The character of Dr. James Sheppard in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

Dr. James Sheppard is the narrator of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. As a result, avid mystery readers—both now and especially in the 1920s—would be predisposed to trust him. In detective novels, there’s a long tradition, stretching back to the Sherlock Holmes stories (narrated by the reliable Dr. Watson), in which the narrator of the story is the most trustworthy character—the detective’s right-hand man. However, in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Agatha Christie challenges readers’ assumptions about narration and the conventions of the mystery novel, and in the final pages of the book it’s revealed that Dr. Sheppard is the murderer. Sheppard is a somewhat peculiar character: although he’s the narrator of the book, readers learn a surprisingly small amount about him (the “twist ending” is dependent upon readers not learning too much about him, after all). Sheppard is a physician, and appears to be reliable, trustworthy, and altogether likeable—hence, we assume, Poirot’s apparent friendship with him. In retrospect, however, Christie makes it clear that Dr. Sheppard is a weak, desperate man who, as a result of his bad investments and desire to save face, blackmails Mrs. Ferrars and is then forced to murder his friend Roger Ackroyd to prevent himself from being exposed.

Dr. James Sheppard Quotes in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

The The Murder of Roger Ackroyd quotes below are all either spoken by Dr. James Sheppard or refer to Dr. James Sheppard. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the William Morrow edition of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd published in 2011.
Chapter 2 Quotes

Our village, King's Abbot, is, I imagine, very much like any other village. Our big town is Cranchester, nine miles away. We have a large railway station, a small post office, and two rival “General Stores.” Able-bodied men are apt to leave the place early in life, but we are rich in unmarried ladies and retired military officers. Our hobbies and recreations can be summed up in the one word, “gossip.”

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker)
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:
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One cannot answer a question like that off-hand. I gave her a short lecture on the subject, and she listened with close attention. I still suspected her of seeking information about Mrs. Ferrars.
"Now, Veronal, for instance—" I proceeded.
But, strangely enough, she didn't seem interested in Veronal. Instead she changed the subject, and asked me if it was true that there were certain poisons so rare as to baffle detection.

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Miss Elizabeth Russell, Mrs. Ferrars
Page Number: 14
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 3 Quotes

"It is Fate," he said at last.
"What is Fate?" I asked irritably.
"That I should live next to a man who seriously considers Porcupine Oilfields, and also West Australian Gold Mines. Tell me, have you also a penchant for auburn hair?"

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Hercule Poirot (“Mr. Porrot”)
Page Number: 21
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 4 Quotes

"Make certain that window's closed, will you," he asked. Somewhat surprised, I got up and went to it. It was not a french window, but one of the ordinary sash type. The heavy blue velvet curtains were drawn in front of it, but the window itself was open at the top.
Parker reentered the room with my bag while I was still at the window.
"That's all right," I said, emerging again into the room.
"You've put the latch across?"
"Yes, yes … What's the matter with you, Ackroyd?"

Related Characters: Roger Ackroyd (speaker), Dr. James Sheppard
Page Number: 37
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The letter had been brought in at twenty minutes to nine. It was just on ten minutes to nine when I left him, the letter still unread. I hesitated with my hand on the door handle, looking back and wondering if there was anything I had left undone. I could think of nothing. With a shake of the head I passed out and closed the door behind me.

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker)
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 6 Quotes

"You don't think that Parker himself might be the man we're after?" I suggested.
"It looks very like it. He was obviously listening at the door when you came out. Then Miss Ackroyd came across him later bent on entering the study. Say he tried again when she was safely out of the way. He stabbed Ackroyd, locked the door on the inside, opened the window, and got out that way, and went round to a side door which he had previously left open. How's that?"

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Inspector Davis (speaker), John Parker
Page Number: 63
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Chapter 8 Quotes

He looked ridiculously full of his own importance. It crossed my mind to wonder whether he was really any good as a detective. Had his big reputation been built up on a series of lucky chances?

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Hercule Poirot (“Mr. Porrot”)
Page Number: 92
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 9 Quotes

"Look inside," commanded Poirot.
I did so. Inside was an inscription in fine writing:
From R., March 13th.

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Hercule Poirot (“Mr. Porrot”) (speaker)
Page Number: 110
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Chapter 10 Quotes

"I’m not too flush just now, as a matter of fact. Came into a legacy a year ago, and like a fool let myself be persuaded into putting it into some wild-cat scheme."
I sympathized, and narrated my own similar trouble.

