The Master and Margarita

The Master and Margarita

Woland Character Analysis

Woland is the novel’s central character. He is Satan, choosing to adopt the form of Woland for his visit to Moscow. A paradoxical figure, Woland is both manipulative and honorable, ruthless and generous. His physical appearance is that of a “foreigner,” often dressed in a black cloak, with different colored eyes reflecting to the complexity of his nature. He also often walks with a stick embellished with a figurine of a poodle’s head, one of many signs linking Woland with the devil-figure found in Goethe’s Faust (his Germanic-sounding name and the novel’s epigraph being the other two prominent references). He differs greatly from the traditional idea of the devil, in that Woland does not seek to torture mankind for his enjoyment, but to expose and draw out the worst in people so that it is there for all to see. In this, his role is remarkably similar to the idea of the artist as someone who holds up a mirror to society. He is an advocate not for evil itself, but for the acknowledgement and understanding of evil’s place in the world. He expresses this best to Matthew Levi towards the end of the novel, explaining that good can’t exist without evil just as people and things can’t exist without casting a shadow. He is thus a kind of philosophical figure, a true “foreigner” from beyond the moral spheres of mankind, whose rule is to highlight the hypocrisy and folly of mankind’s arrogant behaviors. Ultimately, he comes across as noble and fair, granting Margarita her reunion with the master and encouraging the master to set Pontius Pilate free. Though he is of unquestionably high spiritual authority—hence his loyal entourage—the end of the novel indicates that he also has to take orders from Yeshua Ha-Nozri. Woland can take on different forms, and it is strongly suggested that he is present during the Pilate narrative as a sparrow.

Woland Quotes in The Master and Margarita

The The Master and Margarita quotes below are all either spoken by Woland or refer to Woland. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Random House edition of The Master and Margarita published in 1965.
Chapter 1 Quotes

First of all, the man described did not limp on any leg, and was neither short nor enormous, but simply tall. As for his teeth, he had platinum crowns on the left side and gold on the right. He was wearing an expensive grey suit and imported shoes of a matching colour. His grey beret was cocked rakishly over one ear; under his arm he carried a stick with a black knob shaped like a poodle’s head. He looked to be a little over forty. Mouth somehow twisted. Clean-shaven. Dark-haired. Right eye black, left – for some reason – green. Dark eyebrows, but one higher than the other. In short, a foreigner.

Related Characters: Woland
Page Number: 10
Explanation and Analysis:
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The foreigner sat back on the bench and asked, even with a slight shriek of curiosity:

‘You are - atheists?!’

‘Yes, we’re atheists,’ Berlioz smilingly replied, and Homeless thought, getting angry: ‘Latched on to us, the foreign goose!’

‘Oh, how lovely!’ the astonishing foreigner cried out and began swivelling his head, looking from one writer to the other.

‘In our country atheism does not surprise anyone,’ Berlioz said with diplomatic politeness. ‘The majority of our population consciously and long ago ceased believing in the fairy tales about God.’

Page Number: 12
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 7 Quotes

And then the bedroom started spinning around Styopa, he hit his head

against the doorpost, and, losing consciousness, thought: ‘I’m dying...’

But he did not die. Opening his eyes slightly, he saw himself sitting on something made of stone. Around him something was making noise. When he opened his eyes properly, he realized that the noise was being made by the sea and, what’s more, that the waves were rocking just at his feet, that he was, in short, sitting at the very end of a jetty, that over him was a brilliant blue sky and behind him a white city on the mountains.

Not knowing how to behave in such a case, Styopa got up on his trembling legs and walked along the jetty towards the shore.

Some man was standing on the jetty, smoking and spitting into the sea. He looked at Styopa with wild eyes and stopped spitting.

Then Styopa pulled the following stunt: he knelt down before the unknown smoker and said:

‘I implore you, tell me what city is this?’

‘Really!’ said the heartless smoker.

‘I’m not drunk,’ Styopa replied hoarsely, ‘something’s happened to

me... I’m ill... Where am I? What city is this?’

‘Well, it’s Yalta...’

Styopa quietly gasped and sank down on his side, his head striking the

warm stone of the jetty. Consciousness left him.

