The Lowland

The Lowland

by

Jhumpa Lahiri

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Udayan Mitra Character Analysis

Subhash’s younger brother Udayan is a rascal, a radical, and in many ways a secondary antagonist of the novel—despite the fact that he dies early on and exists only in the collective consciousness of those who knew him for much of the book. Despite being younger than Subhash, Udayan is the more dominant one in their relationship; his fiery personality and taste for adventure often land him and Subhash in trouble. As the boys grow older, Udayan becomes involved in radical politics through his affiliation with the Communist Party of India (Marxist-Leninist), a splinter group of the Communist Party of India with ties to the violent peasant uprising in Naxalbari. Udayan’s devotion to revolutionary politics and interest in controversial figures such as Mao, Fidel Castro, and Che Guevara alienate him from his quiet, studious brother, even as Subhash envies Udayan for his outspoken and intrepid nature. When Subhash announces his intention to continue his studies in the United States, Udayan begs his brother not to go, but Subhash’s mind is already made up. When news comes years later that Udayan has died due to his involvement in the violent Naxalite terrorist movement, Udayan ceases to be a character in the book in the traditional sense—but Subhash, Udayan’s widow Gauri, and Subhash and Udayan’s mother Bijoli all spend the rest of the novel struggling with the ways Udayan’s spirit haunts them and informs their actions even from beyond the grave.

Udayan Mitra Quotes in The Lowland

The The Lowland quotes below are all either spoken by Udayan Mitra or refer to Udayan Mitra. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Political and Personal Violence Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Vintage edition of The Lowland published in 2014.
Part 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

Should I stand guard on this side while you explore? Subhash asked him.

What fun would that be?

What do you see?

Come see for yourself.

Subhash nudged the kerosene tin closer to the wall. He stepped onto it, feeling the hollow structure wobble beneath him.

Let's go, Subhash.

Udayan readjusted himself, dropping down so that only his fingertips were visible. Then he released his hands and fell. Subhash could hear him breathing hard from the effort.

You're all right?

Of course. Now you.

Subhash gripped the wall with his hands, hugging it to his chest, scraping his knees. As usual he was uncertain whether he was more frustrated by Udayan's daring, or with himself for his lack of it. Subhash was thirteen, older by fifteen months. But he had no sense of himself without Udayan. From his earliest memories, at every point, his brother was there.

Related Characters: Subhash Mitra (speaker), Udayan Mitra (speaker)
Related Symbols: Udayan’s Footprints
Page Number: 6-7
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1, Chapter 3 Quotes

In the courtyard of their family's house was the most enduring legacy of Udayan s transgressions. A trail of his footprints, created the day the dirt surface was paved. A day they'd been instructed to remain indoors until it had set. […] Subhash had listened. He had watched through the window he had not gone out. But when their mother's back was turned, Udayan ran down the long wooden plank temporarily set up to get from the door to the street. Halfway across the plank he lost his balance, the evidence of his path forming impressions of the soles of his feet, tapering like an hourglass at the center, the pads of the toes disconnected.

The following day the mason was called back. By then the surface had dried, and the impressions left by Udayan's feet were permanent. The only way to repair the flaw was to apply another layer. Subhash wondered whether this time his brother had gone too far. But to the mason their father said, Leave it be. Not for the expense or effort involved, but because he believed it was wrong to erase steps that his son had taken. And so the imperfection became a mark of distinction about their home. Something visitors noticed, the first family anecdote that was told.

Related Characters: Subhash Mitra (speaker), Udayan Mitra
Related Symbols: Udayan’s Footprints
Page Number: 13-14
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1, Chapter 4 Quotes

Now if they happened to pass the Tolly Club together on their way to or from the tram depot, Udayan called it an affront. People still filled slums all over the city, children were born and raised on the streets. Why were a hundred acres walled off for the enjoyment of a few? Subhash remembered the imported trees, the jackals, the bird cries. The golf balls heavy in their pockets, the undulating green of the course. He remembered Udayan going over the wall first, challenging him to follow. Crouching on the ground the last evening they were there, trying to shield him. But Udayan said that golf was the pastime of the comprador bourgeoisie. He said the Tolly Club was proof that India was still a semicolonial country behaving as if the British had never left. He pointed out that Che, who had worked as a caddy on a golf course in Argentina, had come to the same conclusion. That after the Cuban revolution getting rid of the golf courses was one of the first things Castro had done.

