The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

by

C. S. Lewis

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe can help.

Lucy Character Analysis

Lucy, who is Peter, Susan, and Edmund’s youngest sister, is in many ways the primary protagonist of the novel. She is the first of her siblings to happen upon the world of Narnia, and is arguably the most deeply invested in returning the magical realm to peace and prosperity. Lucy is deeply kind, inquisitive, and open; as the youngest of all her siblings, she is the most naïve but also the most in touch with wonder, magic, and the ability to believe in goodness, righteousness, and fantastical things. She is a loyal friend to Mr. Tumnus, the first creature she met in Narnia, and even convinces her siblings to remain to put themselves in danger to help him. She and Susan also have a special, tender relationship with Aslan, as they are the ones who witness his death, which echoes Jesus Christ’s Crucifixion. By the end of her long reign of Narnia, Lucy is renowned for her valiance and fairness.

Lucy Quotes in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe quotes below are all either spoken by Lucy or refer to Lucy. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the HarperCollins edition of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe published in 1950.
Chapter 2 Quotes

“But what have you done?” asked Lucy.

“My old father, now,” said Mr. Tumnus; “that's his picture over the mantelpiece. He would never have done a thing like this.”

“A thing like what?” said Lucy.

“Like what I've done,” said the Faun. “Taken service under the White Witch. That's what I am. I'm in the pay of the White Witch.”

“The White Witch? Who is she?”

“Why, it is she that has got all Narnia under her thumb. It's she that makes it always winter. Always winter and never Christmas; think of that!”

“How awful!” said Lucy.

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Mr. Tumnus (speaker), The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 19
Explanation and Analysis:

“I had orders from the White Witch that if ever I saw a Son of Adam or a Daughter of Eve in the wood, I was to catch them and hand them over to her. And you are the first I’ve ever met. And I've pretended to be your friend and asked you to tea, and all the time I've been meaning to wait till you were asleep and then go and tell Her.”

“Oh, but you won't, Mr. Tumnus,” said Lucy. “You won't, will you? Indeed, indeed you really mustn't.”

“And if I don't,” said he, beginning to cry again, “she's sure to find out. And she'll have my tail cut off, and my horns sawn off, and my beard plucked out, and she'll wave her wand over my beautiful cloven hoofs and turn them into horrid solid hoofs like a wretched horse's. And if she is extra and specially angry she'll turn me into stone and I shall be only a statue of a Faun in her horrible house until the four thrones at Cair Paravel are filled-and goodness knows when that will happen, or whether it will ever happen at all.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Mr. Tumnus (speaker), The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

While he was eating the Queen kept asking him questions. At first Edmund tried to remember that it is rude to speak with one's mouth full, but soon he forgot about this and thought only of trying to shovel down as much Turkish Delight as he could, and the more he ate the more he wanted to eat, and he never asked himself why the Queen should be so inquisitive. She got him to tell her that he had one brother and two sisters, and that one of his sisters had already been in Narnia and had met a Faun there, and that no one except himself and his brother and his sisters knew anything about Narnia. She seemed especially interested in the fact that there were four of them, and kept on coming back to it. “You are sure there are just four of you?” she asked. “Two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve, neither more nor less?” and Edmund, with his mouth full of Turkish Delight, kept on saying, “Yes, I told you that before,” and forgetting to call her “Your Majesty,” but she didn't seem to mind now. At last the Turkish Delight was all finished and Edmund was looking very hard at the empty box and wishing that she would ask him whether he would like some more. Probably the Queen knew quite well what he was thinking; for she knew, though Edmund did not, that this was enchanted Turkish Delight and that anyone who had once tasted it would want more and more of it, and would even, if they were allowed, go on eating it till they killed themselves.

Related Characters: Edmund (speaker), The White Witch / The Queen (speaker), Lucy, Susan, Peter
Page Number: 37
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

“Peter! Susan! It’s all true. Edmund has seen it too. There is a country you can get to through the wardrobe. Edmund and I both got in. We met one another in there, in the wood. Go on, Edmund; tell them all about it.”

