The Man Who Would Be King

by

Rudyard Kipling

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Daniel Dravot Character Analysis

Daniel Dravot is the story’s other protagonist who, along with Peachey Carnehan, sets out to conquer the land of Kafiristan. Once they have conquered a few villages, however, Dravot immediately develops grander ambitions. He claims to be a god and a “son of Alexander”—that is, a descendant of Alexander the Great—and orders his subjects to make him a golden crown. Not content merely to rule Kafiristan, Dravot wants to create an empire. Spurred on by greed and hubris, he demands that the people of Kafiristan provide him with a wife. This is both against local custom and a violation of Dravot’s contract with Carnehan. Dravot’s bride, meanwhile, is terrified, as she believes that she will die if she marries a god; as soon as she is close enough, she bites him. Seeing Dravot’s blood, the people realize that he is not a god but a man, sparking a revolt against Dravot and Carnehan’s rule. The insurgents cut away the rope bridge on which Dravot is standing, and he plummets to his death. It is thus Dravot’s greed combined with his abandonment of his moral code—his contract with Carnehan—that leads to his downfall. Dravot’s rise and fall serve as a cautionary tale, suggesting that there could be catastrophic consequences if the British Empire loses its moral authority.

Daniel Dravot Quotes in The Man Who Would Be King

The The Man Who Would Be King quotes below are all either spoken by Daniel Dravot or refer to Daniel Dravot. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Knopf edition of The Man Who Would Be King published in 1994.
The Man Who Would Be King Quotes

“Would two lunatics make a Contrack like that?” said Carnehan, with subdued pride, showing me a greasy half-sheet of notepaper on which was written the following. I copied it, then and there, as a curiosity—

This Contract between me and you persuing witnesseth in the name of God—Amen and so forth.

(One) That me and you will settle this matter together; i.e., to be Kings of Kafiristan.

(Two) That you and me will not, while this matter is being settled, look at any Liquor, nor any Woman black, white, or brown, so as to get mixed up with one or the other harmful.

(Three) That we conduct ourselves with Dignity and Discretion, and, if one of us gets into trouble the other will stay by him.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot
Related Symbols: Contract
Page Number: 228
Explanation and Analysis:

They went up and up, and down and down, and that other party, Carnehan, was imploring of Dravot not to sing and whistle so loud, for fear of bringing down the tremenjus avalanches. But Dravot says that if a King couldn’t sing it wasn’t worth being King, and whacked the mules over the rump, and never took no heed for ten cold days.

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot
Page Number: 235
Explanation and Analysis:

Then ten men with bows and arrows ran down that valley, chasing twenty men with bows and arrows, and the row was tremenjus. They was fair men—fairer than you or me—with yellow hair and remarkable well built. Says Dravot, unpacking the guns—“This is the beginning of the business. We’ll fight for the ten men,” and with that he fires two rifles at the twenty men, and drops one of them at two hundred yards from the rock where he was sitting. The other men began to run, but Carnehan and Dravot sits on the boxes picking them off at all ranges, up and down the valley. Then we goes up to the ten men that had run across the snow too, and they fires a footy little arrow at us. Dravot he shoots above their heads, and they all falls down flat. Then he walks over them and kicks them, and then he lifts them up and shakes hands all round to make them friendly like.

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker)
Related Symbols: Martini-Henry Rifles
Page Number: 235–236
Explanation and Analysis:

Then all the people comes down and shouts like the devil and all, and Dravot says—“Go and dig the land, and be fruitful and multiply,” which they did, though they didn't understand. Then we asks the names of things in their lingo—bread and water and fire and idols and such, and Dravot leads the priest of each village up to the idol, and says he must sit there and judge the people, and if anything goes wrong he is to be shot.

Next week they was all turning up the land in the valley as quiet as bees and much prettier, and the priests heard all the complaints and told Dravot in dumb show what it was about.