Related Characters: Subhash Mitra (speaker), Udayan Mitra
Page Number: 29-30
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1, Chapter 5 Quotes

Subhash remembered climbing over the wall of the Tolly Club. This time, Subhash wasn’t afraid of being caught. Perhaps it was foolish of him, but something told him that such a thing could happen only once. And he was right, no one noticed what they did, no one punished them for it, and a few minutes later they were crossing the bridge again, quickly, smoking cigarettes to calm themselves down.

This time it was only Udayan who was giddy. Only Udayan who was proud of what they'd done. Subhash was angry with himself for going along with it. For still needing to prove he could. He was sick of the fear that always rose up in him: that he would cease to exist, and that he and Udayan would cease to be brothers, were Subhash to resist him.

Related Characters: Subhash Mitra (speaker), Udayan Mitra
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3, Chapter 3 Quotes

Like the solution to an equation emerging bit by bit, Subhash began to perceive a turn things might take. He was already eager to leave Calcutta. There was nothing he could do for his parents. He was unable to console them. Though he'd returned to stand before them, in the end it had not mattered that he had come. But Gauri was different. Around her, he felt a shared awareness of the person they'd both loved. He thought of her remaining with his parents, living by their rules. His mother's coldness toward Gauri was insulting, but his father's passivity was just as cruel. And it wasn't simply cruelty. Their treatment of Gauri was deliberate, intended to drive her out. He thought of her becoming a mother, only to lose control of the child. He thought of the child being raised in a joyless house.

The only way to prevent it was to take Gauri away. It was all he could do to help her, the only alternative he could provide. And the only way to take her away was to marry her. To take his brother's place, to raise his child, to come to love Gauri as Udayan had. To follow him in a way that felt perverse, that felt ordained. That felt both right and wrong.

Related Characters: Subhash Mitra (speaker), Gauri Mitra, Udayan Mitra, Bijoli Mitra
Related Symbols: Udayan’s Footprints
Page Number: 138
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4, Chapter 5 Quotes

Every night, at Bela's insistence, he lay with her until she fell asleep. It was a reminder of their connection to each other, a connection at once false and true. And so night after night, after helping her brush her teeth and changing her into her pajamas, he switched off the light and lay beside her. […] Some nights he, too, fell asleep briefly beside Bela. Carefully he removed her hands from the collar of his shirt, and adjusted the blanket on top of her. Her head was thrust back on the pillow, in a combined posture of pride and surrender. He'd experienced such closeness with only one other person. With Udayan. Each night, extracting himself from her, for a moment his heart stopped, wondering what she would say, the day she learned the truth about him.

Related Characters: Subhash Mitra (speaker), Bela Mitra , Udayan Mitra
Page Number: 186-187
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4, Chapter 6 Quotes

[Gauri] was failing at something every other woman on earth did without trying. That should not have proved a struggle. Even her own mother, who had not fully raised her, had loved her; of that there had been no doubt. But Gauri feared she had already descended to a place where it was no longer possible to swim up to Bela, to hold on to her.

Nor was her love for Udayan recognizable or intact. Anger was always mounted to it, zigzagging through her like some helplessly mating pair of insects. Anger at him for dying when he might have lived. For bringing her happiness, and then taking it away. For trusting her, only to betray her. For believing in sacrifice, only to be so selfish in the end.

She no longer searched for signs of him. The fleeting awareness that he might be in a room, looking over her shoulder as she worked at her desk, was no longer a comfort. Certain days it was possible not to think of him, to remember him. No aspect of him had traveled to America. Apart from Bela, he'd refused to join her here.

