The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Peter Character Analysis

Peter is Susan, Edmund, and Lucy’s older brother. As the eldest of the four siblings, Peter is in many ways their natural leader. During the journey to Narnia, he proves himself to be brave and heroic, and his physical involvement in many fights and battles marks him as his siblings’ foremost protector. During his reign as High King of Narnia, Peter is well known as a great warrior and leader.

Peter Quotes in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe quotes below are all either spoken by Peter or refer to Peter. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the HarperCollins edition of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe published in 1950.
Chapter 4 Quotes

While he was eating the Queen kept asking him questions. At first Edmund tried to remember that it is rude to speak with one's mouth full, but soon he forgot about this and thought only of trying to shovel down as much Turkish Delight as he could, and the more he ate the more he wanted to eat, and he never asked himself why the Queen should be so inquisitive. She got him to tell her that he had one brother and two sisters, and that one of his sisters had already been in Narnia and had met a Faun there, and that no one except himself and his brother and his sisters knew anything about Narnia. She seemed especially interested in the fact that there were four of them, and kept on coming back to it. “You are sure there are just four of you?” she asked. “Two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve, neither more nor less?” and Edmund, with his mouth full of Turkish Delight, kept on saying, “Yes, I told you that before,” and forgetting to call her “Your Majesty,” but she didn't seem to mind now. At last the Turkish Delight was all finished and Edmund was looking very hard at the empty box and wishing that she would ask him whether he would like some more. Probably the Queen knew quite well what he was thinking; for she knew, though Edmund did not, that this was enchanted Turkish Delight and that anyone who had once tasted it would want more and more of it, and would even, if they were allowed, go on eating it till they killed themselves.

Related Characters: Edmund (speaker), The White Witch / The Queen (speaker), Lucy, Susan, Peter
Page Number: 37
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 5 Quotes

“Peter! Susan! It’s all true. Edmund has seen it too. There is a country you can get to through the wardrobe. Edmund and I both got in. We met one another in there, in the wood. Go on, Edmund; tell them all about it.”

“What's all this about, Ed?” said Peter.

And now we come to one of the nastiest things in this story. Up to that moment Edmund had been feeling sick, and sulky, and annoyed with Lucy for being right, but he hadn't made up his mind what to do. When Peter suddenly asked him the question he decided all at once to do the meanest and most spiteful thing he could think of. He decided to let Lucy down.

“Tell us, Ed,” said Susan.

And Edmund gave a very superior look as if he were far older than Lucy (there was really only a year's difference) and then a little snigger and said, “Oh, yes, Lucy and I have been playing—pretending that all her story about a country in the wardrobe is true. Just for fun, of course. There's nothing there really.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Edmund (speaker), Susan (speaker), Peter (speaker)
Page Number: 44-45
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 6 Quotes

“So you really were here,” [Peter] said, “that time Lu said she'd met you in here—and you made out she was telling lies.”

There was a dead silence. “Well, of all the poisonous little beasts—” said Peter, and shrugged his shoulders and said no more. There seemed, indeed, no more to say, and presently the four resumed their journey; but Edmund was saying to himself. “I'll pay you all out for this, you pack of stuck-up, self-satisfied prigs.”

Related Characters: Peter (speaker), Lucy, Edmund
Page Number: 56
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“I-I wonder if there's any point in going on,” said Susan. “I mean, it doesn't seem particularly safe here and it looks as if it won't be much fun either. And it's getting colder every minute, and we've brought nothing to eat. What about just going home?”

“Oh, but we can't, we can't,” said Lucy suddenly; “don't you see? We can't just go home, not after this. It is all on my account that the poor Faun has got into this trouble. He hid me from the Witch and showed me the way back. That's what it means by comforting the Queen's enemies and fraternizing with Humans. We simply must try to rescue him.”

[…]

“I've a horrid feeling that Lu is right,” said Susan. “I don't want to go a step further and I wish we'd never come. But I think we must try to do something for Mr. Whatever-his-name-is—I mean the Faun.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Susan (speaker), Edmund, Peter, Mr. Tumnus
Page Number: 59-60
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 7 Quotes

“They say Aslan is on the move—perhaps has already landed.”