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker)
Page Number: 237
Explanation and Analysis:

One morning I heard the devil’s own noise of drums and horns, and Dan Dravot marches down the hill with his Army and a tail of hundreds of men, and, which was the most amazing, a great gold crown on his head. “My Gord, Carnehan,” says Daniel, “this is a tremenjus business, and we’ve got the whole country as far as it’s worth having. I am the son of Alexander by Queen Semiramis, and you’re my younger brother and a God too! It’s the biggest thing we’ve ever seen. I’ve been marching and fighting for six weeks with the Army, and every footy little village for fifty miles has come in rejoiceful; and more than that, I’ve got the key of the whole show, as you’ll see, and I’ve got a crown for you! I told ’em to make two of ’em at a place called Shu, where the gold lies in the rock like suet in mutton. Gold I’ve seen, and turquoise I’ve kicked out of the cliffs, and there’s garnets in the sands of the river, and here’s a chunk of amber that a man brought me. Call up all the priests and, here, take your crown.”

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker)
Related Symbols: Golden Crown
Page Number: 239
Explanation and Analysis:

“Shake hands with him,” says Dravot, and I shook hands and nearly dropped, for Billy Fish gave me the Grip. I said nothing, but tried him with the Fellow Craft Grip. He answers all right, and I tried the Master’s Grip, but that was a slip. “A Fellow Craft he is!” I says to Dan. “Does he know the word?”—“He does,” says Dan, “and all the priests know. It’s a miracle! The Chiefs and the priests can work a Fellow Craft Lodge in a way that’s very like ours, and they’ve cut the marks on the rocks, but they don’t know the Third Degree, and they’ve come to find out. It’s Gord’s Truth. I’ve known these long years that the Afghans knew up to the Fellow Craft Degree, but this is a miracle. A God and a Grand-Master of the Craft am I, and a Lodge in the Third Degree I will open, and we’ll raise the head priests and the Chiefs of the villages.”

“It’s against all the law,” I says, “holding a Lodge without warrant from any one; and you know we never held office in any Lodge.”

“It’s a master-stroke o’ policy,” says Dravot.

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker), Billy Fish
Page Number: 240
Explanation and Analysis:

Dravot talked big about powder-shops and factories, walking up and down in the pine wood when the winter was coming on.

“I won’t make a Nation,” says he; “I’ll make an Empire! These men aren’t niggers; they’re English! Look at their eyes—look at their mouths. Look at the way they stand up. They sit on chairs in their own houses. They’re the Lost Tribes, or something like it, and they’ve grown to be English. I’ll take a census in the spring if the priests don’t get frightened. There must be a fair two million of ’em in these hills. The villages are full o’ little children. Two million people—two hundred and fifty thousand fighting men—and all English! They only want the rifles and a little drilling. Two hundred and fifty thousand men ready to cut in on Russia’s right flank when she tries for India! Peachey, man,” he says, chewing his beard in great hunks, “we shall be Emperors—Emperors of the Earth!”

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker)
Related Symbols: Martini-Henry Rifles
Page Number: 243–244
Explanation and Analysis:

“There’s another thing too,” says Dravot, walking up and down. “The winter’s coming, and these people won’t be giving much trouble, and if they do we can’t move about. I want a wife.”

“For Gord’s sake leave the women alone!” I says. “We’ve both got all the work we can, though I am a fool. Remember the Contrack, and keep clear o’ women.”

“The Contrack only lasted till such time as we was Kings; and Kings we have been these months past,” says Dravot, weighing his crown in his hand. “You go get a wife too, Peachey—a nice, strappin’, plump girl that’ll keep you warm in the winter. They’re prettier than English girls, and we can take the pick of ’em. Boil ’em once or twice in hot water, and they’ll come out like chicken and ham.”

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker)
Related Symbols: Contract, Golden Crown
Page Number: 245
Explanation and Analysis:

“The girl’s a little bit afraid,” says the priest. “She thinks she’s going to die, and they are a-heartening of her up down in the temple.”