Related Characters: Styopa Likhodeev (speaker), Woland
Page Number: 84-85
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 12 Quotes

‘And so, now comes the famous foreign artist. Monsieur Woland, with a séance of black magic. Well, both you and I know,’ here Bengalsky smiled a wise smile, ‘that there’s no such thing in the world, and that it’s all just superstition, and Maestro Woland is simply a perfect master of the technique of conjuring, as we shall see from the most interesting part, that is, the exposure of this technique, and since we’re all of us to a man both for technique and for its exposure, let’s bring on Mr Woland!’

Related Characters: Georges Bengalsky (speaker), Woland
Page Number: 122
Explanation and Analysis:
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In a few seconds, the rain of money, ever thickening, reached the seats, and the spectators began snatching at it.

Hundreds of arms were raised, the spectators held the bills up to the lighted stage and saw the most true and honest-to-God watermarks. The smell also left no doubts: it was the incomparably delightful smell of freshly printed money. The whole theatre was seized first with merriment and then with amazement. The word ‘money, money!’ hummed everywhere, there were gasps of ‘ah, ah!’ and merry laughter. One or two were already crawling in the aisles, feeling under the chairs. Many stood on the seats, trying to catch the flighty, capricious notes.

Related Characters: Woland, Koroviev
Page Number: 124-125
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 17 Quotes

At a huge writing desk with a massive inkstand an empty suit sat and with a dry pen, not dipped in ink, traced on a piece of paper. The suit was wearing a necktie, a fountain pen stuck from its pocket, but above the collar there was neither neck nor head, just as there were no hands sticking out of the sleeves. The suit was immersed in work and completely ignored the turmoil that reigned around it. Hearing someone come in, the suit leaned back and from above the collar came the voice, quite familiar to the bookkeeper, of Prokhor Petrovich:

‘What is this? Isn’t it written on the door that I’m not receiving?’

The beautiful secretary shrieked and, wringing her hands, cried out: ‘You see? You see?! He’s not there! He’s not! Bring him back, bring

him back!’

Here someone peeked in the door of the office, gasped, and flew out. The bookkeeper felt his legs trembling and sat on the edge of a chair,

but did not forget to pick up his briefcase. Anna Richardovna hopped around the bookkeeper, worrying his jacket, and exclaiming:

‘I always, always stopped him when he swore by the devil! So now the devil’s got him!’

Related Symbols: Briefcases
Page Number: 188
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 23 Quotes

‘Mikhail Alexandrovich,’ Woland addressed the head in a low voice, and then the slain man’s eyelids rose, and on the dead face Margarita saw, with a shudder, living eyes filled with thought and suffering.

‘Everything came to pass, did it not?’ Woland went on, looking into the head’s eyes. ‘The head was cut off by a woman, the meeting did not take place, and I am living in your apartment. That is a fact. And fact is the most stubborn thing in the world. But we are now interested in what follows, and not in this already accomplished fact. You have always been an ardent preacher of the theory that, on the cutting off of his head, life ceases in a man, he turns to ashes and goes into non-being. I have the pleasure of informing you, in the presence of my guests, though they serve as proof of quite a different theory, that your theory is both solid and clever.

However, one theory is as good as another. There is also one which holds that it will be given to each according to his faith. Let it come true! You go into non-being, and from the cup into which you are to be transformed, I will joyfully drink to being!’

Woland raised his sword. Straight away the flesh of the head turned dark and shrivelled, then fell off in pieces, the eyes disappeared, and soon Margarita saw on the platter a yellowish skull with emerald eyes, pearl teeth and a golden foot. The lid opened on a hinge.

Related Characters: Woland (speaker), Margarita, Mikhael Alexandrovich Berlioz
Page Number: 273
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 24 Quotes

‘But tell me, why does Margarita call you a master?’ asked Woland. The man smiled and said:

‘That is an excusable weakness. She has too high an opinion of a novel

I wrote.’

‘What is this novel about?’

‘It is a novel about Pontius Pilate.’ Here again the tongues of the candles swayed and leaped, the dishes on the table clattered, Woland burst into thunderous laughter, but neither frightened nor surprised anyone. Behemoth applauded for some reason.

‘About what? About what? About whom?’ said Woland, ceasing to laugh.

‘And that - now? It’s stupendous! Couldn’t you have found some other subject? Let me see it.’ Woland held out his hand, palm up.

‘Unfortunately, I cannot do that,’ replied the master, ‘because I burned it in the stove.’