Related Characters: Gauri Mitra (speaker), Bela Mitra , Udayan Mitra
Page Number: 197
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 5, Chapter 1 Quotes

She carries a large shallow basket meant to store extra coal. She walks over to the lowland, hoisting up her sari so that her calves are revealed, speckled like some egg-shells with a fine brown spray. She wades into a puddle and bends over, stirring things around with a stick. Then, using her hands, she starts picking items out of the murky green water. A little bit, a few minutes each day; this is her plan, to keep the area by Udayan’s stone uncluttered.

She piles refuse into the basket, empties the basket a little ways off, and then begins to fill it again. With bare hands she sorts through the empty bottles of Dettol, Sunsilk shampoo. Things rats don't eat, that crows don’t bother to carry away. Cigarette packets tossed in by passing strangers. A bloodied sanitary pad.

She knows she will never remove it all. But each day she goes out and fills up her basket, once, then a few times more. She does not care when some people tell her, when they stop to notice what she’s doing, that it is pointless. That it is disgusting and beneath her dignity. That it could cause her to contract some sort of disease. She's used to neighbors not knowing what to make of her. She's used to ignoring them.

Related Characters: Bijoli Mitra (speaker), Udayan Mitra
Related Symbols: The Lowland
Page Number: 228
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 7, Chapter 5 Quotes

I’ve known for years about Udayan, she went on. I know who I am.

Now it was Gauri unable to move, unable to speak. Unable to reconcile hearing Udayan's name, coming from Bela.

And it doesn't matter. Nothing excuses what you did, Bela said.

Bela's words were like bullets. Putting an end to Udayan, silencing Gauri now.

Nothing will ever excuse it. You're not my mother. You're nothing. Can you hear me? I want you to nod if you can hear me.

There was nothing inside her. Was this what Udayan felt, in the lowland when he stood to face them, as the whole neighborhood watched? There was no one to witness what was happening now Somehow, she nodded her head.

You're as dead to me as he is. The only difference is that you left me by choice.

She was right; there was nothing to clarify, nothing more to convey.

Related Characters: Bela Mitra (speaker), Gauri Mitra, Udayan Mitra
Related Symbols: The Lowland
Page Number: 383
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 7, Chapter 6 Quotes

The courtyard no longer existed. […] She walked past the house, across the lane, and over toward the two ponds. She had forgotten no detail. The color and shape of the ponds clear in her mind. But the details were no longer there. Both ponds were gone. New homes filled up an area that had once been watery open.

Walking a bit farther, she saw that the lowland was also gone. That sparsely populated tract was now indistinguishable from the rest of the neighborhood, and on it more homes had been built. Scooters parked in front of doorways, laundry hung out to dry.

She wondered if any of the people she passed remembered things as she did. […] Somewhere close to where she stood, Udayan had hidden in the water. He'd been taken to an empty field. Somewhere there was a tablet with his name on it, commemorating the brief life he'd led. Or perhaps this, too, had been removed. She was unprepared for the landscape to be so altered. For there to be no trace of that evening, forty autumns ago. […] Again she remembered what Bela had said to her. That her reappearance meant nothing. That she was as dead as Udayan.

Standing there, unable to find him, she felt a new solidarity with him. The bond of not existing.

Related Characters: Gauri Mitra (speaker), Udayan Mitra
Page Number: 391
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Lowland LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Lowland PDF

