The Portrait of a Lady

by

Henry James

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Portrait of a Lady can help.
An American expatriate and art collector who lives in Paris. Having known Isabel Archer as a child, they reconnect while Isabel is traveling Europe and remain good friends. Rosier is an unassuming and good-natured individual who falls in love with Pansy Osmond. She returns his feelings and Isabel approves of this love match. However, Pansy’s father Gilbert Osmond does not, judging that Rosier is not wealthy or connected enough to be a favorable suitor for his daughter.

Edward Rosier Quotes in The Portrait of a Lady

The The Portrait of a Lady quotes below are all either spoken by Edward Rosier or refer to Edward Rosier. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford edition of The Portrait of a Lady published in 2009.
Chapter 36 Quotes

The object of Mr. Rosier’s well-regulated affection dwelt in a high house in the very heart of Rome; a dark and massive structure overlooking a sunny piazzetta in the neighbourhood of the Farnese Palace. In a palace, too, little Pansy lived—a palace by Roman measure, but a dungeon to poor Rosier’s apprehensive mind. It seemed to him of evil omen that the young lady he wished to marry, and whose fastidious father he doubted of his ability to conciliate, should be immured in a kind of domestic fortress […] he could see that the proportions of the windows and even the details of the cornice had quite the grand air.

Related Symbols: Architecture
Page Number: 363
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 37 Quotes

He took his course to the adjoining room and met Mrs. Osmond coming out of the deep doorway. She was dressed in black velvet; she looked high and splendid, as he had said, and yet oh so radiantly gentle! […] She had lost something of that quick eagerness to which her husband had privately taken exception—she had more the air of being able to wait. Now, at all events, framed in the gilded doorway, she struck our young man as the picture of a gracious lady.

Related Characters: Isabel Archer, Edward Rosier
Related Symbols: Doorways
Page Number: 366
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 41 Quotes

“If she should marry Lord Warburton I should be very glad,” Isabel went on frankly. “He’s an excellent man. You say, however, that she only to sit perfectly still. Perhaps she won’t sit perfectly still. If she loses Mr. Rosier she may jump up!”

Osmond appeared to give no heed to this; he sat gazing at the fire. “Pansy would like to be a great lady,” he remarked in a moment with a certain tenderness of tone. “She wishes above all to please,” he added.

Related Characters: Isabel Archer (speaker), Gilbert Osmond (speaker), Edward Rosier, Pansy Osmond
Page Number: 417
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 50 Quotes

“One’s daughter should be fresh and fair; she should be innocent and gentle. With the manners of the present time she is liable to become so dusty and crumpled. Pansy’s a little dusty, a little dishevelled; she has knocked about too much. This bustling, pushing rabble that calls itself society—one should take her out of it occasionally. Convents are very quiet, very convenient, very salutary. I like to think of her there, in the old garden, under the arcade, among those tranquil virtuous women. Many of them are gentlewomen born; several of them are noble. She will have her books and her drawing, she will have her piano. I’ve made the most liberal arrangements.”

Page Number: 524
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Portrait of a Lady LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Portrait of a Lady PDF