“What's all this about, Ed?” said Peter.

And now we come to one of the nastiest things in this story. Up to that moment Edmund had been feeling sick, and sulky, and annoyed with Lucy for being right, but he hadn't made up his mind what to do. When Peter suddenly asked him the question he decided all at once to do the meanest and most spiteful thing he could think of. He decided to let Lucy down.

“Tell us, Ed,” said Susan.

And Edmund gave a very superior look as if he were far older than Lucy (there was really only a year's difference) and then a little snigger and said, “Oh, yes, Lucy and I have been playing—pretending that all her story about a country in the wardrobe is true. Just for fun, of course. There's nothing there really.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Edmund (speaker), Susan (speaker), Peter (speaker)
Page Number: 44-45
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

“So you really were here,” [Peter] said, “that time Lu said she'd met you in here—and you made out she was telling lies.”

There was a dead silence. “Well, of all the poisonous little beasts—” said Peter, and shrugged his shoulders and said no more. There seemed, indeed, no more to say, and presently the four resumed their journey; but Edmund was saying to himself. “I'll pay you all out for this, you pack of stuck-up, self-satisfied prigs.”

Related Characters: Peter (speaker), Lucy, Edmund
Page Number: 56
Explanation and Analysis:

“I-I wonder if there's any point in going on,” said Susan. “I mean, it doesn't seem particularly safe here and it looks as if it won't be much fun either. And it's getting colder every minute, and we've brought nothing to eat. What about just going home?”

“Oh, but we can't, we can't,” said Lucy suddenly; “don't you see? We can't just go home, not after this. It is all on my account that the poor Faun has got into this trouble. He hid me from the Witch and showed me the way back. That's what it means by comforting the Queen's enemies and fraternizing with Humans. We simply must try to rescue him.”

[…]

“I've a horrid feeling that Lu is right,” said Susan. “I don't want to go a step further and I wish we'd never come. But I think we must try to do something for Mr. Whatever-his-name-is—I mean the Faun.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Susan (speaker), Edmund, Peter, Mr. Tumnus
Page Number: 59-60
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

“They say Aslan is on the move—perhaps has already landed.”

And now a very curious thing happened. None of the children knew who Aslan was any more than you do; but the moment the Beaver had spoken these words everyone felt quite different. Perhaps it has sometimes happened to you in a dream that someone says something which you don't understand but in the dream it feels as if it had some enormous meaning—either a terrifying one which turns the whole dream into a nightmare or else a lovely meaning too lovely to put into words, which makes the dream so beautiful that you remember it all your life and are always wishing you could get into that dream again. It was like that now. At the name of Aslan each one of the children felt something jump in its inside. Edmund felt a sensation of mysterious horror. Peter felt suddenly brave and adventurous. Susan felt as if some delicious smell or some delightful strain of music had just floated by her. And Lucy got the feeling you have when you wake up in the morning and realize that it is the beginning of the holidays or the beginning of summer.

Related Characters: Mr. Beaver (speaker), Lucy, Edmund, Susan, Peter, Aslan
Page Number: 67-68
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

“Is he—quite safe? I shall feel rather nervous about meeting a lion.”

“That you will, dearie, and no mistake,” said Mrs. Beaver; “if there's anyone who can appear before Aslan without their knees knocking, they're either braver than most or else just silly.”

“Then he isn't safe?” said Lucy.

"Safe?” said Mr. Beaver; “don't you hear what Mrs. Beaver tells you? Who said anything about safe? 'Course he isn't safe. But he's good. He's the King, I tell you.”

“I'm longing to see him,” said Peter, “even if I do feel frightened when it comes to the point.”

[…]

“The quickest way you can help [Mr. Tumnus] is by going to meet Aslan,” said Mr. Beaver, “once he's with us, then we can begin doing things. Not that we don't need you too. For that's another of the old rhymes:

When Adam's flesh and Adam's bone Sits at Cair Paravel in throne,

The evil time will be over and done.

