The Nibelungenlied

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Anonymous

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Siegfried Character Analysis

Siegfried is the prince of the Netherlands, son of Siegmund and Sieglind. He is a handsome knight famed for his valiant exploits. He falls in love with Kriemhild from a distance, long before he ever lays eyes on her, and resolves to go to Burgundy to woo her. Among Siegfried’s youthful conquests are the princes of Nibelungenland, Schilbung and Nibelung, whom Siegfried slayed and whose massive treasure and kingdom he seized. He also slayed a dragon and bathed in its blood, which makes him virtually invincible. When he arrives at Worms, he declares his intention to seize Burgundy by force, but eventually agrees to share its wealth with Gunther and his brothers. When Liudeger and Liudegast invade, Siegfried offers to fight them on Gunther’s behalf and leads Gunther’s vassals in victorious battle, earning the Burgundians’ trust. At the festival following the battle, Siegfried is finally allowed to meet Kriemhild. When Gunther is determined to woo Iceland’s Queen Brunhild, Siegfried sails with him and defeats Brunhild in her contests, wearing his invisibility cloak, so that Gunther appears to be the victor. After they return from Iceland, Gunther fulfills a vow to give him Kriemhild in exchange for his help, and they marry at last. Gunther again asks for his help in subduing a resistant Brunhild in Gunther’s bedchamber. After the wedding festivities, Siegfried and Kriemhild return to the Netherlands, where Siegmund grants him the kingdom, and he reigns peacefully for ten years. When they return to Worms for a festival, Brunhild accuses him of having slept with her, and Hagen hatches a plan to avenge Brunhild’s honor. Siegfried is accordingly stabbed in the back by Hagen during a hunting trip and quickly dies. The widowed Kriemhild becomes obsessed with revenge.

Siegfried Quotes in The Nibelungenlied

The The Nibelungenlied quotes below are all either spoken by Siegfried or refer to Siegfried. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Idealized and Deviant Womanhood Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of The Nibelungenlied published in 1969.
Chapter 1 Quotes

Kriemhild dreamt she reared a falcon, strong, handsome and wild, but that two eagles rent it while she perforce looked on, the most grievous thing that could ever befall her. She told her dream to her mother Uote, who could give the good maiden no better reading than this: “The falcon you are rearing is a noble man who, unless God preserve him, will soon be taken from you.”

“Why do you talk to me of a man, dear Mother? I intend to stay free of a warrior’s love all my life. I mean to keep my beauty till I die, and never be made wretched by the love of any man. […] There are many examples of women who have paid for happiness with sorrow in the end. I shall avoid both, and so I shall come to no harm.”

Related Characters: Kriemhild (speaker), Uote (speaker), Siegfried
Page Number: 18
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3 Quotes

In the days that followed, Siegfried was a most welcome guest among the Burgundians, and, believe me, he was honoured by them for his manly courage a thousand times more than I can tell you, so that none could see him and harbour any grudge against him. […] And whenever gay knights were passing the time with the ladies and displaying their good breeding, people were glad to see him, for he aspired to a noble love. Whatever the company undertook, Siegfried was ready to join in. Meanwhile he cherished a lovely girl in his heart and was cherished in return by this same young lady whom he had never seen but who in her own intimate circle nevertheless often spoke kindly of him.

Related Characters: Kriemhild, Siegfried
Page Number: 31
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

Siegfried left the maiden lying there and stepped aside as through to remove his clothes and, without the noble Queen’s noticing it, he drew a golden ring from her finger and then took her girdle, a splendid orphrey. I do not know whether it was his pride which made him do it. Later he gave them to his wife, and well did he rue it!

Related Characters: Kriemhild, Gunther, Siegfried, Brunhild
Related Symbols: Clothes
Page Number: 93
Explanation and Analysis:

And now Gunther and the lovely girl lay together, and he took his pleasure with her as was his due, so that she had to resign her maiden shame and anger. But from his intimacy she grew somewhat pale, for at love’s coming her vast
strength fled so that now she was no stronger than anyother woman. Gunther had his delight of her lovely body, and had she renewed her resistance what good could it have done her? His loving had reduced her to this.

And now how very tenderly and amorously Brunhild lay beside him till the bright dawn!

Related Characters: Gunther, Siegfried, Brunhild
Related Symbols: Dawn
Page Number: 93
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 14 Quotes

“Whom are you calling a paramour?” asked the Queen.

