The Scarlet Pimpernel

by

Baroness Orczy

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Armand St. Just Character Analysis

Marguerite’s brother and a citizen of the French Republic. Armand and Marguerite are exceedingly close. Their parents died when the siblings were just children, and they were left to raise each other. Armand lives in France but has recently spent time in England with his sister, and she is reluctant to let him go. He is an “ardent republican” and “enthusiastic” supporter of the French Revolution, which stems in part from the beating he endured at the hands of the Marquis de St. Cyr for “daring to love” the aristocrat’s daughter. Despite his support of the French Republic, however, Armand’s political views are “moderate and conciliatory,” and he grows disillusioned with the violence of the Reign of Terror. Armand secretly betrays France and joins the League of the Scarlet Pimpernel, a fact that is revealed through a letter written by Armand to Sir Andrew Ffoulkes. Chauvelin learns of this betrayal after he finds Armand’s letter to Sir Andrew, and he uses the information to blackmail Marguerite. Chauvelin promises to secure Armand a pardon for his treason if Marguerite helps Chauvelin identify the Scarlet Pimpernel, which she begrudgingly agrees to do. Armand ultimately escapes Chauvelin and France and helps to rescue the Comte de Tournay in the process. While it nearly cost him his life, Armand is true to his moral compass, a virtue that Orczy implies is more admirable than remaining blindly loyal to one’s country.

Armand St. Just Quotes in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The The Scarlet Pimpernel quotes below are all either spoken by Armand St. Just or refer to Armand St. Just. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Signet edition of The Scarlet Pimpernel published in 1974.
Chapter 5 Quotes

She went up effusively to them both, with not a single touch of embarrassment in her manner or in her smile. Lord Tony and Sir Andrew watched the little scene with eager apprehension. English though they were, they had often been in France, and had mixed sufficiently with the French to realise the unbending hauteur, the bitter hatred with which the old noblesse of France viewed all those who had helped to contribute to their downfall. Armand St. Just, the brother of beautiful Lady Blakeney—though known to hold moderate and conciliatory views—was an ardent republican; his feud with the ancient family of St. Cyr—the rights and wrongs of which no outsider ever knew—had culminated in the downfall, the almost total extinction, of the latter.

Page Number: 38-9
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

She hated the Marquis. Years ago, Armand, her dear brother, had loved Angele de St. Cyr, but St. Just was a plebeian, and the Marquis full of the pride and arrogant prejudices of his caste. One day Armand, the respectful, timid lover, ventured on sending a small poem—enthusiastic, ardent, passionate —to the idol of his dreams. The next night he was waylaid just outside Paris by the valets of the Marquis de St. Cyr, and ignominiously thrashed—thrashed like a dog within an inch of his life—because he had dared to raise his eyes to the daughter of the aristocrat. The incident was one which, in those days, some two years before the great Revolution, was of almost daily occurrence in France; incidents of that type, in fact, led to the bloody reprisals, which a few years later sent most of those haughty heads to the guillotine.

Related Symbols: The Guillotine
Page Number: 60
Explanation and Analysis:

She had but little real sympathy with those haughty French aristocrats, insolent in their pride of caste, of whom the Comtesse de Tournay de Basserive was so typical an example; but, republican and liberal-minded though she was from principle, she hated and loathed the methods which the young Republic had chosen for establishing itself. She had not been in Paris for some months; the horrors and bloodshed of the Reign of Terror, culminating in the September massacres, had only come across the Channel to her as a faint echo. Robespierre, Danton, Marat, she had not known in their new guise of bloody justiciaries, merciless wielders of the guillotine. Her very soul recoiled in horror from these excesses, to which she feared her brother Armand—moderate republican as he was—might become one day the holocaust.