So things must be drawing near their end now he's come and you've come.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Susan (speaker), Peter (speaker), Mr. Beaver (speaker), Mrs. Beaver (speaker), Aslan, Mr. Tumnus
Page Number: 80-81
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

You mustn't think that even now Edmund was quite so bad that he actually wanted his brother and sisters to be turned into stone. He did want Turkish Delight and to be a Prince (and later a King) and to pay Peter out for calling him a beast. As for what the Witch would do with the others, he didn't want her to be particularly nice to them—certainly not to put them on the same level as himself; but he managed to believe, or to pretend he believed, that she wouldn't do anything very bad to them, “Because,” he said to himself, “all these people who say nasty things about her are her enemies and probably half of it isn't true. She was jolly nice to me, anyway, much nicer than they are. I expect she is the rightful Queen really. Anyway, she'll be better than that awful Aslan!” At least, that was the excuse he made in his own mind for what he was doing. It wasn't a very good excuse, however, for deep down inside him he really knew that the White Witch was bad and cruel.

Related Characters: Edmund (speaker), Lucy, Susan, Peter, Aslan, The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

“Come on!” cried Mr. Beaver, who was almost dancing with delight. “Come and see! This is a nasty knock for the Witch! It looks as if her power is already crumbling.”

[…]

It was a sledge, and it was reindeer with bells on their harness. […] And on the sledge sat a person whom everyone knew the moment they set eyes on him. He was a huge man in a bright red robe (bright as hollyberries) with a hood that had fur inside it and a great white beard that fell like a foamy waterfall over his chest. Everyone knew him because, though you see people of his sort only in Narnia, you see pictures of them and hear them talked about even in our world—the world on this side of the wardrobe door. But when you really see them in Narnia it is rather different. Some of the pictures of Father Christmas in our world make him look only funny and jolly. But now that the children actually stood looking at him they didn't find it quite like that. He was so big, and so glad, and so real, that they all became quite still. They felt very glad, but also solemn.

“I've come at last,” said he. “She has kept me out for a long time, but I have got in at last. Aslan is on the move. The Witch's magic is weakening.”

Related Characters: Mr. Beaver (speaker), Lucy, Susan, Peter, The White Witch / The Queen, Mrs. Beaver
Related Symbols: Father Christmas
Page Number: 106-107
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 12 Quotes

But as for Aslan himself, the Beavers and the children didn't know what to do or say when they saw him. People who have not been in Narnia sometimes think that a thing cannot be good and terrible at the same time. If the children had ever thought so, they were cured of it now. For when they tried to look at Aslan's face they just caught a glimpse of the golden mane and the great, royal, solemn, overwhelming eyes; and then they found they couldn't look at him and went all trembly.

Related Characters: Lucy, Susan, Peter, Aslan, Mr. Beaver, Mrs. Beaver
Page Number: 126
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 14 Quotes

At last the rabble had had enough of this. They began to drag the bound and muzzled Lion to the Stone Table, some pulling and some pushing. He was so huge that even when they got him there it took all their efforts to hoist him onto the surface of it. Then there was more tying and tightening of cords.

“The cowards! The cowards!” sobbed Susan. “Are they still afraid of him, even now?”

Related Characters: Susan (speaker), Lucy, Aslan, The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 154
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 15 Quotes

As soon as the wood was silent again Susan and Lucy crept out onto the open hilltop. The moon was getting low and thin clouds were passing across her, but still they could see the shape of the Lion lying dead in his bonds. And down they both knelt in the wet grass and kissed his cold face and stroked his beautiful fur—what was left of it—and cried till they could cry no more. And then they looked at each other and held each other’s hands for mere loneliness and cried again; and then again were silent.

Related Characters: Lucy, Susan, Aslan
Page Number: 157
Explanation and Analysis:

“Oh, you're real, you're real! Oh, Aslan!” cried Lucy, and both girls flung themselves upon him and covered him with kisses.

