The Master and Margarita

The Master and Margarita

On the second day of the novel, Styopa, the director of the Variety theater, wakes up in the apartment he shares with Berlioz nursing a terrible hangover. He is flabbergasted to see Woland sitting in his room (though Woland’s identity is not revealed till later); Woland informs Styopa that he has agreed to let him perform at the Variety. Styopa is then shown a contract that seems to have his own signature on it, seemingly proving the stranger’s story to be true. Woland also tells Styopa that he will be taking over the apartment and that there is no longer any room for him there; in an instant, Styopa is transported to Yalta, thousands of miles away. Styopa tries to telegram his workplace but the staff are baffled: there is no way he could have travelled so far in such a short time.

Styopa Likhodeev Quotes in The Master and Margarita

The The Master and Margarita quotes below are all either spoken by Styopa Likhodeev or refer to Styopa Likhodeev. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Random House edition of The Master and Margarita published in 1965.
Chapter 7 Quotes

And then the bedroom started spinning around Styopa, he hit his head

against the doorpost, and, losing consciousness, thought: ‘I’m dying...’

But he did not die. Opening his eyes slightly, he saw himself sitting on something made of stone. Around him something was making noise. When he opened his eyes properly, he realized that the noise was being made by the sea and, what’s more, that the waves were rocking just at his feet, that he was, in short, sitting at the very end of a jetty, that over him was a brilliant blue sky and behind him a white city on the mountains.

Not knowing how to behave in such a case, Styopa got up on his trembling legs and walked along the jetty towards the shore.

Some man was standing on the jetty, smoking and spitting into the sea. He looked at Styopa with wild eyes and stopped spitting.

Then Styopa pulled the following stunt: he knelt down before the unknown smoker and said:

‘I implore you, tell me what city is this?’

‘Really!’ said the heartless smoker.

‘I’m not drunk,’ Styopa replied hoarsely, ‘something’s happened to

me... I’m ill... Where am I? What city is this?’

‘Well, it’s Yalta...’

Styopa quietly gasped and sank down on his side, his head striking the

warm stone of the jetty. Consciousness left him.

Related Characters: Styopa Likhodeev (speaker), Woland
Page Number: 84-85
Explanation and Analysis:
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Styopa Likhodeev Character Timeline in The Master and Margarita

The timeline below shows where the character Styopa Likhodeev appears in The Master and Margarita. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 7. A Naughty Apartment
The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
The Danger and Absurdity of Soviet Society Theme Icon
Styopa Likhodeev, Berlioz’s flat mate and director of the Variety theater, wakes with a terrible hangover.... (full context)
The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
Styopa, suffering under the weight of his headache, tries to call out for Berlioz to bring... (full context)
Courage and Cowardice Theme Icon
The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
The stranger explains that he has been waiting for an hour for Styopa to wake up—apparently the two men had arranged to have a meeting. “Here I am!”... (full context)
The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
Memories of the night before start to return to Styopa as he eats the breakfast and drinks the vodka—but none of them chime with the... (full context)
The Danger and Absurdity of Soviet Society Theme Icon
Woland proceeds to recount the previous day’s events for Styopa. Apparently, Woland had visited Styopa and agreed a contract for seven performances at the Variety... (full context)
The Danger and Absurdity of Soviet Society Theme Icon
Styopa asks to look at the contract. When Woland produces the document, Styopa is amazed to... (full context)
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Styopa decides to telephone Rimsky to check if what Woland says is true. Rimsky confirms that... (full context)
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The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
The Danger and Absurdity of Soviet Society Theme Icon
Styopa calls out to Grunya to ask what the black cat and the tall man are... (full context)
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Art and Authenticity Theme Icon
The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
The Danger and Absurdity of Soviet Society Theme Icon
The tall man with the pince-nez talks with a goatish voice, telling Styopa off for drinking too much and abusing his position in aid of “liaisons with women.”... (full context)
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Suddenly the cat shouts “Scat!” Styopa feels a knock on the head and loses consciousness, thinking that perhaps he is dying.... (full context)
Chapter 8. The Combat Between the Professor and the Poet
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At the same time that Styopa is transported to Yalta, Ivan wakes up groggily in the clinic. He presses a button... (full context)
Chapter 9. Koroviev’s Stunts
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Nikanor heads up to Berlioz and Styopa’s apartment, which is no. 50 and on the fifth floor. Using his own set of... (full context)
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The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
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...be sitting in a deceased man’s study and, furthermore, that he received no notice from Styopa about his loan of the apartment to Mr. Woland. Koroviev tells him to look in... (full context)
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...as he protests incoherently about Koroviev. He is astonished to find no contract, letter from Styopa, rental money, or theater pass in his his briefcase. As he is led away from... (full context)
Chapter 10. News from Yalta
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The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
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...Magic and its Full Exposure.” Neither man has met Woland, and both are annoyed that Styopa, who yesterday had come running into the office “like crazy” to get the performance contract... (full context)
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...from a police authority; it suggests that a shoeless man claiming to be Director Likhodeev (Styopa) has been detained in Yalta as a “mental case.” Rimsky and Varenukha assume this to... (full context)
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...mentions “Woland” and “hypnosis,” asking Rimsky and Varenukha to confirm the man in Yalta is Styopa. The two men are baffled, assuming that Styopa must be drunk. (full context)
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...Varenukha’s amazement, a third telegram then arrives with a piece of photographic paper clearly showing Styopa’s handwriting and signature. This, says the telegram, is proof that it’s from Styopa and adds... (full context)
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The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
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...telegrams in an envelope and instructs Varenukha to take them to the authorities. Rimsky phones Styopa’s apartment and manages to get through; Koroviev informs him that Styopa has gone for a... (full context)
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...Rimsky receives yet another telegram, this time asking for five hundred roubles and saying that Styopa intends to fly back to Moscow the next day. Rimsky sends the money to the... (full context)
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...characters drag Varenukha down Sadovaya street and into apartment no. 50, which Varenukha recognizes as Styopa’s apartment. Suddenly he is confronted by a naked woman (Hella), who insists on giving him... (full context)
Chapter 14. Glory to the Cock!
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...him on why he hadn’t returned earlier, Varenukha spins him a story appearing to explain Styopa’s disappearance, alleging that the theater director had had a night of drunken debauchery, sent the... (full context)
Chapter 17. An Unquiet Day
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The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
...of the Variety theater wanting to buy tickets for Woland’s next performance that evening. With Styopa, Rimsky, and Varenukha all missing, the Variety’s bookkeeper, Vassily Stepanovich Lastochkin, is surprised to find... (full context)
Chapter 27. The End of Apartment no. 50
The Ambiguity of Good and Evil Theme Icon
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...he is too scared to talk about what happened to him. They also track down Styopa, who is returning to Moscow on a flight from Yalta. They can find no trace... (full context)
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The investigators theorize that Berlioz was made to kill himself through hypnosis. When Styopa returns and tells his story, they assume that he too has been a victim of... (full context)
Epilogue
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...by. Georges Bengalsky never returns to the theater, and weeps anxiously every spring full moon. Styopa moves to another town and becomes the manager of a food store. Rimsky takes a... (full context)