Related Symbols: The Guillotine
Page Number: 67-8
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 16 Quotes

"Listen to the tale, Sir Percy,” she said, and her voice now was low, sweet, infinitely tender. "Armand was all in all to me! We had no parents, and brought one another up. He was my little father, and I, his tiny mother; we loved one another so. Then one day—do you mind me, Sir Percy? The Marquis de St. Cyr had my brother Armand thrashed— thrashed by his lacqueys—that brother whom I loved better than all the world! And his offence? That he, a plebeian, had dared to love the daughter of the aristocrat; for that he was waylaid and thrashed ... thrashed like a dog within an inch of his life! Oh, how I suffered! His humiliation had eaten into my very soul! When the opportunity occurred, and I was able to take my revenge, I took it. But I only thought to bring that proud marquis to trouble and humiliation. He plotted with Austria against his own country. Chance gave me knowledge of this; I spoke of it, but I did not know—how could I guess?—they trapped and duped me. When I realised what I had done, it was too late.”

Page Number: 135
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 17 Quotes

She felt no longer anxious about Armand. The man who had just ridden away, bent on helping her brother, inspired her with complete confidence in his strength and in his power. She marveled at herself for having ever looked upon him as an inane fool; of course, that was a mask worn to hide the bitter wound she had dealt to his faith and to his love. His passion would have overmastered him, and he would not let her see how much he still cared and how deeply he suffered.