“But what does it all mean?” asked Susan when they were somewhat calmer.

“It means,” said Aslan, “that though the Witch knew the Deep Magic, there is a magic deeper still which she did not know. Her knowledge goes back only to the dawn of time. But if she could have looked a little further back, into the stillness and the darkness before Time dawned, she would have read there a different incantation. She would have known that when a willing victim who had committed no treachery was killed in a traitor's stead, the Table would crack and Death itself would start working backward. And now—”

“Oh yes. Now?” said Lucy, jumping up and clapping her hands.

“Oh, children,” said the Lion, “I feel my strength coming back to me.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Susan (speaker), Aslan (speaker), The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 163
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 17 Quotes

“I know not how it is, but this lamp on the post worketh upon me strangely. It runs in my mind that I have seen the like before; as it were in a dream, or in the dream of a dream.”

“Sir,” answered they all, “it is even so with us also.”

“And more,” said Queen Lucy, “for it will not go out of my mind that if we pass this post and lantern either we shall find strange adventures or else some great change of our fortunes.”

“Madam,” said King Edmund, “the like foreboding stirreth in my heart also.”

“And in mine, fair brother,” said King Peter.

“And in mine too,” said Queen Susan. “Wherefore by my counsel we shall lightly return to our horses and follow this White Stag no further.”

“Madam,” said King Peter, “therein I pray thee to have me excused. For never since we four were Kings and Queens in Narnia have we set our hands to any high matter, as battles, quests, feats of arms, acts of justice, and the like, and then given over; but always what we have taken in hand, the same we have achieved.”

“Sister,” said Queen Lucy, “my royal brother speaks rightly. And it seems to me we should be shamed if for any fearing or foreboding we turned back from following so noble a beast as now we have in chase.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Edmund (speaker), Susan (speaker), Peter (speaker)
Page Number: 186-187
Explanation and Analysis:

The Professor, who was a very remarkable man, didn't tell them not to be silly or not to tell lies, but believed the whole story. “No,” he said, “I don't think it will be any good trying to go back through the wardrobe door to get the coats. You won't get into Narnia again by that route. Nor would the coats be much use by now if you did! Eh? What's that? Yes, of course you'll get back to Narnia again someday. Once a King in Narnia, always a King in Narnia. But don't go trying to use the same route twice. Indeed, don't try to get there at all. It'll happen when you're not looking for it. And don't talk too much about it even among yourselves. And don't mention it to anyone else unless you find that they've had adventures of the same sort themselves. What's that? How will you know? Oh, you'll know all right. Odd things they say—even their looks—will let the secret out. Keep your eyes open.”

Related Characters: The Professor (speaker), Lucy, Edmund, Susan, Peter
Page Number: 188-189
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe PDF

