Rooke thinks that it's melodramatic to say that he gave his life for the slaves. He... (full context)
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Rooke bought Henrietta at an auction, along with many other slaves. He began keeping track of... (full context)
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Rooke wonders if he should regret the decision he made to defy the governor in New... (full context)
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Rooke thinks of "putuwa," the word that Tagaran taught him. He thinks that it's dusk in... (full context)
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On Rooke's last morning in New South Wales, he woke early. It had only been a month... (full context)
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Rooke could see a few natives on the point, including Tagaran. She had come to see... (full context)
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Rooke and Tagaran looked at each for a moment when the men arrived to carry Rooke's... (full context)