The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

by

C. S. Lewis

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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe: Chapter 10 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Back at the Mr. Beaver and Mrs. Beaver’s house, Peter, Susan, and Lucy hurriedly gather food and supplies for the journey. They want to leave now and get a head start—they doubt they can beat the Witch to the Stone Table, but know that by taking sneaky ways through the woods, they can avoid a confrontation. As the children and the Beavers walk through the wood, Lucy grows increasingly tired beneath her heavy load. After several hours, the Beavers burrow into a small cave for some rest, and invite the children to do the same. Mrs. Beaver gives everyone a bit of whiskey, and soon they all fall asleep.
The Beavers want the children to be safe and even comfortable despite the chaos, fear, and discord all around them. They are helpful and nurturing guides through the harsh and confusing world of Narnia, and are allegiant to the children to the point of risking their own safety and well-being to ensure that of Peter, Susan, and Lucy.
Themes
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
In the morning, the group awakes to the sound of jingling bells. Mr. Beaver heads out to investigate, worried that the Witch has arrived in her sledge. Once above ground, though, he cries out in delight for everyone to come outside. At the mouth of the cave there is a sledge pulled by reindeer—it is not the Witch’s sledge, though, but that of Father Christmas. He rejoices that he has at last gotten into Narnia—the Witch’s magic, he says, is weakening now that Aslan is on the move.
Father Christmas’s return is a joyous event for the denizens of Narnia, who have not seen Christmas in some time, due to the Witch’s commitment to ensuring that it is “always winter, but never Christmas.” Father Christmas’s arrival signals that the Witch’s power is waning, and that her despotic reign may finally be coming to an end.
Themes
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Related Quotes
Father Christmas delivers presents to the Beavers—he has a sewing machine for Mrs. Beaver, and he tells Mr. Beaver that when he returns home he will find his dam finished and repaired. Father Christmas turns to the children and presents them with their presents, which are tools, he says, not toys. For Peter, he has a shield and a sword; for Susan, a bow and a quiver of arrows along with a little ivory horn; for Lucy, a diamond bottle of restorative cordial and a small dagger. Father Christmas warns them that they will all need to use their new tools in the battle to come. Before leaving, Father Christmas gives them all tea and biscuits, bids them all a Merry Christmas, and calls out “Long live the true King!”
Father Christmas symbolizes the bounty Christianity provides—not in terms of material gain, but in terms of accruing “tools” to help one move through the world. As he bestows these gifts upon Susan, Lucy, and Peter, it becomes clear that the three of them will have a significant role to play in the upcoming battle—a battle that will determine the fate of the realm and whether the Witch’s bleak winter or Aslan’s joyous spring will ultimately win out.
Themes
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon