The Moonstone

The Moonstone

Lady Julia Verinder Character Analysis

The wealthy noblewoman who presides over the Verinder estate and social circle at the center of the novel. Julia (née Herncastle) is mother to Miss Rachel Verinder, husband to the late Sir John Verinder, sister to John Herncastle and Caroline Ablewhite (among others), and the employer of Gabriel and Penelope Betteredge, Rosanna Spearman, and numerous other servants. Levelheaded, honest, widely respected, and deeply protective of her daughter, not to mention a much better manager of her estate than her husband ever was, Julia is the opposite of her vicious, immoral brother John Herncastle. While she tries to protect Rachel—for instance, by encouraging her daughter to safeguard the Moonstone in a locked cabinet, and later by firing Sergeant Cuff when he begins to suspect Rachel was involved in the theft—she also seeks for Rachel to become independent and allows her to make her own decisions. When she falls terminally ill during Miss Clack’s narrative, Julia spends her final days arranging Rachel’s future and fighting off Clack’s attempts to save her soul through religion.

Lady Julia Verinder Quotes in The Moonstone

The The Moonstone quotes below are all either spoken by Lady Julia Verinder or refer to Lady Julia Verinder. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Detective Methods and Genre Standards Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of The Moonstone published in 1999.
The Loss of the Diamond: 21 Quotes

I am (thank God!) constitutionally superior to reason. This enabled me to hold firm to my lady's view, which was my view also. This roused my spirit, and made me put a bold face on it before Sergeant Cuff. Profit, good friends, I beseech you, by my example. It will save you from many troubles of the vexing sort. Cultivate a superiority to reason, and see how you pare the claws of all the sensible people when they try to scratch you for your own good!

Page Number: 174
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Loss of the Diamond: 22 Quotes

“Her ladyship has smoothed matters over for the present very cleverly,” said the Sergeant. “But this family scandal is of the sort that bursts up again when you least expect it. We shall have more detective-business on our hands, sir, before the Moonstone is many months older.”

Related Symbols: The Moonstone
Page Number: 184
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Discovery of the Truth 1: 4 Quotes

“I'm afraid, Drusilla,” she said, “I must wait till I am a little better, before I can read that. The doctor—”
The moment she mentioned the doctor's name, I knew what was coming. Over and over again in my past experience among my perishing fellow-creatures, the members of the notoriously infidel profession of Medicine had stepped between me and my mission of mercy—on the miserable pretence that the patient wanted quiet, and that the disturbing influence of all others which they most dreaded, was the influence of Miss Clack and her Books. Precisely the same blinded materialism (working treacherously behind my back) now sought to rob me of the only right of property that my poverty could claim—my right of spiritual property in my perishing aunt.

Related Characters: Lady Julia Verinder (speaker), Miss Drusilla Clack (speaker)
Page Number: 232
Explanation and Analysis:
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Lady Julia Verinder Character Timeline in The Moonstone