“I call you one,” answered Kriemhild. “My dear husband Siegfried was the first to enjoy your lovely body, since it was not my brother who took your maidenhead. Where were your poor wits? - It was a vile trick. - Seeing that he is your vassal, why did you let him love you? Your complaints have no foundation.”

“I swear I shall tell Gunther of this,” replied Brunhild.

“What is that to me? Your arrogance has got the better of you. You used words that made me your servant, and, believe me, in all sincerity I shall always be sorry you did so.”

Related Characters: Kriemhild (speaker), Brunhild (speaker), Gunther, Siegfried
Page Number: 114
Explanation and Analysis:

“How could the thing be done?” asked King Gunther. “I will tell you,” replied Hagen. “We shall send envoys to ourselves here in Burgundy to declare war on us publicly, men whom no one knows. Then you will announce in the hearing of your guests that you and your men plan to go campaigning, whereupon Siegfried will promise you his aid, and so he will lose his life. For in this way I shall learn the brave man’s secret from his wife.”

The King followed his vassal Hagen’s advice, to evil effect, and those rare knights began to set afoot the great betrayal before any might discover it, so that, thanks to the wrangling of two women, countless warriors met their doom.

After Hagen learns of Kriemhild’s charge that Brunhild slept with Siegfried, he wastes no time beginning to plot Siegfried’s death. After winning over the other Burgundians and even the weak Gunther to his view, he explains his plan to discover Siegfried’s vulnerability. It’s striking that he uses the device of a military engagement to bring about the betrayal. Siegfried initially won the Burgundians’ trust by offering to fight off invaders for them; now, Hagen and the others betray that loyalty by laying a trap for Siegfried, knowing he will leap to defend them in battle. Of course, Siegfried isn’t faultless; much as Siegfried defeated Brunhild by secretly using the magical cloak, now the others defend Brunhild’s honor by means of an even more convoluted deception. And while it’s true that the crisis was touched off by the queens’ quarreling, it’s Hagen’s choice to capitalize on the situation, ostensibly in Brunhild’s defense, that triggers actual violence. In addition, Gunther shows himself to be incredibly weak-willed and unwilling to oppose Hagen, despite Siegfried’s faithful friendship in the past. There is much more guilt to go around than the poet’s terse summary suggests.

Related Characters: Gunther (speaker), Hagen (speaker), Kriemhild, Siegfried, Brunhild
Page Number: 118
Chapter 15 Quotes

“You and I are of one blood, dear Hagen, and I earnestly commend my beloved spouse to you to guard him.” Then she divulged some matters that had better been left alone. […] “Now I shall reveal this to you in confidence, dearest kinsman, so that you may keep faith with me, and I shall tell you, trusting utterly in you, where my dear husband can be harmed. When the hot blood flowed from the dragon’s wound and the good knight was bathing in it, a broad leaf fell from the linden between his shoulder-blades. It is there that he can be wounded, and this is why I am so anxious.”

“Sew a little mark on his clothing so that I shall know where I must shield him in battle.”

She fancied she was saving the hero, yet this was aimed at his death.

Related Characters: Kriemhild (speaker), Hagen (speaker), Siegfried
Related Symbols: Clothes
Page Number: 121
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 16 Quotes

The very first kill was when he brought down a strong young tusker, after which he soon chanced on an enormous lion. When his hound had roused it he laid a keen arrow to his bow and shot it so that it dropped in its tracks at the third bound. Siegfried’s fellow-huntsmen acclaimed him for this shot. Next, in swift succession, he killed a wisent, an elk, four mighty aurochs, and a fierce and monstrous buck - so well mounted was he that nothing, be it hart or hind,

could evade him. […]

“If it is not asking too much, lord Siegfried,” said his companions of the chase, “do leave some of the game alive for us. You are emptying the hills and woods for us today.” At this the brave knight had to smile.

Related Characters: Siegfried
Page Number: 126
Explanation and Analysis:

The lady Kriemhild’s lord fell among the flowers, where you could see the blood surging from his wound. Then – and he had cause - he rebuked those who had plotted his foul murder. “You vile cowards,” he said as he lay dying. “What good has my service done me now that you have slain me? I was always loyal to you, but now I have paid for it. Alas, you have wronged your kinsmen so that all who are born in days to come will be dishonoured by your deed. You have cooled your anger on me beyond all measure. You will be held in contempt and stand apart from all good warriors.”