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Major Hector Blunt (speaker), Major Hector Blunt
Page Number: 115-16
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 13 Quotes

“It is a theory that,” admitted Poirot. “Decidedly you have cells of a kind. But it leaves a good deal unaccounted for.”
“Such as—”
“The telephone call, the pushed-out chair—“

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Hercule Poirot (“Mr. Porrot”) (speaker)
Related Symbols: “Little Grey Cells”
Page Number: 153
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Chapter 15 Quotes

"'What was the point of that question about the glasses?" I asked curiously.
Poirot shrugged his shoulders. "One must say something," he remarked. "That particular question did as well as any other."

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Hercule Poirot (“Mr. Porrot”) (speaker), John Parker
Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 16 Quotes

It was then that I went on, goaded by Caroline's gibes, and rendered reckless by my triumph.
“And as to anything interesting,” I said. “What about a gold wedding ring with a date and ‘From R.’ inside.”

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Caroline Sheppard
Related Symbols: Mah Jong
Page Number: 187
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 20 Quotes

It occurred to me that there was not much which escaped Hercule Poirot.

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Hercule Poirot (“Mr. Porrot”)
Page Number: 233
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 22 Quotes

“It says that Ralph has been arrested. So everything is useless. I need not pretend any longer.”
“Newspaper paragraphs are not always true, mademoiselle,” murmured Poirot, having the grace to look ashamed of himself, “All the same, I think you will do well to make a clean breast of things. The truth is what we need now.”

Page Number: 244
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Chapter 23 Quotes

“I congratulate you—on your modesty!”
“Oh!” I said, rather taken aback.
“And on your reticence,” he added.

I said “Oh!” again.

“Not so did Hastings write,” continued my friend. “On every page, many, many times was the word ‘I’. What he thought—what he did. But you—you have kept your personality in the background; only once or twice does it obtrude—in scenes of home life, shall we say?”

Related Characters: Dr. James Sheppard (speaker), Hercule Poirot (“Mr. Porrot”)
Page Number: 255
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 24 Quotes

I invent a nephew with mental trouble. I consult Mademoiselle Sheppard as to suitable homes. She gives me the names of two near Cranchester to which her brother has sent patients. I make inquiries. Yes, at one of them a patient was brought there by the doctor himself early on Saturday morning.

Page Number: 268
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 25 Quotes

“A person who was at the Three Boars earlier that day, a person who knew Ackroyd well enough to know that he had purchased a dictaphone, a person who was of a mechanical turn of mind, who had the opportunity to take the dagger from the silver table before Miss Flora arrived, who had with him a receptacle suitable for hiding the dictaphone—such as a black bag—and who had the study to himself for a few minutes after the crime was discovered while Parker was telephoning for the police. In fact—Dr. Sheppard!”

Page Number: 278
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 26 Quotes

Remember what I said—the truth goes to Inspector Raglan in the morning. But, for the sake of your good sister, I am willing to give you the chance of another way out. There might be, for instance, an overdose of a sleeping draught.

Page Number: 282
Explanation and Analysis:
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Dr. James Sheppard Character Timeline in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