“Hearten her very tender, then,” says Dravot, “or I’ll hearten you with the butt of a gun so you’ll never want to be heartened again.” He licked his lips, did Dan, and stayed up walking about more than half the night, thinking of the wife that he was going to get in the morning. I wasn’t any means comfortable, for I knew that dealings with a woman in foreign parts, though you was a crowned King twenty times over, could not but be risky.

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker)
Related Symbols: Golden Crown
Page Number: 248
Explanation and Analysis:

Up comes the girl, and a strapping wench she was, covered with silver and turquoises, but white as death, and looking back every minute at the priests. “She’ll do,” said Dan, looking her over. “What’s to be afraid of, lass? Come and kiss me.” He puts his arm round her. She shuts her eyes, gives a bit of a squeak, and down goes her face in the side of Dan’s flaming red beard. “The slut’s bitten me!” says he, clapping his hand to his neck, and, sure enough, his hand was red with blood. Billy Fish and two of his matchlock-men catches hold of Dan by the shoulders and drags him into the Bashkai lot, while the priests howls in their lingo, —“Neither God nor Devil, but a man!” I was all taken aback, for a priest cut at me in front, and the Army behind began firing into the Bashkai men.

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker), Billy Fish
Page Number: 249
Explanation and Analysis:

“My own notion is that Dan began to go mad in his head from that hour. He stared up and down like a stuck pig. Then he was all for walking back alone and killing the priests with his bare hands; which he could have done. “An Emperor am I,” says Daniel, “and next year I shall be a Knight of the Queen.”

“All right, Dan,” says I; “but come along now while there’s time.”

“It’s your fault,” says he, “for not looking after your Army better. There was mutiny in the midst, and you didn’t know—you damned engine-driving, plate-laying, missionary’s-pass-hunting hound!” He sat upon a rock and called me every foul name he could lay tongue to. I was too heart-sick to care, though it was all his foolishness that brought the smash.

“I’m sorry, Dan,” says I, “but there’s no accounting for natives. This business is our Fifty-Seven. Maybe we’ll make something out of it yet, when we’ve got to Bashkai.”

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker)
Page Number: 250
Explanation and Analysis:

They marched him a mile across that snow to a rope-bridge over a ravine with a river at the bottom. You may have seen such. They prodded him behind like an ox. “Damn your eyes!” says the King. “D’you suppose I can’t die like a gentleman?” He turns to Peachey—Peachey that was crying like a child. “I’ve brought you to this, Peachey,” says he. “Brought you out of your happy life to be killed in Kafiristan, where you was late Commander-in-Chief of the Emperor’s forces. Say you forgive me, Peachey.”—“I do,” says Peachey. “Fully and freely do I forgive you, Dan.”—“Shake hands, Peachey,” says he. “I’m going now.” Out he goes, looking neither right nor left, and when he was plumb in the middle of those dizzy dancing ropes, “Cut, you beggars,” he shouts; and they cut, and old Dan fell, turning round and round and round, twenty thousand miles, for he took half an hour to fall till he struck the water, and I could see his body caught on a rock with the gold crown close beside.

Related Characters: Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot (speaker)
Related Symbols: Golden Crown
Page Number: 252–253
Explanation and Analysis:

He fumbled in the mass of rags round his bent waist; brought out a black horsehair bag embroidered with silver thread; and shook therefrom on to my table—the dried, withered head of Daniel Dravot! The morning sun that had long been paling the lamps struck the red beard and blind, sunken eyes; struck, too, a heavy circlet of gold studded with raw turquoises, that Carnehan placed tenderly on the battered temples. “You be’old now,” said Carnehan, “the Emperor in his ’abit as he lived—the King of Kafiristan with his crown upon his head. Poor old Daniel that was a monarch once!”