Related Characters: Siegfried (speaker), Kriemhild, Gunther, Hagen
Page Number: 131
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 17 Quotes

Now learn of a deed of overweening pride and grisly vengeance. Hagen ordered the corpse of Siegfried of Nibelungland to be carried in secret to Kriemhild’s apartment and set down on the threshold, so that she should find him there before daybreak when she went out to matins, an office she never overslept.

They pealed the bells as usual at the minster, and lovely Kriemhild waked her many maids and asked for a light and her attire. A chamberlain answered - and came upon Siegfried’s body. […] Before she had ascertained that it was her husband she was already thinking of Hagen’s question how he might shelter Siegfried, and now she rued it with a vengeance! From the moment she

learned of Siegfried’s death she was the sworn enemy of her own happiness.

Related Characters: Kriemhild, Siegfried, Hagen
Related Symbols: Dawn
Page Number: 133
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 39 Quotes

“You have repaid me in base coin,” she said, “but Siegfried’s sword I shall have and hold! My fair lover was wearing it when last I saw him, through whom I suffered mortal sorrow at your hands.” She drew it from its sheath -he was powerless to prevent it - and bent her thoughts to robbing him of life. She raised it in both hands - and struck off his head! King Etzel saw this, and great was the grief it gave him.

Related Characters: Kriemhild (speaker), Siegfried, Hagen , Etzel
Page Number: 290
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Nibelungenlied LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Nibelungenlied PDF