‘Forgive me, but I don’t believe you,’ Woland replied, ‘that cannot be: manuscripts don’t burn.’ He turned to Behemoth and said, ‘Come on. Behemoth, let’s have the novel.’

The cat instantly jumped off the chair, and everyone saw that he had been sitting on a thick stack of manuscripts. With a bow, the cat gave the top copy to Woland. Margarita trembled and cried out, again shaken to the point of tears:

‘It’s here, the manuscript! It’s here!’ She dashed to Woland and added in admiration:

‘All-powerful! All-powerful!’

Related Characters: Woland (speaker), Margarita (speaker), The Master (speaker), Pontius Pilate, Behemoth
Page Number: 286-287
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 29 Quotes

‘If you’ve come to see me, why didn’t you wish me a good evening, former tax collector?’ Woland said sternly.

‘Because I don’t wish you a good anything,’ the newcomer replied insolently.

‘But you’ll have to reconcile yourself to that,’ Woland objected, and a grin twisted his mouth. ‘You no sooner appear on the roof than you produce an absurdity, and I’ll tell you what it is — it’s your intonation. You uttered your words as if you don’t acknowledge shadows, or evil either. Kindly consider the question: what would your good do if evil did not exist, and what would the earth look like if shadows disappeared from it? Shadows are cast by objects and people. Here is the shadow of my sword. Trees and living beings also have shadows. Do you want to skin the whole earth, tearing all the trees and living things off it, because of your fantasy of enjoying bare light? You’re a fool.’

Related Characters: Woland (speaker), Matthew Levi (speaker)
Page Number: 360
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 32 Quotes

Here Woland turned to the master and said:

‘Well, now you can finish your novel with one phrase!’

The master seemed to have been expecting this, as he stood motionless and looked at the seated procurator. He cupped his hands to his mouth and cried out so that the echo leaped over the unpeopled and unforested mountains:

‘You’re free! You’re free! He is waiting for you!’

The mountains turned the master’s voice to thunder, and by this same thunder they were destroyed. The accursed rocky walls collapsed. Only the platform with the stone armchair remained. Over the black abyss into which the walls had gone, a boundless city lit up, dominated by gleaming idols above a garden grown luxuriously over many thousands of moons. The path of moonlight so long awaited by the procurator stretched right to this garden, and the first to rush down it was the sharp-eared dog. The man in the white cloak with blood-red lining rose from the armchair and shouted something in a hoarse, cracked voice. It was impossible to tell whether he was weeping or laughing, or what he shouted. It could only be seen that, following his faithful guardian, he, too, rushed headlong down the path of moonlight.

Related Characters: Woland (speaker), The Master (speaker), Pontius Pilate, Banga
Related Symbols: The Moon/Moonlight
Page Number: 382
Explanation and Analysis:
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Woland Character Timeline in The Master and Margarita