And now a very curious thing happened. None of the children knew who Aslan was any more than you do; but the moment the Beaver had spoken these words everyone felt quite different. Perhaps it has sometimes happened to you in a dream that someone says something which you don't understand but in the dream it feels as if it had some enormous meaning—either a terrifying one which turns the whole dream into a nightmare or else a lovely meaning too lovely to put into words, which makes the dream so beautiful that you remember it all your life and are always wishing you could get into that dream again. It was like that now. At the name of Aslan each one of the children felt something jump in its inside. Edmund felt a sensation of mysterious horror. Peter felt suddenly brave and adventurous. Susan felt as if some delicious smell or some delightful strain of music had just floated by her. And Lucy got the feeling you have when you wake up in the morning and realize that it is the beginning of the holidays or the beginning of summer.

Related Characters: Mr. Beaver (speaker), Lucy, Edmund, Susan, Peter, Aslan
Page Number: 67-68
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 8 Quotes

“Is he—quite safe? I shall feel rather nervous about meeting a lion.”

“That you will, dearie, and no mistake,” said Mrs. Beaver; “if there's anyone who can appear before Aslan without their knees knocking, they're either braver than most or else just silly.”

“Then he isn't safe?” said Lucy.

"Safe?” said Mr. Beaver; “don't you hear what Mrs. Beaver tells you? Who said anything about safe? 'Course he isn't safe. But he's good. He's the King, I tell you.”

“I'm longing to see him,” said Peter, “even if I do feel frightened when it comes to the point.”

[…]

“The quickest way you can help [Mr. Tumnus] is by going to meet Aslan,” said Mr. Beaver, “once he's with us, then we can begin doing things. Not that we don't need you too. For that's another of the old rhymes:

When Adam's flesh and Adam's bone Sits at Cair Paravel in throne,

The evil time will be over and done.

So things must be drawing near their end now he's come and you've come.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Susan (speaker), Peter (speaker), Mr. Beaver (speaker), Mrs. Beaver (speaker), Aslan, Mr. Tumnus
Page Number: 80-81
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 9 Quotes

You mustn't think that even now Edmund was quite so bad that he actually wanted his brother and sisters to be turned into stone. He did want Turkish Delight and to be a Prince (and later a King) and to pay Peter out for calling him a beast. As for what the Witch would do with the others, he didn't want her to be particularly nice to them—certainly not to put them on the same level as himself; but he managed to believe, or to pretend he believed, that she wouldn't do anything very bad to them, “Because,” he said to himself, “all these people who say nasty things about her are her enemies and probably half of it isn't true. She was jolly nice to me, anyway, much nicer than they are. I expect she is the rightful Queen really. Anyway, she'll be better than that awful Aslan!” At least, that was the excuse he made in his own mind for what he was doing. It wasn't a very good excuse, however, for deep down inside him he really knew that the White Witch was bad and cruel.

Related Characters: Edmund (speaker), Lucy, Susan, Peter, Aslan, The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 10 Quotes

“Come on!” cried Mr. Beaver, who was almost dancing with delight. “Come and see! This is a nasty knock for the Witch! It looks as if her power is already crumbling.”

[…]

It was a sledge, and it was reindeer with bells on their harness. […] And on the sledge sat a person whom everyone knew the moment they set eyes on him. He was a huge man in a bright red robe (bright as hollyberries) with a hood that had fur inside it and a great white beard that fell like a foamy waterfall over his chest. Everyone knew him because, though you see people of his sort only in Narnia, you see pictures of them and hear them talked about even in our world—the world on this side of the wardrobe door. But when you really see them in Narnia it is rather different. Some of the pictures of Father Christmas in our world make him look only funny and jolly. But now that the children actually stood looking at him they didn't find it quite like that. He was so big, and so glad, and so real, that they all became quite still. They felt very glad, but also solemn.

“I've come at last,” said he. “She has kept me out for a long time, but I have got in at last. Aslan is on the move. The Witch's magic is weakening.”

Related Characters: Mr. Beaver (speaker), Lucy, Susan, Peter, The White Witch / The Queen, Mrs. Beaver
Related Symbols: Father Christmas
Page Number: 106-107
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 12 Quotes

But as for Aslan himself, the Beavers and the children didn't know what to do or say when they saw him. People who have not been in Narnia sometimes think that a thing cannot be good and terrible at the same time. If the children had ever thought so, they were cured of it now. For when they tried to look at Aslan's face they just caught a glimpse of the golden mane and the great, royal, solemn, overwhelming eyes; and then they found they couldn't look at him and went all trembly.