Edward Rosier Character Timeline in The Portrait of a Lady

The timeline below shows where the character Edward Rosier appears in The Portrait of a Lady. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 20
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The European Old World vs. the American New World Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
...who often hosts gatherings for fellow American expatriates. At one such gathering, Isabel meets Edward Rosier, an art collector whom she knew as a child. Rosier is similarly delighted to see... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The European Old World vs. the American New World Theme Icon
As usual, Henrietta has strong judgments about everything around her. She finds Edward Rosier to be even more Europeanized than the unfortunate Ralph Touchett and lectures Rosier “on the... (full context)
Chapter 36
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Skipping forward some time, it is now the autumn of 1876. Edward Rosier, the art collector who is also Isabel’s childhood friend, arrives to visit Madame Merle in... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Madame Merle questions Rosier about his financial means and prospects. At times she ridicules his naïve grasp on financial... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Next, Rosier goes to visit the Osmonds at their house in Rome. Mrs. Osmond (Isabel) regularly hosts... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Rosier describes the Osmonds’ house in Rome. It is “a dark and massive structure” whose architecture... (full context)
Chapter 37
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Rosier bumps into Osmond before he finds Pansy. Showing a lack of social wiles, Rosier asks... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Rosier takes his leave of Osmond, coming across Isabel in the adjoining room. She is dressed... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Isabel helps Rosier to unobtrusively meet with Pansy at the party. Pansy has developed into a pretty nineteen-year-old... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
...arrives to the party and speaks with Osmond. He reveals he was intentionally rude to Rosier, because the young art collector is not the right match for Pansy. Merle suggests that... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The European Old World vs. the American New World Theme Icon
Pansy enters the room, trailed by Rosier. Madame Merle is immediately proved wrong—it is clear that Rosier has announced his feelings to... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
Madame Merle approaches Rosier to communicate her disappointment that he has broken her promise. Rosier then speaks to Isabel,... (full context)
Chapter 38
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Edward Rosier visits Madame Merle the next day and is surprised that she forgives him so easily... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Rosier seeks out Isabel once more to discuss his predicament. She secretively assures him that Pansy... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Edward Rosier asks Pansy if her feelings toward him have changed. She answers truthfully that they have... (full context)
Chapter 40
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Madame Merle explains that she is visiting for the sole purpose of discussing Edward Rosier’s pursuit of Pansy’s hand in marriage. She reveals that Rosier often visits her to request... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Madame Merle also states that Rosier is concerned at Lord Warburton’s interest in Pansy. Merle favors the potential marriage for Pansy... (full context)
Chapter 41
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
...seems to experience a change in heart regarding the love match between Pansy and Edward Rosier, instead preferring Pansy to marry Lord Warburton as Madame Merle has suggested. (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
...different character from his previous love, Isabel herself. Isabel also hopes that Pansy’s feelings for Rosier lack depth and that she can be persuaded to move on easily enough, although she... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
...great lady. He ignores Isabel’s warning that Pansy had a great depth of feeling for Rosier. (full context)
Chapter 43
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
...She has been holding Pansy’s flowers for some time while her stepdaughter dances, when Edward Rosier approaches her. Pansy has denied him a dance, and, realizing that Isabel is holding Pansy’... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The European Old World vs. the American New World Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
...Isabel and Lord Warburton walk together at the party, they pass a wholly dejected Edward Rosier who is watching Pansy from a doorway. Warburton comments on the other man’s miserable demeanor,... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
...her leave from Lord Warburton after their strange moment of studying one another. She finds Rosier still staged miserably in the doorway. She gives him hope for a union with Pansy. (full context)
Chapter 45
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
...though, Isabel retracts her emotion and claims that Lord Warburton should let Pansy and Edward Rosier pursue their love match. Ralph defends Warburton’s good character, admitting that he would treat Pansy... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Pansy then reveals to Isabel that her greatest desire in life is to marry Edward Rosier, for she loves him. Osmond’s disapproval is the only things that stops her. Isabel tries... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Pansy seeks Isabel’s advice on what to do if a man different to Rosier proposed to her. The young woman is crushed when Isabel hears herself advise the girl... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
...quite relieved after her talk with Pansy that clarifies the situation with Lord Warburton and Rosier. Isabel’s final piece of advice for her stepdaughter is that Osmond expects her to marry... (full context)
Chapter 50
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Isabel visits the Coliseum with Pansy and the Countess Gemini. Isabel sees Edward Rosier watching them from afar, and when she finds herself alone, Rosier approaches her. He has... (full context)
The Dangers of Wealth Theme Icon
Pansy and the Countess Gemini rejoin Isabel. Rosier wants to talk to the Countess, so Isabel and Pansy return to their carriage. The... (full context)
Female Independence vs. Marriage Theme Icon
Art and Morality Theme Icon
...admit to the obvious truth, accusing her brother of sending Pansy away because of Edward Rosier’s desire to marry her. She believes that Osmond knows that she approves of Rosier and... (full context)