Siegfried Character Timeline in The Nibelungenlied

The timeline below shows where the character Siegfried appears in The Nibelungenlied. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
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Further down the Rhine, in the Netherlands city of Xanten, lives a prince named Siegfried, the son of Siegmund and Sieglind. His youth is filled with marvelous deeds, and women... (full context)
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...jousting tournament) and a feast, the festival includes the bestowal of lands and castles on Siegfried’s companions and the giving of rich gifts to all present—indeed, “it rained horses and clothes... (full context)
Chapter 3
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One day, Siegfried hears about Kriemhild’s rare beauty and spirited disposition. (Her reputation has spread beyond Burgundy, though... (full context)
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Siegmund finally agrees to help his son in this endeavor, but warns Siegfried to be wary of Gunther’s many proud vassals, especially Hagen. Siegfried isn’t troubled; whatever he... (full context)
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After a week’s travel, the company arrives in Worms. As squires greet them, Siegfried asks that their horses be kept ready, since it’s his intention to ride away quickly,... (full context)
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Though Hagen has never seen him before, he guesses that the unfamiliar knight is Siegfried, slayer of the Nibelungs. He proceeds to tell Gunther and his men a notable episode... (full context)
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Hagen further relates that Siegfried once slew a dragon and bathed in its blood, which caused his skin to become... (full context)
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Gunther and his warriors welcome Siegfried and ask him what business brings him to Burgundy. Siegfried explains that he has heard... (full context)
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Gunther and his men are angry, but Siegfried persists in his demands. Each country should stake its patrimony against that of the other,... (full context)
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At this point, the Burgundian kings formally welcome Siegfried, promising him that they will share everything in common with him, as long as he... (full context)
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Whenever the knights pass their time in courtly pursuits, they are always glad to include Siegfried, “for he aspired to a noble love.” Meanwhile, Siegfried quietly treasures Kriemhild in his heart,... (full context)
Chapter 4
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...to negotiate with them. Gunther summons his men to court for advice. Hagen suggests asking Siegfried for help. Gunther continues to brood over the matter, and when Siegfried asks what troubles... (full context)
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Gunther tells Siegfried about the threatened invasion. Siegfried urges Gunther to allow him to win honor on Gunther’s... (full context)
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When the envoys return to Denmark, Liudegast is alarmed to hear the report of mighty Siegfried’s support of Burgundy. He and Liudeger accordingly muster more than 40,000 men for the invasion.... (full context)
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After the Burgundians pillage the Saxon countryside, Siegfried rides out by himself to observe the enemy position. He encounters King Liudegast doing the... (full context)
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...gaping wound, and blood was seen flowing over saddles—so boldly did those knights woo honor.” Siegfried and Liudeger are soon locked in combat, but when Liudeger learns Siegfried’s identity, he immediately... (full context)
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...into her chamber to report on the battle. She doesn’t want anyone to suspect that Siegfried is “the darling of her heart.” The page tells her that no warrior’s achievements compare... (full context)
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...weeks after the battle so that the wounded will be able to celebrate, too. When Siegfried asks to return to the Netherlands, Gunther begs him to stay, and Siegfried agrees, in... (full context)
Chapter 5
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...noble guests begin to arrive in Burgundy for the great festivity. Meanwhile, Gunther has observed Siegfried’s love for his sister, Kriemhild. Ortwin suggests that Kriemhild should be allowed to appear before... (full context)
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Kriemhild emerges “like the dawn from the dark clouds,” and Siegfried is freed from the distress of his yearning to see her. He is nevertheless sad,... (full context)
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Gernot then encourages Gunther to present Siegfried to Kriemhild. “With this,” he counsels, “we shall attach this splendid warrior to ourselves.” When... (full context)
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Siegfried accompanies Kriemhild to and from church. Kriemhild thanks him for his service in battle, and... (full context)
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Siegfried, too, makes preparations to leave, but Giselher urges him to stay. Siegfried agrees. As a... (full context)
Chapter 6
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Siegfried, seemingly familiar with Brunhild’s intimidating ways, advises against Gunther’s plan, but Hagen suggests that Gunther... (full context)
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Siegfried plans to bring the magic cloak he won from Alberich, since it gives him the... (full context)
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...food and the best Rhenish wine, are taken aboard. Finally, the four men embark, with Siegfried as captain, since the route to Iceland is familiar to him. (full context)
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...12 days of sailing, they arrive at Brunhild’s fortress of Isenstein in Iceland. Before disembarking, Siegfried cautions the men that they should stick to a common story if Gunther’s quest is... (full context)
Chapter 7
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...above, Gunther sees Brunhild for the first time and deems her beautiful. After they disembark, Siegfried helps Gunther onto his horse within sight of the ladies. Brunhild’s vassals attend to the... (full context)
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Siegfried introduces Gunther to Brunhild, taking care to present Gunther as his lord and himself as... (full context)
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While the rest are preparing for the games, Siegfried returns to the ship and slips into his invisibility cloak. Back at the athletic ring,... (full context)
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In his magic cloak, Siegfried sneaks to Gunther’s side and instructs him not to worry: “Now, you go through the... (full context)
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...her vassals to pay homage to Gunther. Brunhild grants Gunther authority to rule over Iceland. Siegfried returns his magic cloak to the ship and returns to the palace, pretending he doesn’t... (full context)
Chapter 8