The timeline below shows where the character Dr. James Sheppard appears in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Dr. Sheppard at the Breakfast Table
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Dr. James Sheppard, the narrator, notes that a woman named Mrs. Ferrars has died. In the morning he... (full context)
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Caroline is a talkative woman, and Dr. Sheppard knows that whatever he tells her about Mrs. Ferrars’ death will soon be common knowledge... (full context)
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Caroline informs Dr. Sheppard that she already knows Mrs. Ferrars is dead—Annie the parlormaid told her. Dr. Sheppard explains... (full context)
Chapter 2: Who’s Who in King’s Abbot
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Dr. Sheppard lives in the village of King’s Abbot, miles away from the nearest big town. There’s... (full context)
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Roger Ackroyd is a successful, middle-aged manufacturer of (Dr. Sheppard thinks) wagon wheels. He’s red-faced, genial, and very likeable. When Roger was younger, he married... (full context)
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...Ackroyd, the widow of Roger’s “ne’er do-well younger brother” Cecil Ackroyd, and her daughter. Dr. Sheppard notes that it was to Mrs. Ackroyd’s advantage that Roger remain unmarried, since she depended... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard tries to understand Mrs. Ferrars’ death. If she’d killed herself, he thinks, she would have... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard crosses paths with Roger Ackroyd in the street. Roger seems “a … wreck of his... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard proceeds to tend to his patients. At lunch, Miss Russell comes to see him. She’s... (full context)
Chapter 3: The Man Who Grew Vegetable Marrows
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At lunch, Dr. Sheppard tells Caroline that he’ll be dining with Roger Ackroyd that night. Caroline says that Ralph... (full context)
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At lunch, Dr. Sheppard thinks about the foreigner who has moved in next door. His name is “Mr. Porrott,”... (full context)
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That afternoon, Sheppard is working in his garden when a vegetable marrow (a kind of squash) whizzes by... (full context)
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Mr. Porrott explains to Dr. Sheppard that he’s come to live in the village because his old friend—an honest, occasionally foolish... (full context)
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Mr. Porrott asks Dr. Sheppard if he can name someone, based on Porrott’s description: dark hair, very handsome. Sheppard immediately... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard leaves Mr. Porrott and goes inside his house; Caroline has just come home. She tells... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard decides to go to the Three Boars inn, where he expects to find Ralph. Sheppard... (full context)
Chapter 4: Dinner at Fernly
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A little before 7:30 pm, Dr. Sheppard arrives at Roger Ackroyd’s estate, known as Fernly. The butler, Parker, lets Sheppard inside, where... (full context)
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Inside the drawing room, Sheppard finds Miss Russell, who’s breathing hard. Russell says she didn’t expect Sheppard for dinner, and... (full context)
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...enters. She’s a beautiful young woman, though many people dislike her. Flora proudly shows Dr. Sheppard her engagement ring, which Ralph gave her a month previously. Flora and Ralph announced their... (full context)
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At dinner, Dr. Sheppard sits next to Mrs. Ackroyd and Flora Ackroyd. Dinner is tense, and Roger Ackroyd seems... (full context)
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When Parker has brought Dr. Sheppard’s bag and left, Roger begins to speak openly. He says he’s “in hell” and that... (full context)
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Roger goes on to explain to Dr. Sheppard that he asked Mrs. Ferrars to marry him three months ago, but she refused. Yesterday,... (full context)
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...with the mail and leaves. Roger finds an envelope from Mrs. Ferrars. He asks Dr. Sheppard again if he shut the window, and Sheppard insists that he has. Roger explains that... (full context)
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Around 8:50 pm, some ten minutes after the letter arrived, Dr. Sheppard leaves the study, “the letter still unread.” Sheppard tries to think if there’s anything he’s... (full context)
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Around ten o’clock, when Dr. Sheppard is in bed, the phone rings. He shouts to Caroline that it’s Parker: Roger Ackroyd... (full context)
Chapter 5: Murder
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Having heard the news of Roger Ackroyd’s murder, Dr. Sheppard drives over to the Ackroyd house. Parker lets him in, and Sheppard demands to know... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard asks to see Roger Ackroyd, just to be sure that he’s all right. Parker leads... (full context)
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The village inspector arrives, accompanied by a constable. He asks about the body, and Dr. Sheppard explains that he was summoned by a call. He also notes that Roger Ackroyd has... (full context)
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The inspector tries to determine the exact time of death. He asks Dr. Sheppard about Roger Ackroyd, and Sheppard recalls leaving around 8:50. Raymond recalls hearing Ackroyd’s voice from... (full context)