Page Number: 147
Explanation and Analysis:
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Armand St. Just Character Timeline in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The timeline below shows where the character Armand St. Just appears in The Scarlet Pimpernel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3: The Refugees
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...Blakeney and his wife, Lady Blakeney, but they won’t be staying long. Lady Blakeney’s brother, Armand St. Just, is sailing to France aboard Lord Percy’s yacht, Day Dream, and will leave... (full context)
Chapter 6: An Exquisite of ‘92
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
...just as the French Revolution began, and since her parents were dead, her young brother, Armand, was her only chaperone. She is “from principle and by conviction a republican,” and “equality... (full context)
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
...Lady Blakeney says there’s no time—the skipper of the Day Dream is coming to take Armand back to France, and she doesn’t want him to miss the tide. “Then Armand can... (full context)
Chapter 7: The Secret Orchard
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
Outside “The Fisherman’s Rest,” Marguerite’s brother, Armand, approaches. Marguerite yells excitedly to him. She is dreading her brother’s return to France, where... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
“Hush!” Armand warns, looking around suspiciously. Marguerite’s fear for her brother’s safety is obvious. “Ah! You see:... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Armand asks Marguerite if Sir Percy knows about “the part [she] played” in the capture of... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Armand is confused by his sister’s heartache. Sir Percy has always loved Marguerite more than she... (full context)
Chapter 8: The Accredited Agent
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
As Armand sails away, Marguerite stands and watches him disappear. Sir Percy leaves her to her thoughts... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
...the Marquis,” but she never intended for them to go to the guillotine. Years ago, Armand had fallen in love with a young St. Cyr girl, but since he was merely... (full context)
Chapter 9: The Outrage
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...a mask, revealing “pale, fox-like eyes.” He grabs Sir Andrew’s pocketbook and reads several letters. “Armand St. Just a traitor after all,” Chauvelin smirks. “Now, fair Marguerite, I think that you... (full context)
Chapter 10: In the Opera Box
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...will be at Lord Grenville’s ball later and will speak with him there. “Your brother, St. Just , is in peril,” Chauvelin says. (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
...Several letters and important papers were found among Sir Andrew’s things, including a letter from Armand St. Just, which proves him “to be not only in sympathy with the enemies of... (full context)
Chapter 13: Either—Or?
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
...at one o’clock precisely.” It is nearly eleven now, which means that both Marguerite and Armand’s “fate will be sealed” in two hours. To Lady Blakeney, “it seems a horrible thing... (full context)
Chapter 14: One O’clock Precisely!
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...Lady Blakeney thinks about her predicament. She will tell Chauvelin what she has discovered, save Armand, and “let that cunning Scarlet Pimpernel extricate himself after that.” Soon, Chauvelin slips quietly into... (full context)
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Chauvelin promises to send Armand’s “imprudent letter” to Lady Blakeney tomorrow by carrier, and heads directly to the dining-room. He... (full context)
Chapter 15: Doubt
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...a corner. “Then we have failed, you and I?” she asks. “Perhaps,” responds Chauvelin. “But Armand?” Lady Blakeney questions. “Ah!” Chauvelin says. “Armand St. Just’s chances hang on a thread…Pray heaven,... (full context)
Chapter 16: Richmond
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
...she tells him all about the Marquis de St. Cyr and his despicable treatment of Armand, a mere “plebian,” for “daring to love” a woman of noble birth. “When the opportunity... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...stressed and exhausted from the events of the night, nearly breaks down and cries. “Percy! —Armand is in deadly danger,” she says and quickly tells him about Armand’s letter to Sir... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
Sir Percy finally agrees to help Armand. “I pledge you my word that he shall be safe,” he says. “Now, have I... (full context)
Chapter 17: Farewell
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
Lady Blakeney retires to her room but does not sleep. Despite her worry for Armand, Lady Blakeney thinks only of Sir Percy, and her “limbs seem to ache with longing... (full context)
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...response. “Nay, there is no mystery,” Sir Percy says. “My business has to do with Armand…there!” he cries and drives away. (full context)
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
As Lady Blakeney watches Sir Percy drive away, she is “no longer anxious about Armand.” She can’t believe she ever thought her husband “an inane fool,” and she is even... (full context)
Chapter 19: The Scarlet Pimpernel
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...Percy’s groom appears and gives Lady Blakeney an envelope. She tears it open and finds Armand’s letter to Sir Andrew. The groom claims that a “runner” has just dropped it off,... (full context)
Chapter 20: The Friend
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...“to delude herself with any vain and futile hopes.” The fact that Chauvelin sent her Armand’s letter means that he too has discovered Sir Percy’s identity as the Scarlet Pimpernel. She... (full context)
Chapter 23: Hope
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...says, there is still the case of the Comte de Tournay to deal with, and Armand. There is no way the Scarlet Pimpernel will leave France without them, he reminds her.... (full context)
Chapter 27: On the Track
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...hut. After listening at the windows, it was discovered that the men, most likely, are Armand St. Just and the Comte de Tournay. Four soldiers have stayed behind and are presently... (full context)
Chapter 28: The Père Blanchard’s Hut
Loyalty Theme Icon
If Armand and the Comte are alone, Chauvelin continues, the men are to warn one another and... (full context)
Chapter 29: Trapped
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...they continue to fine-tune their plans. There are now two additional men—strangers—inside the hut with Armand and the Comte, and a yacht is anchored out at sea. The ship is obviously... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
...you one small word of warning.” He orders her not to speak or scream, or Armand’s safety will be compromised. Chauvelin promises to spare Armand’s life if she follows his simple... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...and Lady Blakeney remains silent. She tries frantically to conceive of a plan to save Armand, Sir Percy, and everyone else, but she comes up empty. It is “impossible that she,... (full context)
Chapter 30: The Schooner
Loyalty Theme Icon
...she hears the “click” of Desgas’s gun. Suddenly, Lady Blakeney runs toward the cliff screaming. “Armand! Armand! For God’s sake fire! Your leader is near! He is coming! He is betrayed!”... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...to a mechanical sound in the distance. “The schooner’s boat!” one of the men shouts. Armand and the three men had snuck down to the water, boarded the dinghy and are... (full context)
Chapter 31: The Escape
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
...episode at the ball.” She is shocked that Percy knows even about the ball. “But Armand…” she remembers. Safely aboard the Day Dream, Percy says, with the Comte de Tournay. (full context)
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
...boat of the Day Dream?” Marguerite asks. Sir Percy laughs. When he slipped instructions for Armand into the hut, Percy gave him a second letter to leave behind for Chauvelin—sending him... (full context)