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Siegfried sneaks away to Nibelungenland. Upon arriving at a castle, he subdues a burly watchman and... (full context)
Chapter 9
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After more than a week of sailing, Gunther dispatches Siegfried to the Rhine to give Kriemhild and the rest of the Burgundian court news of... (full context)
Chapter 10
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Queen Uote and Kriemhild are escorted to the shores of the Rhine by Siegfried to greet Gunther and Brunhild. Kriemhild welcomes Brunhild with courtesy and affection. Then the ladies... (full context)
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During the subsequent feast, Siegfried reminds Gunther of his oath, that he should have Kriemhild as his wife in exchange... (full context)
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When Brunhild sees Kriemhild seated at Siegfried’s side, she begins to weep. When Gunther asks her what is the matter, she replies,... (full context)
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...that she won’t share Gunther’s bed unless he tells her now. Gunther promises her that Siegfried’s lands are quite as good as his own and that he’s a mighty king; he’s... (full context)
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Gunther and Brunhild soon retire from the festivities, followed by Siegfried and Kriemhild. The latter enjoy a tender and contented night together. Gunther’s night is much... (full context)
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During the subsequent festivities, Siegfried notices that Gunther is in low spirits, and he asks him how his night went.... (full context)
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That night, Siegfried affectionately lies in bed with Kriemhild—and abruptly disappears. He has put on the magical cloak... (full context)
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Siegfried and Brunhild are locked in fierce struggle for a while, and, although Brunhild inflicts “agony”... (full context)
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The festivity lasts for two more weeks. During this time, both Gunther and Siegfried liberally squander robes, gold, horses, and silver on all in attendance. (full context)
Chapter 11
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After the guests depart, Siegfried tells his wife and his men that he, too, wants to return home. Kriemhild, however,... (full context)
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Gernot grants Siegfried a thousand knights for his household. Kriemhild wants to take Hagen and Ortwin as her... (full context)
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...maidens and 500 vassals. Messengers are sent to inform Siegmund and Sieglind that their son, Siegfried, is on the way with his new bride. The happy parents prepare a high seat... (full context)
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Siegfried lives in magnificence and dispenses justice for ten years, at which time Kriemhild gives birth... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Over the past ten years, Brunhild has been disquieted by Kriemhild’s marriage to Siegfried, and she wonders why they hold themselves aloof and offer Burgundy so little service, if... (full context)
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Messengers are sent on the three-week journey to the Netherlands to invite Siegfried and Kriemhild to a festivity that will be held before midsummer. Though the messengers are... (full context)
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The messengers return to Burgundy and share the news that Siegfried and Kriemhild will attend the festivity. They also show off the munificent gifts they received,... (full context)
Chapter 13
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Siegfried, Kriemhild, and Siegmund set out for the festival expecting great joy, though, the poet notes,... (full context)
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...with their ladies and warriors, ride out with great magnificence the next day. Gunther welcomes Siegfried and Siegmund joyfully. The two queens also greet one another courteously. (full context)
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...“[darts] a glance” at Kriemhild “now and again.” A lavish feast is set up, and Siegfried is seated with 1,200 knights. Brunhild thinks that no liegeman could be mightier. The poet... (full context)
Chapter 14
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...the two queens sit watching the warriors at their sports, Kriemhild remarks that her husband, Siegfried, is of such merit that he could rule over all the kingdoms of the region.... (full context)
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Kriemhild persists in saying that splendid Siegfried is fully Gunther’s equal. Brunhild replies that, when the knights came to Iceland, she heard... (full context)
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...“[W]hy should I renounce my claim to so many knights who owe us service through Siegfried?” At this, Kriemhild loses her temper and tells Brunhild that Siegfried in fact ranks above... (full context)
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Both ladies are very angry. Kriemhild declares that, since Brunhild thinks Siegfried to be her liegeman, the King’s vassals must witness whether Kriemhild dares enter the church... (full context)
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...is calling a paramour. Kriemhild claims that it wasn’t Gunther who took Brunhild’s maidenhead, but Siegfried. If Siegfried was indeed Brunhild’s vassal, Kriemhild jeers, then why did she let him make... (full context)
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...and dim from it.” During the church service, Brunhild broods on Kriemhild’s accusation. If indeed Siegfried has boasted of having slept with her, she decides, it will cost him his life. (full context)
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...displaying the gold ring on her finger, which, she claims, was brought to her by Siegfried after he first slept with Brunhild. She also wears a silk, jewel-encrusted belt which Brunhild... (full context)
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...has tried to rob her of her honor. She formally accuses Kriemhild of saying that Siegfried made her his concubine. Gunther is cautious and noncommittal in his response. He summons Siegfried. (full context)
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Gunther tells Siegfried of Kriemhild’s accusation. Siegfried denies it, and Gunther lets him offer an oath in the... (full context)
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...her what is the matter. As soon as he hears the story, he vows that Siegfried must pay. Ortwin, Gernot, and Hagen begin plotting Siegfried’s death. When Giselher comes upon this... (full context)
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Gunther also argues in favor of Siegfried’s loyalty. But the rest of the knights, “though he had done them no wrong,” declare... (full context)
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...watch the sports, many of the vassals continue to nurse resentment. Gunther reminds them of Siegfried’s commitment to the honor of Burgundy, and anyway, Siegfried is so strong and brave that... (full context)
Chapter 15