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...Blunt goes to Flora and tells her, gently, that Roger’s been killed. Flora faints. Dr. Sheppard and Major Blunt carry her upstairs to bed. (full context)
Chapter 6: The Tunisian Dagger
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Dr. Sheppard has just brought Flora Ackroyd to her room. Coming downstairs, he speaks to the inspector.... (full context)
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The inspector, whose name is Davis, brings Dr. Sheppard to the study to ask him more questions. He asks Sheppard about blackmail—a possibility that... (full context)
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...he asks Parker’s “opinion of a small pocket diary.” Raymond, realizing what this means, tells Sheppard that Parker is clearly a suspect. He suggests that they donate their fingerprints to Davis.... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard returns to his home, where Caroline is waiting. He doesn’t mention the blackmailing, but tells... (full context)
Chapter 7: I Learn My Neighbor’s Profession
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The next morning Dr. Sheppard goes to work, and returns in the afternoon. Caroline informs him that Flora Ackroyd wants... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard and Flora go to visit Hercule Poirot. Poirot has heard about the murder, and offers... (full context)
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Poirot then asks Sheppard to explain what he knows about the case. Sheppard explains the events of the previous... (full context)
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Poirot suggests that he and Dr. Sheppard go to the police. There, Sheppard introduces Poirot to Inspector Davis, and meets Colonel Melrose,... (full context)
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Inspector Raglan informs Poirot and Dr. Sheppard that he’s tested the fingerprints on the knife blade—they don’t belong to Sheppard, Raymond, or... (full context)
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Poirot goes with Melrose and Dr. Sheppard to examine the study, which the police haven’t disturbed. Poirot asks how the room appeared... (full context)
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Poirot tells Dr. Sheppard something he’s noticed during his career: in all cases, all the suspects have something to... (full context)
Chapter 8: Inspector Raglan Is Confident
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Immediately following the events of the last chapter, Dr. Sheppard stands in Roger Ackroyd’s home. The call he received last night was from King’s Abbot... (full context)
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...Poirot asks both men if Ackroyd had received any unexpected visitors, like the one Dr. Sheppard saw on his way home last night, in the last week. Parker recalls a salesman... (full context)
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...concludes that Ralph Paton is the prime suspect—he must have made the call to Dr. Sheppard from the station. Poirot asks why Ralph would call Dr. Sheppard, and Raglan can only... (full context)
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...of Ralph’s shoes before he entered the house. As they walk by, Poirot tells Dr. Sheppard that God must have sent Sheppard to replace Poirot’s friend Hastings. Poirot and Sheppard then... (full context)
Chapter 9: The Goldfish Pond
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Poirot and Dr. Sheppard walk back from the summerhouse. By this time Inspector Raglan has gone. Poirot studies Ackroyd’s... (full context)
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Poirot and Dr. Sheppard then walk to a small goldfish pond. There, they notice Flora and Major Blunt. Flora... (full context)
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 Poirot and Dr. Sheppard emerge from where they’ve been eavesdropping, and greet Flora and Major Blunt. Poirot asks Blunt... (full context)
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...the dagger, and she insists that, when she looked at the silver table with Dr. Sheppard, the dagger wasn’t there. Flora further points out that Inspector Raglan doesn’t believe her story—he... (full context)
Chapter 10: The Parlormaid
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Inside the house, Dr. Sheppard, Poirot, Flora, and Major Blunt meet Mr. Hammond, who’s been speaking with Mrs. Ackroyd. Mrs.... (full context)
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Poirot then pulls Dr. Sheppard aside and gives him instructions: he wants Sheppard to bring up the name of Mrs.... (full context)
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At lunch, Mrs. Ackroyd tells Dr. Sheppard that she’s hurt about being left only 10,000 pounds. She adds that Roger Ackroyd admired... (full context)
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...unlocked desk drawer. Inspector Raglan, who’s in the house asking more questions, goes with Raymond, Sheppard, and Poirot to search the desk. The money is still in the desk but, much... (full context)
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In the housekeeper’s room, Inspector Raglan, Dr. Sheppard, and Poirot speak with Miss Russell about Elsie Dale. Russell explains that Elsie would never... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard wonders if any of the papers on Roger’s desk contained important information—this might explain why... (full context)
Chapter 11: Poirot Pays a Call
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The next day, Dr. Sheppard goes to Marby by himself to learn about Ursula Bourne. Mrs. Folliot, the lady of... (full context)
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Back at home, Caroline informs Dr. Sheppard that Poirot has dropped by. He talked about his “little grey cells,” and asked Caroline... (full context)
Chapter 12: Round the Table
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At the inquest, Dr. Sheppard presents his evidence about the time and cause of Roger Ackroyd’s death. The coroner notes,... (full context)