Lucy Character Timeline in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The timeline below shows where the character Lucy appears in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Lucy Looks into a Wardrobe
War Theme Icon
Siblings Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy have been sent away from London to the countryside because of the air-raids taking place... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...wardrobe. Peter, declaring there’s nothing to see in the room, leads the others onward, but Lucy stays behind, curious about what is inside the wardrobe. (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Lucy opens the door and finds several long fur coats hanging inside. She loves the smell... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
Lucy is frightened, but excited, too. Behind her, she can see the open door of the... (full context)
Chapter 2: What Lucy Found There
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
As the Faun (Mr. Tumnus) scrambles to pick up all his parcels, he asks Lucy if she is a “Daughter of Eve.” She replies that her name is Lucy, and... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The faun introduces himself to Lucy as Mr. Tumnus, and asks why Lucy has come to Narnia. Lucy asks what Narnia... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
Mr. Tumnus leads Lucy to the warm cave where he lives. He boils tea and makes a delicious meal,... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Lucy offers Mr. Tumnus a handkerchief and asks what the matter is. He confesses through his... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Lucy asks Mr. Tumnus to let her go home. He says that he of course will,... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
At the lamp-post, Mr. Tumnus apologizes again to Lucy, and asks for her forgiveness. Lucy wishes Mr. Tumnus well and bids him goodbye, returning... (full context)
Chapter 3: Edmund and the Wardrobe
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Lucy runs into the hall and joins her three siblings, reassuring them that everything is all... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
When Lucy opens the wardrobe for her siblings, however, they find that it is an ordinary piece... (full context)
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
For the next few days, Lucy is “miserable.” She cannot bring herself to say that Narnia was a lie—she is a... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...to play hide-and-seek inside the house. Susan is “It,” and counts while her siblings hide. Lucy returns to the wardrobe room, and decides to have just one more look inside of... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
Edmund jumps into the wardrobe and feels around for Lucy, but cannot find her. He begins calling for her, and soon finds that he, too,... (full context)
Chapter 4: Turkish Delight
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...make their visit to her castle “a surprise for them.” She tells Edmund that if Lucy met a Faun, she has surely heard “nasty stories” about the Queen. Edmund begs for... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
After the sledge departs, Edmund hears Lucy calling for him. She is excited to see that he has made it through to... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...to hear that he has made friends with a dangerous witch. He asks who told Lucy about the White Witch—when she reveals it was Mr. Tumnus the Faun who told her,... (full context)
Chapter 5: Back on This Side of the Door
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Lucy and Edmund return to find that the game of hide-and-seek is still going on, and... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
Peter reprimands Edmund for being “beastly” to Lucy and setting her off. Edmund protests that Lucy has been spouting nonsense. Peter replies that... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
When they encounter Lucy again, she has clearly been crying. She tells the others that she doesn’t care what... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...listens thoughtfully to Peter and Susan’s story, and then asks them how they know that Lucy isn’t telling the truth. Susan tells him that Edmund accused Lucy of lying. The Professor,... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...not exactly surprise him. Peter and Susan as the Professor what they should do about Lucy, and he advises them to try minding their own business; with that, the conversation is... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
...their conversation with the Professor, Peter and Susan try hard to make things better for Lucy. Peter gets Edmund to stop teasing her, and no one brings the wardrobe up at... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
...going on. One morning, Peter and Edmund are playing near a suit of armor when Lucy and Susan rush into the room and warn them to get out of the way—Mrs.... (full context)
Chapter 6: Into the Forest
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...a light in the corner of the wardrobe. Peter realizes that they have “got into Lucy’s wood after all.” The children all stand up and make their way to the back... (full context)
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...to Narnia before after all, he calls him a “poisonous little beast.” Peter, Susan, and Lucy head onward, and Edmund lags behind them, planning on how he will “pay [them] all... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Peter suggests Lucy act as the leader, since she is the most familiar with Narnia. Lucy decides to... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Susan and Peter are frightened, and ask Lucy to explain what’s going on. She tells them that the Queen is actually the horrible... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Lucy spots a robin on a tree branch, and observes that it seems like it wants... (full context)
Chapter 7: A Day with the Beavers
War Theme Icon
After a while, the robin stops leading the children through the wood and flies away. Lucy and Edmund are frightened, worried that they have walked into a trap, but Susan points... (full context)
War Theme Icon
...know the beaver is on their side, and the beaver holds up a little white cloth—Lucy recognizes it as the handkerchief she gave to Mr. Tumnus. The beaver reveals that Mr.... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