The timeline below shows where the character Woland appears in The Master and Margarita. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1. Never Talk with Strangers
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A foreign-looking man , wearing an expensive suit, a beret, and carrying a stick “with a black knob... (full context)
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As Berlioz and Ivan try to figure out where he is from, the stranger expresses his amazement that Berlioz thinks of Jesus as made-up. He asks if it follows... (full context)
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The stranger asks Berlioz for his opinion on the “five proofs of God’s existence.” Berlioz dismisses these;... (full context)
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As they discuss the issue of mortality, the stranger seemingly predicts how Berlioz will die, telling him that his “head will be cut off... (full context)
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Much to Ivan’s shock, the stranger address him by his name. The man explains that he has read Ivan’s poems. Berlioz... (full context)
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Having somehow comprehended what Berlioz and Ivan were saying, the stranger produces his passport, invitation to a consultation in Moscow, and his personal business card (on... (full context)
Chapter 2. Pontius Pilate
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The stranger ’s story is set at the Palace of Herod in Yershalaim, approximately two millennia ago.... (full context)
Chapter 3. The Seventh Proof
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The professor ’s story comes to an end as the main narrative returns to Moscow. Berlioz tells... (full context)
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Berlioz asks the professor where he intends to stay during his visit to Moscow. The professor, winking, says he’ll... (full context)
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Berlioz decides to sneak off and make a phone call to the “foreigner’s bureau” to report the professor. The latter then implores him to believe in the devil,... (full context)
Chapter 4. The Chase
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...oil by the turnstile, making the floor slippery. Ivan realizes that this is precisely what the professor had talked about earlier. (full context)
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Ivan tries desperately to figure out what happened, concluding that the professor can’t have been insane and, furthermore, must have set up Berlioz’s death. He goes back... (full context)
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Ivan asks the professor to confess his identity, but he pretends to not speak Russian. Koroviev tells Ivan not... (full context)
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Ivan keeps chasing the professor , “struck by the supernatural speed of the chase.” After many twists and turns, Ivan... (full context)
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...apartment and heads to the Moscow river, convinced now that this is where he’ll find the professor . Ivan dives into the water, entrusting his clothes to a stranger nearby. (full context)
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...attire. He decides to head to Griboedov’s, the building that houses Massolit, thinking he’ll find the professor there. As he tries to make his way unseen through the city, passers-by are shocked... (full context)
Chapter 5. There Were Doings at Griboedov’s
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Ivan rants frenziedly about the events surrounding the strange professor , making little sense to anyone in the restaurant. He tells them that the professor... (full context)
Chapter 6. Schizophrenia, as was Said
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...questions Ivan on his story. Barely stopping to catch his breath, Ivan explains all about the strange professor —how he knew about Berlioz’s death before it happened, and that he had spoken personally... (full context)
Chapter 7. A Naughty Apartment
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...to call out for Berlioz to bring him aspirin. He opens eyes, shocked to discover a strange man in his room, dressed in a black and wearing a beret. (full context)
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The stranger explains that he has been waiting for an hour for Styopa to wake up—apparently the... (full context)
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...before him. Sensing Styopa’s confusion, the stranger announces who he is: “Professor of black magic Woland.” (full context)
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Woland proceeds to recount the previous day’s events for Styopa. Apparently, Woland had visited Styopa and... (full context)
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Styopa asks to look at the contract. When Woland produces the document, Styopa is amazed to see his signature on there, alongside that of... (full context)
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Styopa decides to telephone Rimsky to check if what Woland says is true. Rimsky confirms that Styopa had indeed approved and signed the contract yesterday,... (full context)
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...to ask what the black cat and the tall man are doing in the apartment. Woland responds, saying they are with him, and that he has sent Grunya off for a... (full context)
Chapter 8. The Combat Between the Professor and the Poet
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...Ivan considers his options: he could violently resist his situation; take up his account of the professor and Pontius Pilate again; or “withdraw into proud silence.” He chooses the third option. (full context)
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...and proceeds to re-tell what happened to him the day before, once again mentioning that the strange professor he encountered had seen Pontius Pilate in person. Ivan explains that the professor had mentioned... (full context)
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...to him, and reasons that, if Ivan goes to the police for help in catching the professor and his entourage, he will most likely be back in the clinic within two hours.... (full context)
Chapter 9. Koroviev’s Stunts
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...a foreign individual who has taken up residence in this apartment.” He explains that Mr. Woland, “a foreign artiste,” has been granted use of the apartment during the week of his... (full context)
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...that he received no notice from Styopa about his loan of the apartment to Mr. Woland. Koroviev tells him to look in his briefcase, in which Nikanor is staggered to find... (full context)