Related Characters: Lucy, Susan, Peter, Aslan, Mr. Beaver, Mrs. Beaver
Page Number: 126
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 17 Quotes

“It was all Edmund's doing, Aslan,” Peter was saying. “We'd have been beaten if it hadn't been for him. The Witch was turning our troops into stone right and left. But nothing would stop him. He fought his way through three ogres to where she was just turning one of your leopards into a statue. And when he reached her he had sense to bring his sword smashing down on her wand in- stead of trying to go for her directly and simply getting made a statue himself for his pains. That was the mistake all the rest were making. Once her wand was broken we began to have some chance—if we hadn't lost so many already. He was terribly wounded. We must go and see him.”

Related Characters: Peter (speaker), Edmund, Aslan, The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 178-179
Explanation and Analysis:
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“I know not how it is, but this lamp on the post worketh upon me strangely. It runs in my mind that I have seen the like before; as it were in a dream, or in the dream of a dream.”

“Sir,” answered they all, “it is even so with us also.”

“And more,” said Queen Lucy, “for it will not go out of my mind that if we pass this post and lantern either we shall find strange adventures or else some great change of our fortunes.”

“Madam,” said King Edmund, “the like foreboding stirreth in my heart also.”

“And in mine, fair brother,” said King Peter.

“And in mine too,” said Queen Susan. “Wherefore by my counsel we shall lightly return to our horses and follow this White Stag no further.”

“Madam,” said King Peter, “therein I pray thee to have me excused. For never since we four were Kings and Queens in Narnia have we set our hands to any high matter, as battles, quests, feats of arms, acts of justice, and the like, and then given over; but always what we have taken in hand, the same we have achieved.”

“Sister,” said Queen Lucy, “my royal brother speaks rightly. And it seems to me we should be shamed if for any fearing or foreboding we turned back from following so noble a beast as now we have in chase.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Edmund (speaker), Susan (speaker), Peter (speaker)
Page Number: 186-187
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Professor, who was a very remarkable man, didn't tell them not to be silly or not to tell lies, but believed the whole story. “No,” he said, “I don't think it will be any good trying to go back through the wardrobe door to get the coats. You won't get into Narnia again by that route. Nor would the coats be much use by now if you did! Eh? What's that? Yes, of course you'll get back to Narnia again someday. Once a King in Narnia, always a King in Narnia. But don't go trying to use the same route twice. Indeed, don't try to get there at all. It'll happen when you're not looking for it. And don't talk too much about it even among yourselves. And don't mention it to anyone else unless you find that they've had adventures of the same sort themselves. What's that? How will you know? Oh, you'll know all right. Odd things they say—even their looks—will let the secret out. Keep your eyes open.”