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...held the dagger—which would suggest that the killer was either Ralph or the stranger Dr. Sheppard saw. Suddenly, Poirot asks Inspector Raglan if he checked Roger Ackroyd’s fingerprints, and suggests that... (full context)
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Poirot proposes to Dr. Sheppard that they meet with the “family.” Later that day, they meet in the Ackroyd house... (full context)
Chapter 13: The Goose Quill
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That evening, Dr. Sheppard goes to Poirot’s home for dinner. Poirot asks about Caroline, and Sheppard demands to know... (full context)
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Poirot, noticing that Sheppard is impatient, says that Sheppard is like “the little child who wants to know the... (full context)
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Suddenly Poirot produces the quill that he found in the summerhouse. Dr. Sheppard remembers having heard about Canadians and Americans who consume heroin in such a way. Poirot... (full context)
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Poirot asks Dr. Sheppard for his thoughts. Dr. Sheppard produces a scrap of paper on which he’s jotted some... (full context)
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Poirot also wants to know what Dr. Sheppard thinks of the motive for murder. Sheppard points out that money could be a motive—Ralph... (full context)
Chapter 14: Mrs. Ackroyd
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After Dr. Sheppard’s conversation with Poirot, he begins to see how much information Poirot has concealed. He showed... (full context)
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On Tuesday, Mrs. Ackroyd summons Dr. Sheppard to examine her. She claims that she’s “prostrated” by the horror of Roger’s death—a claim... (full context)
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Mrs. Ackroyd proceeds to explain to Dr. Sheppard that she’s had “many bills,” some of which she didn’t show to Roger. On the... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard leaves to speak to Ursula Bourne. He tells her that he knows she wanted to... (full context)
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When Dr. Sheppard comes home, his sister tells him that Poirot asked her to determine if Ralph Paton’s... (full context)
Chapter 15: Geoffrey Raymond
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The afternoon after he sees Mrs. Ackroyd, Dr. Sheppard comes home, and Caroline informs him that Geoffrey Raymond has left—he was looking for Poirot.... (full context)
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At Poirot’s house, Sheppard presents Poirot with the jam and tells him about his conversation with Mrs. Ackroyd. Poirot... (full context)
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Poirot asks Sheppard about his appointment with Miss Russell. Sheppard tells Poirot that, after the confidential portion of... (full context)
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...therefore has nothing to worry about. With these words, Raymond leaves, smiling. Alone, Poirot tells Sheppard that he trusts Raymond’s explanation—although, if Raymond didn’t have an alibi, Poirot might be suspicious.... (full context)
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Sheppard suggests that Roger Ackroyd’s killer wasn’t Mrs. Ferrars’s blackmailer. Poirot agrees, suggesting that Parker may... (full context)
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At Fernly, Poirot and Sheppard greet Flora, and Poirot tells her that they’re going to test Parker’s innocence. Poirot then... (full context)
Chapter 16: An Evening at Mah Jong
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The night after the previous chapter, Sheppard and Caroline play Mah Jong with two gossipy friends, Colonel Carter and Miss Gannett. As... (full context)
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Colonel Carter and Miss Gannett now ask Dr. Sheppard for his own theories about the murder, but Sheppard claims that Poirot hasn’t shared any... (full context)
Chapter 17: Parker
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The next morning, Dr. Sheppard realizes that, due to the “exhilaration” of having a perfect Mah Jong hand, he’s been... (full context)
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At Fernly, Poirot and Dr. Sheppard greet Parker. Poirot asks Parker if he’s ever blackmailed someone, and Parker becomes very offended.... (full context)
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Alone, Poirot tells Dr. Sheppard that he believes Parker: Parker wasn’t the killer, and he sincerely thought that Roger Ackroyd,... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard and Poirot visit Mr. Hammond to inquire about Mrs. Ferrars. Sheppard recaps his conversation with... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard invites Poirot to his home. There, Caroline asks Poirot if he’s found Ralph Paton in... (full context)
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Just then, the phone rings, and Dr. Sheppard answers it: the police have detained a man, Charles Kent, in Liverpool. He’s believed to... (full context)
Chapter 18: Charles Kent
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In Liverpool, Dr. Sheppard and Poirot meet with Inspector Raglan, who wants Sheppard to identify Charles Kent. When Raglan... (full context)
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Raglan brings Dr. Sheppard and Poirot to meet Charles Kent. Kent is a young man, and as Sheppard stares... (full context)
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Alone, Poirot, Raglan, and Dr. Sheppard discuss the possibility that Charles Kent was the blackmailer. However, Raglan insists that Kent couldn’t... (full context)
Chapter 19: Flora Ackroyd