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Nikanor demands to see the foreigner, but Koroviev objects that he is currently training the cat; Koroviev offers to show Nikanor... (full context)
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Koroviev points out that the tenants’ association will be handsomely rewarded for letting Woland stay. Tempted by the promise of money, Nikanor calls the “foreign tourist bureau,” who readily... (full context)
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Koroviev calls out to Woland to agree the rental price and tells Nikanor to ask for a vastly inflated sum.... (full context)
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...it was that Koroviev gained access to Berlioz’s study when it had been sealed. Meanwhile, Woland tells Koroviev that he doesn’t want Nikanor, “a chiseler and a crook,” to come to... (full context)
Chapter 10. News from Yalta
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...Varenukha, its administrator, are sitting in the theatre offices. An usher brings the posters for Woland’s performance, which advertise: “PROFESSOR WOLAND—Seancés of Black Magic and its Full Exposure.” Neither man has... (full context)
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...the same woman brings another telegram, which begs that they believe the first and mentions “Woland” and “hypnosis,” asking Rimsky and Varenukha to confirm the man in Yalta is Styopa. The... (full context)
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...telegram, is proof that it’s from Styopa and adds that the two men should “watch Woland.” They can’t figure out how Styopa could be in Yalta, over nine hundred miles away,... (full context)
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Varenukha, carrying a briefcase containing the telegrams, passes by the box office. Tickets for Woland’s performance are nearly sold out. As Varenukha goes by, the phone rings for him—a “nasty... (full context)
Chapter 11. Ivan Splits in Two
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...one part of himself letting go of the situation, with another part reminding him that the strange professor had known about Berlioz’s death before it happened. (full context)
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As he thinks placidly about the conversation with the professor at Patriach’s Ponds, Ivan hears a deep voice call him “a fool.” Ivan doesn’t mind... (full context)
Chapter 12. Black Magic and Its Exposure
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...showtime at the Variety Theater. In the packed auditorium, the Giulli family open up for Woland’s performance with their cycling trapeze act. Meanwhile, Rimsky, still in the office, wonders why Varenukha... (full context)
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A messenger informs Rimsky that Woland has arrived, and Rimsky goes to meet him backstage. He finds Woland sitting with his... (full context)
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...master of ceremonies, Georges Bengalsky, enters the stage and addresses the audience. He announces “Maestro Woland” and his “séance of black magic,” while also pointing out that “there’s no such thing... (full context)
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The audience welcomes Woland to the stage with Koroviev and the black cat. Woland, addressing Koroviev as “Fagott,” suggests... (full context)
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Woland asks Koroviev if he had “expressed admiration,” causing Koroviev to call Bengalsky a liar. Woland... (full context)
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...proving in the best way possible that there are no miracles in magic.” He asks Woland to explain how he did it. (full context)
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...doctor!” He makes the head promise to stop talking “such drivel” before the cat, on Woland’s orders, restores the head to the body.  (full context)
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...Apollonovich, shouts down from one of the boxes, saying that, though the trick is impressive, Woland and company must now explain how they did it.  (full context)
Chapter 13. The Hero Enters
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...that Berlioz, being a learned man, didn’t realize. On the other hand, says the man, Woland is “capable of pulling the wool over the eyes of an even shrewder man.” (full context)
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...asks Ivan, shouldn’t someone “catch him?” The master says he wishes that he had met Woland, and he’d gladly give up the last thing he has—the clinic keys—to do so. Ivan... (full context)
Chapter 14. Glory to the Cock!
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...happened in the theater, sits in his office, staring at the “magic” banknotes used in Woland’s show. Hearing a commotion outside, he looks out of the window to see that the... (full context)
Chapter 17. An Unquiet Day
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...there is a huge queue outside of the Variety theater wanting to buy tickets for Woland’s next performance that evening. With Styopa, Rimsky, and Varenukha all missing, the Variety’s bookkeeper, Vassily... (full context)
Chapter 18. Hapless Visitors
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...to complain that that the bar’s takings are down on account of the “fake” money Woland used in his séance. Hella, naked, putrid-smelling, greets Andrei at the door, before seeing him... (full context)
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On learning that Andrei is the Variety barman, Woland lambasts the food served at the Variety buffet, specifically the sturgeon. Andrei, slightly confused, says... (full context)
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Andrei then tries to raise the question of the money. Woland invites him to sit down, but the stool collapses, spilling red wine all over Andrei,... (full context)
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Woland offers Andrei a drink and asks if he would like to play dominoes or cards.... (full context)
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Andrei again tries to ask about the money, referring to Woland’s séance. Woland tells Andrei a secret: “I’m not an artiste at all, I simply wanted... (full context)
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Woland asks Andrei if the Muscovites are crooks, to which Andrei admits that some of them... (full context)
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Worried by Woland’s prediction, Andrei heads right away to a nearby doctor, who happens to be a specialist... (full context)