Related Characters: The Professor (speaker), Lucy, Edmund, Susan, Peter
Page Number: 188-189
Explanation and Analysis:
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Peter Character Timeline in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The timeline below shows where the character Peter appears in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Lucy Looks into a Wardrobe
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Siblings Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy have been sent away from London to the countryside because of... (full context)
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...is raining. Edmund grumbles about the bad weather, but Susan urges him to cheer up; Peter offers to take Edmund and the others exploring inside of the massive house rather than... (full context)
Chapter 3: Edmund and the Wardrobe
Fantasy, Reality, and Escapism Theme Icon
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...the wardrobe for her siblings, however, they find that it is an ordinary piece of furniture—Peter climbs into it and raps his knuckles against the back of the wardrobe, proving that... (full context)
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...lie—she is a “very truthful girl” and knows in her heart that she is right. Peter and Susan tease her lightly about Narnia, but Edmund, who is spiteful and cruel, teases... (full context)
Chapter 5: Back on This Side of the Door
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...the others that Narnia is real, and that Edmund has been there now, too. When Peter asks Edmund if Lucy is telling the truth, Edmund decides “to do the meanest and... (full context)
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Peter reprimands Edmund for being “beastly” to Lucy and setting her off. Edmund protests that Lucy... (full context)
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...she is telling the truth about Narnia, and now wishes she had stayed there forever. Peter and Susan are concerned for Lucy, and wonder if she is slightly losing her mind.... (full context)
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The Professor listens thoughtfully to Peter and Susan’s story, and then asks them how they know that Lucy isn’t telling the... (full context)
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Susan and Peter are shocked to see that the Professor is serious, but he presses on, encouraging them... (full context)
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After their conversation with the Professor, Peter and Susan try hard to make things better for Lucy. Peter gets Edmund to stop... (full context)
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...during these tours, and to make themselves scarce while they are going on. One morning, Peter and Edmund are playing near a suit of armor when Lucy and Susan rush into... (full context)
Chapter 6: Into the Forest
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...leave. After a while, they begin to smell camphor and feel a chill in the air—Peter complains that he is sitting on something wet, and Susan sees a light in the... (full context)
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...the left, hoping to point his siblings in the direction of the Queen’s home. When Peter realizes that Edmund has been to Narnia before after all, he calls him a “poisonous... (full context)
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Peter suggests Lucy act as the leader, since she is the most familiar with Narnia. Lucy... (full context)
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Susan and Peter are frightened, and ask Lucy to explain what’s going on. She tells them that the... (full context)
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...way leads the children through the woods. As they follow it, Edmund worries aloud to Peter that the robin is leading them into trouble. Peter says he’s sure the Robin wouldn’t... (full context)
Chapter 7: A Day with the Beavers
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...looks around fearfully, tells the children to “Hush,” and then retreats back into the trees. Peter says he thinks the creature is a beaver. The children debate whether they should follow... (full context)
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...beaver asks them if they are “the Sons of Adam and the Daughters of Eve.” Peter confirms that they are, and asks who the beaver is so afraid of. The beaver... (full context)
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...know who he is, the children all feel “quite different.” Edmund feels a mysterious horror; Peter feels full of bravery; Susan feels as if she has just smelled something delicious or... (full context)
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...boils potatoes and sets the table with Lucy and Susan’s help, while Mr. Beaver and Peter go out to catch some fish for dinner. The whole group then sits around the... (full context)
Chapter 9: In the Witch’s House
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...to one day be a Prince, or even a King. He also wants to pay Peter back for being mean to him and calling him a beast. Edmund believes that if... (full context)
Chapter 10: The Spell Begins to Break
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Back at the Mr. Beaver and Mrs. Beaver’s house, Peter, Susan, and Lucy hurriedly gather food and supplies for the journey. They want to leave... (full context)
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...children and presents them with their presents, which are tools, he says, not toys. For Peter, he has a shield and a sword; for Susan, a bow and a quiver of... (full context)
Chapter 12: Peter’s First Battle
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Miles away, the Mr. Beaver, Mrs. Beaver, Peter, Lucy, and Susan are still making their way to the Stone Table; they, too, are... (full context)
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At last, the group reaches the clearing where the Stone Table is. Peter, Susan, and Lucy take in the sight of the landmark—it is a huge slab of... (full context)
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Peter bravely approaches Aslan, and Aslan greets Peter, Susan, Lucy, Mr. Beaver and Mrs. Beaver warmly.... (full context)
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While Lucy and Susan are whisked away to be prepared for dinner, Aslan brings Peter to a high ridge where he can see the country he will soon rule. Aslan... (full context)
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...Stone Table, and members of Aslan’s army are scattered in every direction. Lucy runs towards Peter with fear; Susan is being chased up a tree by Maugrim. Peter draws his sword,... (full context)
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First, though, Aslan beckons Peter to him. He instructs Peter to wipe his sword clean of the wolf’s blood. Once... (full context)
Chapter 13: Deep Magic from the Dawn of Time
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In the morning, Peter, Susan, and Lucy awake to the news that Edmund has been brought back to camp... (full context)
Chapter 14: The Triumph of the Witch
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...and packing up, and by the afternoon, they are on the march northeast. Aslan warns Peter that after the Witch has “finished her business” at the table, she will return to... (full context)
Chapter 16: What Happened about the Statues
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Eventually, Aslan and his followers come upon Peter, Edmund, and the rest of their army in a direct clash with the Witch and... (full context)
Chapter 17: The Hunting of the White Stag
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...see that the Witch has died, they either give themselves up or flee the battle. Peter and Aslan shake hands, and Peter tells Aslan that their victory is owed to Edmund,... (full context)
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...the peace, make alliances with countries beyond the sea, and grow into respected, dignified rulers. Peter is known as a great warrior; Susan is a peacemaker and ambassador; Edmund is known... (full context)
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...Stag hunt, and follow the beast into a deep thicket that their horses cannot pass. Peter suggests they all alight from their horses and go forward on foot. Before long, they... (full context)