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Peachey Carnehan (speaker), Daniel Dravot
Related Symbols: Golden Crown
Page Number: 253–254
Explanation and Analysis:
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Daniel Dravot Character Timeline in The Man Who Would Be King

The timeline below shows where the character Daniel Dravot appears in The Man Who Would Be King. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
The Man Who Would Be King
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
...the narrator arrives at Marwar Junction, he finds the train car of Carnehan’s friend, Daniel Dravot, another British loafer, and delivers the message. However, the narrator becomes concerned that his two... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
...He recognizes them as the two men from his journey on the train, Carnehan and Dravot. They feel the narrator owes them a favor in return for the “bad turn” he... (full context)
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Carnehan and Dravot want to stop scraping together a living from odd jobs and extortion. Instead, they will... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Women and Misogyny Theme Icon
The narrator believes Carnehan and Dravot’s plan is foolish and says they will be “cut to pieces” before they reach the... (full context)
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
At the market, it takes the narrator some time to recognize Dravot and Carnehan, as they have disguised themselves as a mad priest and his servant. They... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
...for whisky and gulps it down. He says, “I was the King of Kafiristan—me and Dravot—crowned Kings we was!” After assuring the narrator that he is not mad, though he thinks... (full context)
Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Carnehan and Dravot (in Carnehan’s story) make their way into the mountains. When the terrain becomes too mountainous... (full context)
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Just after Carnehan and Dravot run out of food and have to slaughter the mules, they see twenty men chasing... (full context)
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
The men lead Carnehan and Dravot back to their village, where there is a group of stone idols. Dravot pretends to... (full context)
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Women and Misogyny Theme Icon
One day, men from a nearby village attack. Again using their Martini rifles, Carnehan and Dravot defeat the attackers. They ask the villagers what has caused the conflict between the two... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Dravot tells the Kafirs in the village they have conquered, “Go and dig the land, and... (full context)
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Carnehan and Dravot train twenty men to use the Martini rifles, and they conquer another village. As they... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
When Dravot finally returns, he is leading an army of hundreds and wearing a golden crown. He... (full context)
Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
After Carnehan puts on his crown, Dravot says, “we don’t want to fight no more. The Craft’s the trick.” The Craft here... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Race and Racism Theme Icon
At the lodge meeting, Dravot says he and Carnehan are “Gods and sons of Alexander, and Past Grand-Masters in the... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
After the meeting, Dravot makes plans to continue strengthening the army. He also states that he trusts the Kafirs,... (full context)
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Dravot begins to make grander plans. He holds councils of war with the local chiefs (including... (full context)
Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Race and Racism Theme Icon
After Carnehan’s return, Dravot takes him aside to speak privately in a grove of pine trees. “I won’t make... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
Carnehan is distressed by this and tells Dravot he’s done all he could: “I’ve drilled the men and shown the people how to... (full context)
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Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Women and Misogyny Theme Icon
Dravot tells Carnehan that he wants a wife. Carnehan objects and reminds Dravot of their contract,... (full context)
Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
However, when Dravot tells the council that he wants a wife, Billy Fish tells him he’ll have to... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
Women and Misogyny Theme Icon
The priests finally comply with Dravot’s demand, choosing a girl for him to marry. She is terrified, but Dravot doesn’t seem... (full context)
Ambition and Hubris Theme Icon
Billy Fish and his men, who remain loyal to Carnehan and Dravot, help them to flee the village, though many of Billy Fish’s men are killed in... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
The rebels slit Billy Fish’s throat, and they march Dravot and Carnehan to a rope bridge. They prod Dravot toward the bridge, and, after saying... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
Civilization and the Colonized Theme Icon
...survives the night, they decide it’s a miracle and cut him down. They give him Dravot’s head and crown as a gift and tell him to go home. Carnehan says that... (full context)
Morality and Colonialism Theme Icon
...office, as Carnehan brings his story to an end, he opens a bag and shakes Dravot’s head onto the narrator’s desk. The crown also falls from the bag, and Carnehan places... (full context)