Udayan Mitra Character Timeline in The Lowland

The timeline below shows where the character Udayan Mitra appears in The Lowland. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 1
Political and Personal Violence Theme Icon
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...off, and once again the damp, marshy ground would become exposed. Two brothers, Subhash and Udayan, have walked across the lowland uncountable times, using it as a shortcut to the field... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 2
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Subhash and Udayan have never set foot in the Tolly Club, a local golf and country club, though... (full context)
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...have been lost or damaged on the golf course for a cheap price, allowing Subhash, Udayan, and other boys like them who are barred from the Club to play golf on... (full context)
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One evening, Subhash and Udayan decide to try to infiltrate the club. Around dusk, they approach the wall with their... (full context)
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Subhash and Udayan arrive at the walls of the Club and find a place where the fence is... (full context)
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...return many times, and on each visit Subhash collects feathers, almonds, and bird eggs while Udayan practices his swing. (full context)
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...also takes their putting iron. The policeman tells the boys that they should know better. Udayan insists the break-in was his idea, and the policeman tells Subhash he has a “loyal... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3
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...believe “he lives in his own world,” and yet he is always in plain sight; Udayan, on the other hand, is always disappearing, playing games in which he hides and then... (full context)
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...and the boys had been told to stay off the fresh cement for twenty-four hours, Udayan had broken the rules and run through the wet pavement, leaving his footprints behind. Rather... (full context)
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In their classes, Subhash and Udayan learn that Tollygunge was built on reclaimed land. It was once a dense swamp, which... (full context)
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Udayan becomes obsessed with circuitry and electronics, and installs a buzzer at the front door of... (full context)
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The boys grow older and are admitted to two of the city’s best colleges: Udayan to Presidency to study physics, and Subhash to Jadavpur to study chemical engineering. They are... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 4
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Subhash and Udayan often stay up late, listening to the radio and discussing what is happening in Naxalbari.... (full context)
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...worsens, and there are demonstrations in support of the Naxalbari peasants at both Subhash and Udayan’s colleges. The West Bengal government authorizes a raid of Naxalbari peasants’ houses, and many insurgents... (full context)
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...and Majumdar have gone into hiding. Indian journalists are reprinting articles from Chinese Communist magazines. Udayan shows the articles to his father, who dismisses their rhetoric. He has already lived through... (full context)
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Subhash begins finding communist texts, including Mao’s Little Red Book, among Udayan’s things. One afternoon, on a study break, Subhash picks up a book of essays by... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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Despite this climate, Udayan and Subhash both begin their postgraduate studies. Subhash continues on at Jadavpur, while Udayan transfers... (full context)
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One evening, Udayan invites Subhash to a meeting in North Calcutta. In the small room, students are gathered... (full context)
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...written a list of slogans glorifying Mao and the uprising in Naxalbari. One night, when Udayan comes home late, Subhash asks if he has been out painting slogans. Udayan replies that... (full context)
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The next night, Subhash again finds himself in the position of lookout as Udayan paints the slogan “Long live Naxalbari” in English on a wall. Subhash is not afraid... (full context)
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After finishing school, Udayan finds a job teaching science at a high school near Tollygunge, while Subhash applies to... (full context)
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It is Udayan, however, who goes away before Subhash, claiming he is traveling with friends. A month later,... (full context)
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...behind. He knows that his brother was at the rally and feels slightly sad that Udayan did not invite him to come along. Subhash feels as if the two of them... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 6
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...nothing like the explosive ones in Calcutta; even so, he thinks of how his brother Udayan would ridicule him for not taking part in it. Subhash reminds himself that he is... (full context)
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...proud to be on his own in America—it is a step he has taken which Udayan will never take. He is alone in this strange, coastal landscape. (full context)
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One afternoon in November, Subhash receives a letter from Udayan. Udayan excitedly describes meeting Kanu Sanyal. He also reveals that their parents are adding onto... (full context)
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New Year’s Eve comes and goes, and a new letter from Udayan arrives—along with a black-and-white photograph of a young woman. Udayan’s letter informs Subhash that he... (full context)