...bravery; Susan feels as if she has just smelled something delicious or heard beautiful music; Lucy feels excited, as if it is the morning of a holiday. (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Lucy asks where Mr. Tumnus has gone, but the beaver insists that before they discuss any... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
...Adam and the Daughters of Eve. Mrs. Beaver boils potatoes and sets the table with Lucy and Susan’s help, while Mr. Beaver and Peter go out to catch some fish for... (full context)
Chapter 8: What Happened after Dinner
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
...become of him. Mr. Beaver explains that Tumnus has been taken to the Witch’s house. Lucy asks what will happen to him there, and Mr. Beaver predicts that he will be... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Mr. Beaver tells the children they’ll understand Aslan’s power when they finally meet him. Lucy asks if Aslan is a man—Mr. Beaver reveals that Aslan is a great lion. The... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
Lucy suddenly realizes that Edmund is not sitting at the table. The group looks about frantically... (full context)
Chapter 10: The Spell Begins to Break
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Back at the Mr. Beaver and Mrs. Beaver’s house, Peter, Susan, and Lucy hurriedly gather food and supplies for the journey. They want to leave now and get... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...Susan, a bow and a quiver of arrows along with a little ivory horn; for Lucy, a diamond bottle of restorative cordial and a small dagger. Father Christmas warns them that... (full context)
Chapter 12: Peter’s First Battle
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Miles away, the Mr. Beaver, Mrs. Beaver, Peter, Lucy, and Susan are still making their way to the Stone Table; they, too, are surprised... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
At last, the group reaches the clearing where the Stone Table is. Peter, Susan, and Lucy take in the sight of the landmark—it is a huge slab of grey stone inlaid... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Peter bravely approaches Aslan, and Aslan greets Peter, Susan, Lucy, Mr. Beaver and Mrs. Beaver warmly. His voice has a calming effect. Aslan asks where... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
While Lucy and Susan are whisked away to be prepared for dinner, Aslan brings Peter to a... (full context)
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...out at the Stone Table, and members of Aslan’s army are scattered in every direction. Lucy runs towards Peter with fear; Susan is being chased up a tree by Maugrim. Peter... (full context)
Chapter 13: Deep Magic from the Dawn of Time
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
In the morning, Peter, Susan, and Lucy awake to the news that Edmund has been brought back to camp in the middle... (full context)
Chapter 14: The Triumph of the Witch
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
As they reach their new encampment and begin to unpack, Susan and Lucy notice how sad Aslan looks. Indeed, as the camp comes together, Aslan’s poor mood begins... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Susan and Lucy creep out of their tent and see Aslan walking away into the wood. They decide... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Susan and Lucy beg Aslan to tell them what’s the matter; he replies only that he is sad... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Susan and Lucy hide in the bushes and watch as Aslan approaches a great crowd standing around the... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
...Narnia forever; she wants him to “despair” in that knowledge before he dies. Susan and Lucy look away, unable to bear watching as Aslan is killed. (full context)
Chapter 15: Deeper Magic from Before the Dawn of Time
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Lucy and Susan hear the Witch calling out to her minions to follow her as she... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
The sky begins to lighten, and Susan and Lucy, freezing cold, walk to the edge of the hill. As dawn rises around them, they... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
...restored to life—his mane has grown back, and he looks stronger than ever. Susan and Lucy are amazed to see Aslan resurrected; they run to him and cover him in kisses.... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...in having regained his strength, and begins running and leaping around the hill. Susan and Lucy romp with him. Aslan warns the girls that he is going to roar, and advises... (full context)
Chapter 16: What Happened about the Statues
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
As Susan and Lucy marvel at the statues, Aslan goes around the courtyard breathing on each one. Slowly, the... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
Lucy finds Mr. Tumnus, and Aslan breathes on him and restores him to life; Lucy and... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
...Witch. The Witch herself is fighting Peter with her stone knife. Aslan orders Susan and Lucy off his back; with a roar, he throws himself into battle and pounces upon the... (full context)
Chapter 17: The Hunting of the White Stag
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...outright. Peter, Aslan, and the rest go off to find Edmund, who is “terribly wounded.” Lucy administers some of her magic cordial to Edmund, and then Aslan instructs her to take... (full context)
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Lucy attends to the wounded while Aslan restores those who have been turned to stone. When... (full context)
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
War Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
...a peacemaker and ambassador; Edmund is known for his clearheaded judgement and sense of justice; Lucy is renowned for her valiance and fairness. Many years pass, and soon the siblings remember... (full context)
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
The Wisdom of Children Theme Icon
Lucy foretells that if they pass the post, they will find “strange adventures or else some... (full context)