The timeline below shows where the character Lady Julia Verinder appears in The Moonstone. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 1
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This division of the book is narrated by Gabriel Betteredge, who is the house-steward of Julia, Lady Verinder. He begins by citing the passage he discovered upon opening his copy of... (full context)
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In the morning, Mr. Franklin Blake ( Lady Verinder ’s nephew) tells Betteredge that the family lawyer, Mr. Bruff, thinks they should make a... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 2
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...Anyone “of the fashionable world” knows about “the three beautiful Miss Herncastles,” Adelaide, Caroline, and Julia. Betteredge explains that he began by working for their father, whose temper was notorious, and... (full context)
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...another’s way” all the time. He was glad when she died, Betteredge admits, and Lady Julia raised his only daughter, Penelope, to be the maid to her own only daughter, Miss... (full context)
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At Christmas in 1847, Betteredge recalls, Lady Julia gifted him a wool waistcoat for his 50 years of service. He was deeply grateful... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 3
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Betteredge begins on May 24, 1848, when Lady Julia informed him that Franklin Blake would be coming for a month after his return from... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 4
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...“sulky face.” Nancy complains about her tardy colleague Rosanna, whom Betteredge goes to retrieve. Lady Julia has employed Rosanna Spearman—who used to be a petty thief in London—after meeting her in... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 5
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...his explanation in his narrative—but warns the reader to pay close attention. He explains that Julia and her sisters also have two older brothers, Arthur (who inherited the family’s property) and... (full context)
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...up unexpectedly for Rachel’s birthday two years before Franklin’s return. He asked Betteredge to send Julia his best wishes, and Betteredge was frightened enough by his “devilish look” to comply. Julia... (full context)
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...has this conspiracy come to England, and is the Colonel using this conspiracy to scorn Julia? Betteredge is shocked and wonders if it was possible for their “quiet English house [to... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 6
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...in his testimony, which specifies that the Diamond will only be gifted to Rachel if Julia is still living—and that a copy of the will shall be given to Julia as... (full context)
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...he dodges the question. Franklin asks why Herncastle would leave the gem to Rachel, not Julia, and yet condition it on Julia being alive. Franklin sees both vengeance and repentance as... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 7
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...the younger Franklin, assuring her that they merely talked politics, and then to Rachel and Julia, whom he told that Franklin came and left simply because of his personal quirks. Penelope... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 8
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...of her cousins—Mr. Godfrey Ablewhite, with whom she seems enamored—to her birthday. Betteredge explains that Julia’s sister Caroline married an Ablewhite, who was “very rich and very respectable,” despite his low... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 9
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...he discovers Rachel holding the Diamond and the rest of the guests examining it ecstatically. Julia reads the will and, looking confused, asks Betteredge to talk with her in her room... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 10
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...the Diamond be divided up, as Herncastle had planned in the case of Rachel or Julia’s death. (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 11
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...the drawing-room, Rachel decides that she plans to safeguard the Diamond in her Indian cabinet. Julia protests that this cabinet does not have a lock and proposes that she take charge... (full context)
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...the Diamond has not fallen, and sends Penelope to fetch Rachel for questioning. However, only Julia comes out; she reports that Rachel is too “overwhelmed” to speak, and that the family... (full context)
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...were running around all night. After breakfast, he explains the story of the Indians to Julia, who remains “far more perturbed about her daughter [Rachel],” whose fixation on the Diamond was... (full context)
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Although Franklin, Godfrey, and Julia all probably know exactly what Rachel was yelling at Franklin about, none of them are... (full context)
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...that she will get herself into trouble with the police. Betteredge says he will tell Julia to rein in the foolishly pessimistic Rosanna. He soon discovers that she has fallen ill... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 12
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When Julia comes out, Cuff inquires about the previous investigation and asks to speak with Seegrave. After... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 13
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Julia protests that Betteredge should speak to Cuff for her, for her “nerves are a little... (full context)
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Julia again resists the prospect of searching the servants, which Cuff insists must happen (although he... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 14
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Outside, Betteredge meets Franklin, whom Julia has just updated about the day’s events and who declares in a frenzy that he... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 15
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...the last hour.” When they enter, Cuff is proven right: Rosanna has just returned, and Julia has been waiting to speak with Cuff for an hour. Betteredge is flabbergasted at Cuff’s... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 16
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Betteredge and Cuff walk into Julia’s room, and Julia explains that Rachel informed her about an hour ago about her desire... (full context)
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Julia asks Betteredge to inform Cuff that the three Indian jugglers are going to be released... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 17
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...thank Franklin, whom she promises to talk to, despite Betteredge’s attempts to send her to Julia instead. Betteredge thinks about calling Mr. Candy’s assistant, Mr. Ezra Jennings, to take a look... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 18
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...ignoring both Cuff and Mr. Franklin, who runs outside to bid her goodbye. Franklin asks Julia to let him return home, and she agrees—on the condition he talks with her first. (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 20
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When Betteredge returns to the house, the servants are panicking and Julia blames Cuff for Rosanna’s death, firing him on the spot—but he asks her to wait... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 21
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Julia apologizes to Cuff for her “inconsiderate manner” and Cuff explaining that he spent his whole... (full context)
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However, Julia finds it completely impossible that Rachel has lied to everyone and hidden the diamond; instead,... (full context)