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When Siegfried hears of the “war,” he immediately offers to ride against the invaders as he has... (full context)
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Hagen asks Kriemhild what he can do to help protect Siegfried from harm in battle. Kriemhild commends Siegfried to Hagen’s protection, revealing that, when Siegfried bathed... (full context)
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The next morning, Siegfried rides out happily with his men for battle. Once Hagen observes the mark sewn on... (full context)
Chapter 16
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Before the men leave for the hunt, Siegfried finds Kriemhild distraught. Last night, she dreamed that two boars chased Siegfried over the heath,... (full context)
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The hunting party rides deep into the forest and sets up camp. Siegfried heads into the woods, guided by a huntsman and hound, and kills many beasts, including... (full context)
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...the wine. Hagen explains that the butlers were misdirected to a different hunting ground. Thirsty, Siegfried soon goes in search of a brook for a drink of water. At this point,... (full context)
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Siegfried, it turns out, “paid for his good manners.” As he bends to drink, Hagen hurls... (full context)
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As he dies, Siegfried rebukes his betrayers: “What good has my service done me now that you have slain... (full context)
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...now be virtually unopposed, he says, and he is glad they’ve put an end to Siegfried’s supremacy. With his last words, Siegfried asks Gunther to stand by Kriemhild loyally. Then he... (full context)
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When they see that Siegfried is dead, the men place his body on a shield and discuss how to conceal... (full context)
Chapter 17
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The warriors wait for nightfall before crossing over the Rhine with Siegfried’s body. Then, Hagen commits a deed of “overweening pride and grisly vengeance.” He orders that... (full context)
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...service. Her chamberlain discovers the bloody corpse on the threshold but doesn’t realize it is Siegfried. He warns Kriemhild to stay where she is. Suspecting the truth, Kriemhild bursts into lament,... (full context)
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...that the dead man might be a stranger, Kriemhild replies, in anguish, that it is Siegfried. She adds, “It is Brunhild who urged it, Hagen did the deed!” When she sees... (full context)
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...that some begin running toward the wailing women even before getting dressed. He soon cradles Siegfried’s body, and the combined mourning of women and vassals causes the city to echo with... (full context)
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The next morning, Siegfried’s body is carried to the cathedral. There Kriemhild meets Gunther and Hagen. Gunther expresses his... (full context)
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After mass, many people bring monetary offerings for Siegfried’s soul. So much is brought that a hundred masses are sung in a day. The... (full context)
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...they accompany the body to the grave, Kriemhild is repeatedly overcome with emotion. She begs Siegfried’s men to break open his sarcophagus so that she can gaze on him a final... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...him, as she seems to be an unwelcome guest in Worms. He reminds her that Siegfried’s crown and realm will be hers. However, her kinsmen, especially Giselher, beg her to remain,... (full context)
Chapter 19
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...next to the church, and she lives there joylessly, going only to services and to Siegfried’s grave. Her keen grief for her husband displays her great virtue. (full context)
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...men, travel to Nibelungenland to fetch it from Alberich the dwarf, who grumbles that if Siegfried hadn’t stolen the invisibility cloak, then none of this would have happened. It takes four... (full context)
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...malice toward Hagen. Her sorrow increases all the more, and she spends 13 years after Siegfried’s death lamenting. (full context)
Chapter 20
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...all night, wishing she had access to the kinds of riches she had enjoyed when Siegfried was alive, yet fearing the disgrace of being married to a heathen. (full context)
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Considering her newfound allies, Kriemhild thinks that perhaps Siegfried may yet be avenged. She will have command of many warriors, after all, and the... (full context)
Chapter 22
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The festivities go on for 17 days. As rich as Siegfried was, Etzel is richer—no man has ever been surrounded by so many noble heroes or... (full context)
Chapter 25
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...depart cheerfully, though they leave many at home whom they will never see again, “for Siegfried’s wounds were still tormenting Kriemhild.” (full context)
Chapter 26
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...sword. Eckewart thanks him, but warns him that people in Hungary hate him for killing Siegfried. Hagen dismisses this and sends Eckewart as messenger to Rüdiger. Rüdiger is glad to learn... (full context)
Chapter 28
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...to give them a warm welcome. He immediately tells them that Kriemhild still weeps for Siegfried. Hagen is dismissive, but Dietrich warns the men to be on their guard. (full context)
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...state of mind in private. Dietrich reveals that he hears Kriemhild weeping and grieving for Siegfried every morning. Volker points out that there’s no stopping whatever will befall them in Etzel’s... (full context)
Chapter 29
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...his aid. Hagen then insists that the two remain seated when Kriemhild passes, even laying Siegfried’s sword provocatively across his lap. Volker does the same with his sword-like fiddle-bow. When the... (full context)
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Kriemhild demands to know why Hagen slew Siegfried. Hagen admits his responsibility for the deed, and says that Siegfried had to pay for... (full context)
Chapter 32
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...vassal and Hagen’s brother, Dancwart. Dancwart welcomes him warmly, but Bloedelin replies that Hagen slew Siegfried and that he and many others must pay for this. He calls on the “wretched... (full context)
Chapter 34
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...them down the stairs. Outside the palace, Hagen taunts Etzel to join in battle—he and Siegfried have a very distant relationship, he jeers, since Siegfried had his pleasure with Kriemhild long... (full context)
Chapter 39
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“You have repaid me in base coin,” says Kriemhild, “but Siegfried’s sword I shall have!” She takes the sword Balmung in her hands and slashes off... (full context)