Chapter 19. Margarita
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...is there to speak to Margarita about some “business.” He explains that “a very distinguished foreigner” would like her company that very evening. She takes this as an indecent proposition, becoming... (full context)
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...confirms. If she wants to know more, says Azazello, she needs to meet with the “foreigner.” (full context)
Chapter 20. Azazello’s Cream
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...for herself. Margarita impassionedly cries out that Azazello is about to call, and that “the foreigner’s not dangerous, yes, I understand now that he’s not dangerous!” (full context)
Chapter 22. By Candlelight
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...that she has guessed who is the “host” of the evening. Koroviev explains that “Messire” (Woland) puts on an annual “spring ball of the full moon.” Margarita, he says, is to... (full context)
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...in their own time was extremely great.” That said, their powers are nothing compared to Woland’s, continues Koroviev. He also implies that Margarita has royal blood, offering a relation to a... (full context)
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In the candlelight Margarita sees Woland reclining on the bed, staring at her. She notices one eye “with a golden spark,”... (full context)
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Woland greets Margarita, asking her to excuse his “homely attire.” He places his hand, “heavy as... (full context)
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Woland introduces Margarita to his retinue: Behemoth, Azazello, Koroviev, and Hella, who is rubbing his knee... (full context)
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Hella leaves the room; Margarita takes over with the ointment. Woland says that his “attendants” insist that his knee trouble is caused by rheumatism, but he... (full context)
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Woland shows Margarita his globe, which sits on a nearby table. It seems to show an... (full context)
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On Woland’s invitation, Margarita looks closer at the globe. She sees a house get destroyed, and “a... (full context)
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Woland makes Abaddon appear; he is a gaunt man wearing glasses. Margarita asks if he can... (full context)
Chapter 23. The Great Ball at Satan’s
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Woland’s entourage prepares Margarita for the ball: Hella douses her in blood and rose oil and... (full context)
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...she has one last “appearance” to make. She climbs onto a platform in the ballroom. Woland, limping and carrying a sword, joins her as the crowd falls silent and a clock... (full context)
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Woland addresses Berlioz’s head, talking about Berlioz’s theory that when a person dies they go into... (full context)
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Just then, a final guest arrives: Baron Meigel. Woland introduces him to the audience as “an employee of the Spectacles commission, in charge of... (full context)
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Woland, however, is suspicious of Baron Meigel, thinking he is a “stool-pigeon and a spy.” Abaddon... (full context)
Chapter 24. The Extraction of the Master
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Margarita finds herself back in Woland’s bedroom with Woland and his entourage. Behemoth pours her drink, which restores a “living warmth”... (full context)
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...being the hostess. When she thinks better of asking for help in finding the master, Woland declares how impressed they all are with her behavior—that she has passed the “test”: “never... (full context)
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Woland asks Margarita to make a wish. She asks for Frieda, one of the ball guests,... (full context)
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Margarita gets up to leave, but Woland insists that she demand something for herself. Without hesitation, she requests that “my beloved master... (full context)
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Woland converses with the master, who says he has come “from the house of sorrows” and... (full context)
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When Woland asks why Margarita calls him “the master,” the master tells Woland about his Pontius Pilate... (full context)
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Margarita rushes to Woland, calling him “all-powerful!” The master clutches the novel, lapsing into “anxiety and uneasiness.” Koroviev gives... (full context)
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...the lamp be burning, and that everything be as it was.” The master laughs, telling Woland that someone else has been living there for a long time. (full context)
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...apartment. In a fit of rage, Margarita scratches Aloisy’s tearful face; Koroviev pulls her away. Woland magically turns Aloisy upside down and sends him out of the open window. (full context)
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Woland asks Margarita what she would like to do with Natasha. Natasha comes in and begs... (full context)
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...Nikolai gone, Varenukha appears. He requests to no longer be a vampire, which Azazello grants. Woland instructs his entourage to leave him alone with the master and Margarita. The master denounces... (full context)
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Woland gives Margarita a memento: “a small golden horseshoe studded with diamonds.” Woland wishes Margarita and... (full context)
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It transpires that Annushka lives in the flat below the one occupied by Woland and his entourage. She watched in amazement as a series of distressed individuals fled apartment... (full context)
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...horseshoe back, but also gives her two hundred roubles. Azazello returns the horseshoe to Margarita. Woland and his entourage come to the car to see the master and Margarita on their... (full context)
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...the sofa as Margarita, weeping, begins to read from his novel. Feeling in awe of Woland’s power, she kisses the notebooks and reads: “The darkness that came from the Mediterranean Sea... (full context)