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...to spy on her, and “mak[ing] an arrangement” with the money-lender whom she owes. Enraged, Julia rejects this idea. Cuff then proposes the “bold experiment”: tell Rachel about Rosanna’s death and,... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 22
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After Julia leaves the estate, Betteredge finds Cuff unwilling to keep talking about the case, and instead... (full context)
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The carriage returns without Julia, who has decided to remain in town, but with two letters—one for Franklin and one... (full context)
The Loss of the Diamond: Gabriel Betteredge: Chapter 23
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Betteredge recounts Franklin’s decision to leave the estate after receiving his letter from Julia, which was largely the same as the one Betteredge received, but included an addendum concerning... (full context)
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...for the servants, directing them to bring some clothing to Frizinghall so that Rachel and Julia can bring it with them to London. Betteredge writes to ask Franklin’s whereabouts, and the... (full context)
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The next day, Betteredge receives two letters: one from Penelope confirming that Rachel and Julia reached London, and another from one of Franklin’s father’s servants, explaining that Franklin went directly... (full context)
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...also hanging out with Godfrey. And surprisingly, Miss Clack has not yet shown up on Julia’s doorstep—which is important only because Betteredge has learned that her narrative will be the next... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: First Narrative: Miss Clack: Chapter 1
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Miss Clack has grown poor and distant from Julia’s side of the family. Living retired in Brittany, she mostly keeps to herself—but then, all... (full context)
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Clack’s involvement with the Moonstone mystery begins on July 3rd, 1848, when she passes Julia Verinder’s house in London, notices it is occupied, and decides to knock. She learns that... (full context)
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At lunch with Julia and Rachel Verinder the day after her visit to their house, Miss Clack is astonished... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: First Narrative: Miss Clack: Chapter 2
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...declares that Godfrey entered “exactly at the right time,” the correct distance behind his servant. Julia calls for Rachel, and Godfrey proclaims that the women should not worry about him because... (full context)
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...his “lady-worshippers,” she plans to make him answer specific questions. Miss Clack is surprised that Julia simply sits and tolerates Rachel’s behavior, especially as she brings Godfrey to a chair by... (full context)
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...Clack’s delight—to “take up the cause of all oppressed people.” Rachel rejects his plea and Julia reprimands her, but also encourages Godfrey to answer her questions. (full context)
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...a flower-show. Before she leaves, Rachel asks her mom—tastelessly enough—if she has been “distressed,” and Julia kindly insists that she has not. Miss Clack attempts to confront the tearful Rachel on... (full context)
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...eyes, he is gone. To fill the time, Clack—who reveals her first name is Drusilla—asks Julia about her health, but Julia responds that this is a “very distressing subject.” Clack gets... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: First Narrative: Miss Clack: Chapter 3
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Julia reveals to Clack that, for a long while, she has been “seriously ill […] without... (full context)
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Clack is thrilled: Julia’s news offers her a “career of usefulness,” namely the opportunity to save Julia through Christianity.... (full context)
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When she returns to the Verinder residence, Clack finds Julia is busy with the doctor, and is asked to wait with Mr. Bruff, the lawyer,... (full context)
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Before Clack can again chastise and contradict Bruff, the servant announces that Julia is ready for them. Clack explains that she has summarized their conversation because it reveals... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: First Narrative: Miss Clack: Chapter 4
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Julia quickly signs the will and Clack scares Bruff out of the room with her bag... (full context)
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The next day, Clack returns to the Verinders’ London house and learns that Julia, in her illness, is at home while the rest of the family is supposedly at... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: First Narrative: Miss Clack: Chapter 5
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...in the library,” he explains. Furious, Clack moves the curtains so she can see into Julia’s room as well as hear the conversation. Godfrey tells Rachel she is being missed at... (full context)
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...eyes “just one moment too late.” Godfrey asks Rachel which of them should speak to Julia, and she insists they wait until Julia recovers from her illness. (full context)
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...“a man in great alarm” comes to the steps and calls for Rachel, reporting that Julia fainted and will not recover. Clack escapes downstairs and Godfrey tells her to go help... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: First Narrative: Miss Clack: Chapter 6
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...Clack attempts to include some of her religious pamphlets as addenda to her narrative of Julia’s death, Blake sends back the pamphlets because they are irrelevant to her narrative. Clack promises... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: First Narrative: Miss Clack: Chapter 7
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...foregoing correspondence” forces her to simply move on with her story rather than dwelling on Julia’s death. Clack met Rachel a month after Julia’s death and witnessed an important development in... (full context)
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Clack decides not to attend Julia’s funeral, both because she is too distraught and because she dislikes the “clerical castaway” in... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: Second Narrative: Mathew Bruff: Chapter 1
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...then he returned to his nap. Although Bruff would ordinarily object to this, he knew Julia was trustworthy and competent in business (unlike almost all other women, he remarks). And, indeed,... (full context)
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A few weeks after Julia signs her second will, Bruff receives news that someone from the firm Skipp and Smalley... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: Second Narrative: Mathew Bruff: Chapter 3
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...was headed by getting a copy of Colonel Herncastle’s will and learning everything possible about Julia Verinder and Franklin Blake. Since it would likely be easier for them to seize the... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: Third Narrative: Franklin Blake: Chapter 1
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...his own house, Rachel never once mentioned Franklin’s name. Franklin takes out the letter that Julia wrote him after he left Frizinghall, in which she explained that Franklin’s assistance in the... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: Third Narrative: Franklin Blake: Chapter 6
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...“a foreigner and a stranger” visited him. They had come to collect a debt, which Julia readily paid off when she heard the collectors arguing heatedly with Franklin in the next... (full context)
The Discovery of the Truth: Fifth Narrative: Franklin Blake
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...of making a mistake.” He has come to reconsider the case, “in grateful remembrance of” Julia’s generous check (although he will refuse further payment). (full context)