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The next morning, Dr. Sheppard finishes his work and finds Inspector Raglan waiting outside his home. Raglan has confirmed Charles... (full context)
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Raglan and Dr. Sheppard visit Poirot, and Poirot listens patiently to Raglan’s news. He tells Raglan not to release... (full context)
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Inspector Raglan, Dr. Sheppard, and Poirot agree to speak to Flora. At Fernly, they find Flora with Major Hector... (full context)
Chapter 20: Miss Russell
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Dr. Sheppard returns to his office and later goes home. There, Caroline tells him that Poirot is... (full context)
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Poirot and Dr. Sheppard leave for Sheppard’s office, where they find Miss Russell. Poirot informs Russell that Charles Kent... (full context)
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Miss Russell leaves the room, and Dr. Sheppard tells Poirot that her testimony suggests that Ralph Paton is the murderer. Poirot reveals that... (full context)
Chapter 21: The Paragraph in the Paper
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Dr. Sheppard leaves his office and returns to Caroline, who insists that Miss Russell must know more... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard goes off to the Ackroyd house to invite everyone. Inside, he finds Mrs. Ackroyd, who... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard rejoins Poirot and walks home, where they find Caroline, who tells them that Ursula Bourne... (full context)
Chapter 22: Ursula’s Story
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Ursula proceeds to tell Dr. Sheppard, Caroline, and Poirot what she’s been hiding. While working as a parlormaid for the Ackroyds,... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard listens carefully to Ursula’s story, and realizes why she kept silent: had she told the... (full context)
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...assuming that Ursula had done it. She also explains that she went to see Dr. Sheppard, assuming that Sheppard might know Ralph’s whereabouts and pass on her message to Ralph. Sheppard... (full context)
Chapter 23: Poirot’s Little Reunion
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When Ursula and Caroline are out of the room, Dr. Sheppard tells Poirot that the case against Ralph Paton is looking strong. Poirot agrees, and mentions... (full context)
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A while later, Poirot finishes the manuscript and compliments Dr. Sheppard on his modesty. He says that while Hastings made himself a main character in his... (full context)
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In Poirot’s home, Dr. Sheppard sees that he’s arranged the guests’ chairs so that they’re bathed in bright light, leaving... (full context)
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...began his investigation with the shoeprints on the windowsill of Roger Ackroyd’s study, with Dr. Sheppard as his aid. He says he searched the summerhouse at Fernly, where he found starched... (full context)
Chapter 24: Ralph Paton’s Story
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Ralph Paton stands beside Ursula, smiling at Dr. Sheppard. Poirot points at Sheppard and says, “Have I not told you at least thirty-six times... (full context)
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Poirot reveals that he’d been suspicious of Dr. Sheppard ever since he learned that Sheppard visited Ralph on the night of the murder. Sheppard... (full context)
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Poirot explains that Dr. Sheppard hid Ralph in a nursing home for the mentally ill. Poirot tested his theory by... (full context)
Chapter 25: The Whole Truth
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Still no one confesses, and eventually the guests head home, but Poirot gestures for Dr. Sheppard to remain behind. Alone, Poirot asks Dr. Sheppard what he thought of the evening, and... (full context)
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Poirot says he began by considering Dr. Sheppard’s telephone call: if Ralph Paton had really been the murderer, then there would have been... (full context)
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...There were four people at the scene of the crime before the police arrived: Dr. Sheppard, Major Blunt, Raymond, and Parker. Parker had nothing to gain by calling—he would have been... (full context)
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So the murderer, Poirot now tells Dr. Sheppard, must have been at the Three Boars earlier in the day to steal Ralph’s shoes.... (full context)
Chapter 26: And Nothing But the Truth
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Poirot has just accused Dr. Sheppard of killing Roger Ackroyd. Dr. Sheppard laughs and says that Poirot is insane. Poirot then... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard protests that he had nothing to gain by killing Roger Ackroyd. On the contrary, Poirot... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard tells Poirot that he’s weary of Poirot’s lecture. However, Poirot reminds Sheppard that he’ll tell... (full context)
Chapter 27: Apologia
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It’s 5 a.m., and Dr. Sheppard has just finished his manuscript. He pities Roger Ackroyd, and wishes Roger had read the... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard says that he used a dagger to kill Roger Ackroyd as an afterthought. He’d brought... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard says he is proud of himself for misleading readers, particularly when describing the time of... (full context)
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Dr. Sheppard must now contemplate his “way out.” To save Caroline from the truth, he says, he’ll... (full context)