The Scarlet Pimpernel

by

Baroness Orczy

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The landlord of the “Chat Gris,” an inn in France and official meeting place of the League of the Scarlet Pimpernel. Brogard is a dirty and unpleasant man, and his inn is described as dilapidated and “squalid.” Brogard and his rundown inn serve as a foil to Mr. Jellyband and “The Fisherman’s Rest.” Both Brogard and Jellyband’s inns act as small-scale representations of Orczy’s views on French and English society respectively, and by comparison to Jellyband’s cheery and comfortable inn, Brogard and the “Chat Gris” paint a particularly bad picture of the new French Republic. However, Brogard has a “certain amount of respect” for the Scarlet Pimpernel and goes out of his way to make him comfortable, which reflects Orczy’s own support of the aristocracy. The Scarlet Pimpernel is considered an enemy of France, yet Brogard appears fond of him and even supports his efforts by allowing the inn to be used as a meeting spot.
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Brogard Character Timeline in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The timeline below shows where the character Brogard appears in The Scarlet Pimpernel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 22: Calais
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...assures Lady Blakeney they are in the right place. The man who let them in, Brogard, is the landlord. “Faith! Our host and hostess are not cheerful people,” Sir Andrew says,... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
“Tall Englishman?” Brogard asks. “To-day! —Yes.” Sir Andrew and Lady Blakeney immediately stop eating. Brogard continues. “He went…yes…but... (full context)
Chapter 23: Hope
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...then they can save some valuable time and evade Chauvelin. Sir Andrew agrees and asks Brogard for a room for Lady Blakeney to wait in. “She can wait up there!” he... (full context)
Chapter 24: The Death-Trap
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Lady Blakeney sits quietly for more than fifteen minutes, and then Brogard begins to set the table again. He arranges the table with care, and he “seems... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...she hears another set of footsteps that tells her this new customer is not alone. Brogard goes to the door and opens it, and Lady Blakeney can see two men dressed... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
“A plate of soup and a bottle of wine,” Chauvelin orders Brogard “imperiously,” “then clear out of here—understand? I want to be alone.” Once Chauvelin is sure... (full context)