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...concerned for his brother, who, at only 24, cannot possibly support a family. He feels Udayan has made an impulsive decision, disrespectful of their parents, and is surprised that for as... (full context)
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...he will meet Gauri, and what he will think of her. He feels “defeated by Udayan all over again, for having found a girl like that.” (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 1
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Whenever Udayan is at Gauri’s house, studying and discussing communism with her brother Manash, Gauri stays on... (full context)
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Gauri and Udayan’s universities are next to one another, and Gauri often finds herself looking for him. Even... (full context)
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Udayan notices that Gauri is reading Descartes and asks her about her studies in philosophy. Gauri... (full context)
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As Gauri tells Udayan her story, she realizes he is fascinated by the amount of autonomy she has had... (full context)
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Gauri and Udayan run into each other all the time, and frequently meet at one another’s campuses. Udayan... (full context)
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As Gauri and Udayan grow closer, Udayan is often pulled away because he suddenly has to be at a... (full context)
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One day, Gauri discovers a note in one of the books Udayan has lent her, asking her to meet him at a matinee at a cinema. The... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2
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Udayan’s letters no longer mention Naxalbari or any kind of politics. He asks repeatedly, though, when... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 3
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Subhash wishes he could tell Udayan about the “profound step [he has] taken” in embarking upon an affair with Holly, but... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 4
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...The two go bicycling, and Subhash is reminded of learning to ride a bike with Udayan in Calcutta. He thinks of a letter he recently received from his brother, which tells... (full context)
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...connection to one another out of harm’s way.” In his hurt and anger, Subhash takes Udayan’s most recent letter from his pocket, rips it up, and drops the pieces into the... (full context)
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...to mark the holiday—this year, only a telegram arrives. It consists of only two sentences: “Udayan killed. Come back if you can.” (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1
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...was renewed in order to attempt to stop the Naxalites. Subhash begins to realize that Udayan was, more than likely, killed by the police. (full context)
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...Subhash takes a walk over to the lowland. He sees a small stone marker bearing Udayan’s name, and the years of his birth and death. Subhash remembers twisting his ankle at... (full context)
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...Subhash refuses. Upon hearing Subhash speak, Gauri remarks that Subhash has the same voice as Udayan. (full context)
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...withdrawn. Each evening, Bijoli gathers flowers from the courtyard and goes to the lowland, rinsing Udayan’s marker clean and laying flowers at its base. Subhash realizes that Udayan must have been... (full context)
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Subhash’s parents refuses to tell him how Udayan was killed. Subhash later approaches Gauri, giving her a book Udayan had asked him to... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 2
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The narrative flashes back to the night of Udayan’s death. It is the week before Durga Pujo in Calcutta, and Bijoli and Gauri have... (full context)
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...the women are not allowed to go into the house. Policemen bring Gauri, Bijoli, and Udayan’s father out of the courtyard and towards the flooded lowland at gunpoint. At the lowland,... (full context)
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...with the megaphone announces that he will begin shooting members of the Mitra family if Udayan does not reveal himself. Moments later, Gauri can hear something emerging from the flooded lowland—it... (full context)
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After Udayan begs his parents’ forgiveness, he meets Gauri’s eyes for just a second, and then is... (full context)
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The police, Gauri learns, had discovered a diary under her and Udayan’s mattress when they entered the house to search for him. It contained instructions for how... (full context)
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Udayan’s body is not returned to the Mitras, and they are not told where it has... (full context)
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About a month after Udayan’s death, Gauri begins feeling faint and ill. Bijoli, realizing what is going on, informs Gauri... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 3
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The day after hearing Gauri’s story of Udayan’s death, Subhash goes out into the city to the tailor to have new clothes made,... (full context)
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...her studies. Subhash begs his parents to accept Gauri and treat her with respect, for Udayan’s sake, but his mother angrily warns him not to tell her how to mourn her... (full context)
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That night, Subhash cannot sleep. He thinks about how Udayan’s death was in vain—dedicated to a movement that has caused only destruction, and which has... (full context)
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...house and ask to speak to Gauri. They ask her if she is sympathetic to Udayan’s beliefs, and whether she is a current member of any political organization. She says she... (full context)
