The Rover

Masks Symbol Icon
Hellena, Florinda, and the cavaliers all use masks and disguises in order to plan and carry out their various liaisons. On a deeper level, however, masks represent the confusion of identity that takes place within this play. Willmore and Hellena fall in love without even knowing each other’s names. Belvile, meanwhile, repeatedly does not recognize Florinda even when she is right in front of him. Masks, therefore, are emblems of confusion and deception, and proof that identity is not as stable or singular as it seems.

Masks Quotes in The Rover

The The Rover quotes below all refer to the symbol of Masks. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Gender Roles Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of The Rover published in 1993.
Act 2, Scene 1 Quotes

Willmore: But why thus disguis’d and muzzl’d?
Belvile: Because whatever Extravagances we commit in these Faces, our own may not be oblig’d to answer ‘em.
Willmore: I should have changed my Eternal Buff too: but no matter, my little Gypsy wou’d not have found me out then: for if she should change hers, it is impossible I should know her, unless I should hear her prattle—A Pox on’t, I cannot get her out of my Head: Pray Heaven, if ever I do see her again, she prove damnably ugly, that I may fortify my self against her Tongue.

Related Characters: Willmore (speaker), Belvile (speaker), Hellena
Related Symbols: Carnival, Masks
Page Number: 174
Explanation and Analysis:

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Act 3, Scene 1 Quotes

Ah Rogue! Such black Eyes, such a Face, such a Mouth, such Teeth—and so much Wit!

Related Characters: Willmore (speaker), Hellena
Related Symbols: Masks
Page Number: 196
Explanation and Analysis:

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Act 4, Scene 2 Quotes

Angelica: Thou, false as Hell, what canst thou say to this?
Willmore: By Heaven—
Angelica: Hold, do not damn thy self—
Hellena: Nor hope to be believ’d.
Angelica: Oh perjur’d Man!
Is’t thus you pay my generous Passion back?
Hellena: Why wou’d you, Sir, abuse my Lady’s Faith?
Angelica: And use me so inhumanly?
Hellena: A Maid so young, so innocent—
Willmore: Ah, young Devil!
Angelica: Dost thou not know thy Life is in my power?
Hellena: Or think my Lady cannot be reveng’d?
Willmore: So, so, the Storm comes finely on.
Angelica: Now thou art silent, Guilt has struck thee dumb.
Oh hadst thou still been so, I’d liv’d in safety.

Related Characters: Willmore (speaker), Hellena (speaker), Angelica (speaker)
Related Symbols: Masks
Page Number: 217
Explanation and Analysis:

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Masks Symbol Timeline in The Rover

The timeline below shows where the symbol Masks appears in The Rover. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 1
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Class and Money Theme Icon
Don Pedro enters holding a mask for Carnival, along with his servant Stephano. He brings along with him Callis, the sisters’... (full context)
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
...cousin Valeria; they persuade Callis to go with them. Stephano enters, telling them that their masks are ready. Florinda decides to write a note that she can give to Belvile if... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 2
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
...the time being is “Love and Mirth.” As the men look on, a group of masked, reveling men enters the street, along with a group of women dressed as courtesans, though... (full context)
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Two men enter in masks, covered in horns. They too wear signs on their backs, and the Englishmen engage in... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 1
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
...Frederick, and Wilmore enter the same street, intending to seek out Angelica—the first two are masked, while Willmore is not. When Willmore asks why they where masks, Belvile replies that they... (full context)
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Wit and Language Theme Icon
Willmore says that he should have worn a mask as well, but then reflects that if he had, he would not have met his... (full context)
Class and Money Theme Icon
Seeing Don Pedro enter in his mask (along with Stephano), the Englishmen exit to watch the proceedings. Pedro, meanwhile, resolves to go... (full context)
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Class and Money Theme Icon
...she means to seduce both him and Don Antonio. As if on cue, Antonio (also masked) attended by his page Diego and a group of musicians, enters. Antonio and Pedro both... (full context)
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Pedro now realizes that his masked rival is Antonio; he is appalled both because his friend has scorned Florinda, and because... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 1
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
...is located later in the afternoon so that Hellena can meet Willmore. They are still masked. Having recently found Don Pedro in an ill humor, Florinda wonders whether he has discovered... (full context)
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Wit and Language Theme Icon
...are alike, destined to fool men and women into loving them. She takes off her mask, supposedly showing him how deceptive her face is before asking him whether he likes it.... (full context)
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Wit and Language Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Hellena tells Willmore that she will unmask again only if he reveals what he was doing in Angelica’s house. Willmore responds lamely,... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 3
Gender Roles Theme Icon
...that Belvile is late. While she goes to hide the jewels, a drunk, belligerent, and masked Willmore enters, annoyed that he has been unable to find Belvile or Frederick. He decides... (full context)
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Belvile and Frederick enter (they are masked), looking for Willmore. Hearing Florinda’s cries for help, they rush to her aid, pulling Willmore... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 4
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Three masked revelers enter, and cry out that a man has been killed (Willmore has injured Antonio).... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 2
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Don Pedro enters, masked, and remarks that Antonio is late. Florinda is surprised to hear Antonio’s name, as Pedro... (full context)
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
...to stop. Pedro refuses, and the two fight, until Belvile disarms Pedro. At this, a masked Florinda intercedes once again, attempting to save her brother. Belvile refuses, yet again not recognizing... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 1
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Angelica enters, veiled and masked. Willmore runs to her, believing it to be his gypsy girl and demanding that she... (full context)
Love vs. Lust Theme Icon
Deceit and Disguise Theme Icon
Wit and Language Theme Icon
...and tells them that revelers have come into the house to dance with them. The masqueraders enter, and Blunt wishes he could remove their masks to see if Lucetta is among... (full context)