Chapter 27. The End of Apartment no. 50
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...Arkady Apollonovich about his experience at the theater, who confirms that the magician’s name was Woland. Investigators visit the Sadovaya Street apartment more than once but find no-one there. Nor is... (full context)
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The investigators are baffled: Woland seems to have vanished, along with the top tier staff of the Variety theater. They... (full context)
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...that Nikanor Ivanovich Bosoy, George Bengalsky, and Ivan Nokolaevich Homeless have all been victims of Woland’s gang. They interview Ivan, but he longer seems interested in helping to catch Woland or... (full context)
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...Varenukha turns up and tries to lie about what’s happened to him, scared of incurring Woland’s wrath. He too asks to be placed in a cell. (full context)
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...relishes the excitement; despite many shots being fired, miraculously no-one is hurt. Koroviev, Azazello, and Woland complain about the commotion from another room. Koroviev says: “Messire! It’s Saturday. Then sun is... (full context)
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...inhabitants. As fire engines arrive on the scene, the people outside notice the silhouettes of Woland and his entourage flying out of the fifth-story window. (full context)
Chapter 29. The Fate of the Master and Margarita is Decided
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It’s now sunset—Azazello and Woland sit on a stone terrace overlooking Moscow. Woland ask “such an interesting city, is it... (full context)
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Suddenly, Matthew Levi appears, saying he has come to see Woland. Woland tells Levi that he ought to wish him a good evening, but Matthew responds... (full context)
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Matthew Levi informs Woland that Yeshua Ha-Nozri has read the master’s novel and asks that Woland reward the master... (full context)
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Matthew Levi adds that Yeshua’s request extends to Margarita too; Woland agrees to this as well. As Matthew Levi disappears, Woland instructs Azazello to “fly to... (full context)
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Behemoth and Koroviev arrive, telling Woland that Griboedev’s has been “reduced to ashes.” Behemoth is holding a picture looted from one... (full context)
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Behemoth and Koroviev say that they await Woland’s orders, but he tells them there are none: “you have fulfilled all you could, and... (full context)
Chapter 30. It’s Time! It’s Time!
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Margarita, still naked except for the black cloak given to her by Woland, and the master, still in his hospital gown, sit in their apartment, conversing happily. Both... (full context)
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...they are both mentally ill: “Well, so we’ll bear it together.” Margarita is sure that Woland will fix everything for them. (full context)
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...Margarita is delighted to see him. As Margarita pours Azazello a cognac, he explains that Woland requests both the master and Margarita for a “little excursion.” Also knocking back a cognac,... (full context)
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Azazello gifts the couple a bottle of wine from Woland, which he says is the same wine that Pontius Pilate drank. They drink a toast... (full context)
Chapter 31. On Sparrow Hills
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...trace and a rainbow appears over Moscow. The master, Margarita, and Azazello join up with Woland, Koroviev, and Behemoth, who are also sitting on black horses. (full context)
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Woland instructs the master and Margarita to bid goodbye to Moscow. The master runs to the... (full context)
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Woland shouts “it’s time!” as the group rides up into the evening sky. Margarita looks behind... (full context)
Chapter 32. Forgiveness and Eternal Refuge
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Koroviev is now a “dark-violet knight.” Woland explains to Margarita that Koroviev once made a bad joke about “light and darkness” and... (full context)
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...arrival. Beside this man, who is staring up at the moon sits a dark dog. Woland explains to the master that the man is Pontius Pilate (with Banga). (full context)
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Woland tells the master that “your novel has been read” but “it is not finished.” Pilate... (full context)
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Woland explains that Pilate constantly repeats himself, saying that the moon gives him no peace, and... (full context)
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Margarita screams at Woland to let Pilate go. Woland laughs, causes stones to tumble down the mountains. He turns... (full context)
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...of moonlight reveals itself. Banga runs down the path, followed by the amazed Pontius Pilate. Woland turns to the master to discuss his fate; the master mistakenly thinks he has to... (full context)
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The master and Margarita walk down a path pointed at by Woland and bid him farewell. Woland and his entourage vanish. As the dawn rises, the lovers... (full context)
Epilogue
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The narrator describes what happens in Moscow in the aftermath of Woland’s visit. Rumors abound of “unclean powers,” which the “developed and cultured people” explain away as... (full context)
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Investigations continue. As well as Woland’s own victims, a number of black cats are exterminated by the police. A few citizens... (full context)
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...a children’s marionette theater, still afraid of the Variety. All of the characters who encountered Woland remain deeply affected by the experience. True to Woland’s prediction, Andrei Fokich dies of liver... (full context)
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...full moon, he sits at Patriarch Ponds, on the same bench as when he met Woland. He feels sure that he “fell victim to criminal and hypnotists and was afterwards treated... (full context)