The Omnivore’s Dilemma

by

Michael Pollan

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Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Bloomsbury edition of The Omnivore’s Dilemma published in 2006.
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Introduction Quotes

So violent a change in a culture’s eating habits is surely the sign of a national eating disorder. Certainly it would never have happened in a culture in possession of deeply rooted traditions surrounding food and eating.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 2
Explanation and Analysis:

We show our surprise at this by speaking of something called the “French paradox,” for how could a people who eat such demonstrably toxic substances as foie gras and triple crème cheese actually be slimmer and healthier than we are? Yet I wonder if it doesn’t make more sense to speak in terms of an American Paradox—that is, a notably unhealthy people obsessed by the idea of eating healthily.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 3
Explanation and Analysis:

What is perhaps most troubling, and sad, about industrial eating is how thoroughly it obscures all these relationships and connections. To go from the chicken (Gallus gallus) to the Chicken McNugget is to leave this world in a journey of forgetting that could hardly be more costly…if we could see what lies on the far side of the increasingly high walls of our industrial agriculture, we would surely change the way we eat.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 10-11
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

The 129 people who depend on George Naylor for their sustenance are all strangers, living at the far end of a food chain so long, intricate, and obscure that neither producer nor consumer has any reason to know the first thing about the other. Ask one of those eaters where their steak or soda comes from and she’ll tell you “the supermarket.”

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker), George Naylor
Page Number: 34-35
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

Through natural selection animals have developed a set of hygiene rules, functioning much like taboos. One of the most troubling things about factory farms is how cavalierly they flout these evolutionary rules, forcing animals to overcome deeply ingrained aversions. We make them trade their instincts for antibiotics.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker), Steer number 534
Page Number: 76
Explanation and Analysis:

For one thing, the health of these animals is inextricably linked to our own by that web of relationships. The unnaturally rich diet of corn that undermines a steer’s health fattens his flesh in a way that undermines the health of the humans who will eat it. The antibiotics these animals consume with their corn at this very moment are selecting…for new strains of resistant bacteria that will someday infect us.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker), Steer number 534
Page Number: 81
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

The question is, Who or what (besides our cars) is going to consume and digest all this freshly manufactured biomass—the sugars and starches, the alcohols and acids, the emulsifiers and stabilizers and viscosity-control agents? This is where we come in. It takes a certain kind of eater—an industrial eater—to consume these fractions of corn, and we are, or have evolved into, that supremely adapted creature: the eater of processed food.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 90
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

The power of food science lies in its ability to break foods down into their nutrient parts and then reassemble them in specific ways that, in effect, push our evolutionary buttons, fooling the omnivore’s inherited food selection system. Add fat or sugar to anything and it’s going to taste better on the tongue of an animal that natural selection has wired to seek out energy-dense foods.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 107
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

It looked and smelled pretty good, with a nice crust and bright white interior reminiscent of chicken breast meat. In appearance and texture a nugget certainly alludes to fried chicken, yet all I could really taste was salt, that all-purpose fast-food flavor, and okay, maybe a note of chicken bouillon informing the salt. Overall the nugget seemed more like an abstraction than a full-fledged food, an idea of chicken waiting to be fleshed out.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 112
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

This is an astounding cornucopia of food to draw from a hundred acres of pasture, yet what is perhaps still more astonishing is the fact that this pasture will be in no way diminished by the process…Salatin’s audacious bet is that feeding ourselves from nature need not be a zero-sum proposition, one in which if there is more for us at the end of the season then there must be less for nature—less topsoil, less fertility, less life.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker), Joel Salatin
Related Symbols: Grass
Page Number: 126-127
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

You have a choice of getting sad about all that or moving on. We tried hard to build a cooperative community and a local food system, but at the end of the day it wasn’t successful. This is just lunch for most people. Just lunch. We can call it sacred, we can talk about communion, but it’s just lunch.

Related Characters: Gene Kahn (speaker)
Page Number: 153
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

Our civilization and, increasingly, our food system are strictly organized on industrial lines. They prize consistency, mechanization, predictability, interchangeability, and economies of scale. Everything about corn meshes smoothly with the gears of this great machine; grass doesn’t.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Related Symbols: Corn, Grass
Page Number: 201
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

“Efficiency” is the term usually invoked to defend large-scale industrial farms, and it usually refers to the economies of scale that can be achieved by the application of technology and standardization. Yet Joel Salatin’s farm makes the case for a very different sort of efficiency—the one found in natural systems, with their coevolutionary relationships and reciprocal loops. For example, in nature there is no such thing as a waste problem, since one creature’s waste becomes another creature’s lunch.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker), Joel Salatin
Page Number: 214
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 12 Quotes

Polyface’s customers know to come after noon on a chicken day, but there’s nothing to prevent them from showing up earlier and watching their dinner being killed—indeed, customers are welcome to watch, and occasionally one does. More than any USDA rule or regulation, this transparency is their best assurance that the meat they’re buying has been humanely and cleanly processed.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker), Joel Salatin
Page Number: 235
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

[I]f the bar code on the typical package of pork chops summoned images of the CAFO it came from, and information on the pig’s diet and drug regimen, who could bring themselves to buy it? Our food system depends on consumers’ not knowing much about it beyond the price disclosed by the checkout scanner. Cheapness and ignorance are mutually reinforcing.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 244-245
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 14 Quotes

Every meal at a table recapitulates this evolution from nature to culture, as we pass from satisfying our animal appetites in semisilence to the lofting of conversational balloons. The pleasures of the table begin with eating…but they can end up anywhere human talk cares to go. In the same way that the raw becomes cooked, eating becomes dining.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 272
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 15 Quotes

For one of the things I was hoping to accomplish by rejoining, however briefly, this shortest and oldest of food chains was to take some more direct, conscious responsibility for the killing of the animals I eat.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 281
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 16 Quotes

And while our senses can help us draw the first rough distinctions between good and bad foods, we humans have to rely on culture to remember and keep it all straight. So we codify the rules of wise eating in an elaborate structure of taboos, rituals, manners, and culinary traditions, covering everything from the proper size of portions to the order in which foods should be consumed to the kinds of animals it is and is not okay to eat.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker), Paul Rozin (speaker)
Page Number: 295-296
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 17 Quotes

This isn’t to say that we can’t or shouldn’t transcend our inheritance, only that it is our inheritance; whatever else might be gained by giving up meat, this much at least is lost. The notion of granting rights to animals may lift us up from the brutal, amoral world of eater and eaten—of predation—but along the way it will entail the sacrifice, our sublimation, of part of our identity—of our own animality.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 314-315
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 18 Quotes

This for many people is what is most offensive about hunting—to some, disgusting: that it encourages, or allows, us not only to kill but to take a certain pleasure in killing. It’s not as though the rest of us don’t countenance the killing of tens of millions of animals every year. Yet for some reason we feel more comfortable with the mechanical killing practiced, out of view and without emotion, by industrial agriculture.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 360-361
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 20 Quotes

I prized, too, the almost perfect transparency of this meal, the brevity and simplicity of the food chain that linked it to the wider world…I knew the true cost of this food, the precise sacrifice of time and energy and life it had entailed.

Related Characters: Michael Pollan (speaker)
Page Number: 409
Explanation and Analysis:
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