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...no one there will bother her. Subhash tells her that he knows she still loves Udayan and does not expect love from her. He urges her to understand, though, that if... (full context)
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...morning, Gauri tells Subhash that he does not have to shoulder the burden of marrying her—Udayan would not have wanted “this.” Subhash says he understands, but Gauri reveals that Udayan did... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 1
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...to find Subhash waiting for her. She is struck by how similar he looks to Udayan, but thinks he is a “milder version” of her husband with “weakness” in his eyes.... (full context)
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...marriage was a bad choice—she was marrying Subhash as a means of staying connected to Udayan, but knew even as she was going through with it that it was as useless... (full context)
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...declines. Gauri settles into a quiet, easy routine with Subhash, whose comings and goings, unlike Udayan’s, are predictable and regular. When the two of them watch the news in the evening,... (full context)
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...of her gratitude to Subhash, or tell him that he is a better man than Udayan, but she cannot. She looks at their footprints in the sand and sees that, unlike... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 2
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...knows it is too soon. He cannot deny, though, that just as he as inherited Udayan’s wife and child, he has inherited a need for Gauri physically. (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 4
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...She has, deliberately or otherwise, forgotten the things she saw from the terrace the night Udayan was killed, and believes it is because she physically removed herself from Tollygunge that she... (full context)
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...prison; Charu Majumdar died in police custody the same summer Bela was born. Many of Udayan’s comrades are still being tortured in prison. Though the Naxalite movement has attracted the attention... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 5
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...briefly beside his daughter—he has experienced this kind of closeness with only one other person: Udayan. Every night, when he leaves Bela’s room, he wonders what will happen when she learns... (full context)
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...that she is unhappy; that the smiling, carefree girl he saw in the first picture Udayan sent, all those years ago, is gone forever. (full context)
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...something Bijoli said when he first told her of his plans to marry Gauri: “She’s Udayan’s wife, she’ll never love you.” At the time, Subhash had argued with his mother, convinced... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 6
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...She continues sleeping with Subhash in spite of these feelings, attempting each time to “extinguish Udayan’s ghost” and “smother what haunt[s] her.” Through their exuberant but emotionless lovemaking, she learns that... (full context)
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...[does] without trying,” and only feels more lost when she considers that her love for Udayan—the impetus for her agreeing to marry Subhash and bring Udayan’s child into the world with... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 7
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...in bed, Gauri approaches Subhash and tells him that she wants to tell Bela about Udayan. Subhash protests that Bela, at six years old, is too young—to tell her now would... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 1
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...Tollygunge has grown dirty and unrecognizable, no longer the quiet, clean neighborhood of Subhash and Udayan’s youth. (full context)
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Each day, at the hour of Udayan’s death, Bijoli gathers flowers and walks to the edge of the lowland. An old woman... (full context)
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...terrace. When Bijoli realizes that Deepa has replaced everyone in her family, she wonders whether Udayan somehow “arranged” for this to happen. As a boy, Udayan spent time with the people... (full context)
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Bijoli feels her home has been “forsaken”—Udayan has not lived to inherit it, and Subhash has left the country. His departure has... (full context)
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...her and passes the time. One day, remnants of a marriage celebration are piled around Udayan’s marker. The mass of garlands and fruit repels Bijoli, and she refuses to touch it.... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 2
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...picture in Bijoli’s room. Subhash explains that the picture is not of him—it is of Udayan, who died years ago of an “illness.” When Bela tells Subhash that Bijoli often says... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 4
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...not to dirty his shoes playing in the lowland or stay out too late with Udayan and their friends. Subhash laments that he does not exist in his mother’s mind anymore.... (full context)
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...taken. He admires her resilience in the face of Gauri’s abandonment. Sometimes, Subhash worries about Udayan’s influence on Bela—though it is irrational, he fears that Udayan has, in a way, returned,... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 1
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Gauri has a dream—or a nightmare—of sitting in her and Udayan’s bedroom in Tollygunge with Udayan. In the dream, Udayan tells Gauri that Sinha has been... (full context)
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Gauri knows that what she has done to Bela is “a crime worse than anything Udayan had committed,” and can never be undone. She hopes that Subhash has found happiness—she is... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 2
