The Mill on the Floss

The Mill on the Floss

by

George Eliot

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Mrs. Moss Character Analysis

Mrs. Moss is Mr. Tulliver’s impoverished sister. She has eight children, and the Dodsons think she has married “badly,” since her husband, Mr. Moss, is a poor farmer. She has borrowed a large sum of money from Mr. Tulliver, who thinks of asking for the money back when he needs it, though it would cause her family to lose their farm. However, Mr. Tulliver ultimately decides to allow her to keep the money and even destroys the note for the loan. Mrs. Moss reminds Mr. Tulliver of Maggie, and he hopes that by being kind to his sister, he will teach Tom to be kind to his own sister.

Mrs. Moss Quotes in The Mill on the Floss

The The Mill on the Floss quotes below are all either spoken by Mrs. Moss or refer to Mrs. Moss. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Memory and Childhood Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of The Mill on the Floss published in 2015.
Book 1, Chapter 8 Quotes

“Poor little wench! She’ll have nobody but Tom, belike, when I’m gone.”

Related Characters: Mr. Tulliver (speaker), Maggie Tulliver, Tom Tulliver, Mrs. Moss, Mr. Moss
Page Number: 79
Explanation and Analysis:
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Mrs. Moss Character Timeline in The Mill on the Floss

The timeline below shows where the character Mrs. Moss appears in The Mill on the Floss. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 8
Women’s Roles and Social Pressures Theme Icon
Mr. Tulliver arrives at the Moss family farm in Basset, a ramshackle and run-down parish. Mrs. Moss appears with a few of her eight children and inquires after Maggie, of whom she... (full context)
Women’s Roles and Social Pressures Theme Icon
Tolerance and Forgiveness  Theme Icon
...gone”—and feels pity for his own sister. He returns to the Moss farm and tells Mrs. Moss that he won’t be calling in the loan after all. Mrs. Moss thanks him and... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 2
Knowledge and Ignorance Theme Icon
Mrs. Tulliver tells Mrs. Moss that she has begged Mr. Tulliver not to “go to law” with Mr. Pivart. As... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 3
Tolerance and Forgiveness  Theme Icon
Just then, Mrs. Moss arrives. She tells the family that she is very sorry for her brother and wishes... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 4
Tolerance and Forgiveness  Theme Icon
Tom, Maggie, Mr. Glegg, and Mrs. Moss go upstairs to look through Mr. Tulliver’s chest and try to find the note for... (full context)
Tolerance and Forgiveness  Theme Icon
...from his and Maggie’s own savings, and to destroy the note for the loan to Mrs. Moss . The narrator observes that Tom is much sharper on matters like this than Latin... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 9
Memory and Childhood Theme Icon
Tolerance and Forgiveness  Theme Icon
...Consequently, that night, she tells Lucy that she has to leave to visit her aunt Mrs. Moss and then to take up a new position teaching at school. Lucy is hurt by... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 10
Memory and Childhood Theme Icon
Philip steals out to Maggie’s carriage before she leaves for Mrs. Moss ’s house. He asks her again why she has to go away, when it looks... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 11
Memory and Childhood Theme Icon
Tolerance and Forgiveness  Theme Icon
After Maggie has been at Mrs. Moss ’s for four days, Stephen arrives and asks to speak with her. They walk together... (full context)
Memory and Childhood Theme Icon
Knowledge and Ignorance Theme Icon
...up, if that’s what she wants, but asks for one kiss first. Maggie returns to Mrs. Moss ’s house in tears. She tells her aunt that she wishes she had died when... (full context)