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...being alive.” He is assaulted by memories of his childhood and cannot stop thinking of Udayan. He realizes that what is disturbing him so deeply that he is “still too weak... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 4
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...berates Subhash for having lied to her for so many years. She asks questions about Udayan—about his involvement with the Naxalites, about whether he knew she was going to be born.... (full context)
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...she and Subhash begin to repair their relationship. Bela thanks Subhash for telling her about Udayan and tells him that knowing this piece of her own personal history helps her to... (full context)
Part 7, Chapter 1
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...learned that he’s still working at the same lab in Rhode Island. She has googled Udayan and Bela, too, but neither of them have left a footprint on the internet. Gauri... (full context)
Part 7, Chapter 2
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Gauri remembers the early days of 1970—the time of her marriage to Udayan, or, rather, of their elopement. They were married in the countryside, in the presence of... (full context)
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Gauri and Udayan return to the home of Udayan’s parents, where Gauri paints the part of her hair... (full context)
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At first, Gauri and Udayan share a normal life, going on evening walks together and settling into his parents’ house.... (full context)
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Shortly after their first wedding anniversary, Udayan arranges a tutoring job for Gauri. She is to help a brother and sister in... (full context)
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...bringing his son home from school each Thursday afternoon, Gauri confirms the policeman’s schedule with Udayan, who asks how old the son is, and then turns away from Gauri. (full context)
Part 7, Chapter 3
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...stayed with just one person or in just one place. She tells Drew, too, about Udayan, and the truth of her parentage. Drew listens intently and promises Bela that he isn’t... (full context)
Part 7, Chapter 4
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...feels “yoked to him” and “in unspoken collusion with him”—he is her only link to Udayan. (full context)
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...path, and rings the doorbell, excited deep down to at last see “a version of Udayan as an old man.” (full context)
Part 7, Chapter 5
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...she cannot stand the sight of her. She informs Gauri that she knows all about Udayan, but that the truth of her parentage does not excuse what Gauri did—nothing could. Bela... (full context)
Part 7, Chapter 6
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...until she comes to the house in which she once believed she’d grow old with Udayan. The house has been renovated, and the courtyard with Udayan’s footprints in it no longer... (full context)
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Gauri shamefully recalls her involvement in Nirmal Dey’s death—the death which marked Udayan as a target. No one knows what Gauri has done—she is “the sole guardian of... (full context)
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Back at the guesthouse, Gauri has a dream of Udayan—she remembers, in sleep, the night before the police came for him. Udayan had told Gauri... (full context)
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...betrayal of Bela, her part in the conspiracy against Nirmal Dey, her first meeting with Udayan. Gauri shuts her eyes, recalling the thrill of loving Udayan, the pain of losing him,... (full context)
Part 8, Chapter 1
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...“another stone in a distant country”—the tablet at the edge of the lowland which bears Udayan’s name. (full context)
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Subhash feels Udayan beside him and remembers walking together across the lowland toward the Tolly Club, golf balls... (full context)
Part 8, Chapter 2
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The narrative flashes back to the evening Udayan was killed. When the police vans approach his house, he sees them coming—he is on... (full context)
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Udayan runs quickly through the yard out back towards the lowland and enters the flooded pool... (full context)
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Underwater, Udayan feels a strange freedom—the freedom of not having to struggle to listen to anything. Since... (full context)
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Udayan mourns the fact that he has never been to China or Cuba and hears the... (full context)
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Udayan’s body overcomes his mind and he surfaces involuntarily, gasping and choking. Two paramilitary officers have... (full context)
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Udayan remembers how his involvement with the Naxalites began. He and his fellow students lamented their... (full context)
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After the strike at school, Udayan went to the countryside to “further indoctrinate himself.” He met desperate farmers, starving peasants, and... (full context)
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...CPI(M-L) formed. Subhash left for America, disapproving of the party’s objectives. His brother’s disdain filled Udayan with a “foreboding” feeling that the two would never meet again, but he shook it... (full context)
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Udayan was not the one to stab Nirmal Dey in an alleyway, but he was the... (full context)
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At the edge of the lowland, Udayan listens as his parents plead with the police, professing their son’s innocence, having no knowledge... (full context)
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The police put Udayan into the back of the van and start it up, but then cut the engine... (full context)
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Udayan feels the bullets rip through him and hears only silence as he is pulled out... (full context)