The Scarlet Pimpernel

by

Baroness Orczy

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The owner of “The Fisherman’s Rest” and Sally’s father. Mr. Jellyband is described as a “worthy” and “honest” host, and his inn is comfortable and inviting. Orczy describes Jellyband as a “typical rural John Bull,” which is a popular image of an Englishman similar to that of Uncle Sam in the United States. According to Jellyband, all of Europe is “a den of immorality,” and the rest of the world “an unexploited land of savages and cannibals.” This obviously bigoted viewpoint reflects popular assumptions of British superiority held by broader society during the days of British imperialism and colonialism, a belief that Orczy herself openly held. Mr. Jellyband supports the monarchy and opposes the revolution in France, which makes his “blood boil.” He refers to the French citizens as “murderin’ devils” and believes that England should interfere on behalf of the aristocrats. Mr. Jellyband is proud of the efforts of the Scarlet Pimpernel and his men to save the condemned aristocrats, and he happily welcomes those who escape across the Channel into England. Mr. Jellyband serves as the personification of the typical middleclass Englishman during the French Revolution—sympathetic to the plight of the aristocracy and completely opposed to the revolution.

Mr. Jellyband Quotes in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The The Scarlet Pimpernel quotes below are all either spoken by Mr. Jellyband or refer to Mr. Jellyband. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Signet edition of The Scarlet Pimpernel published in 1974.
Chapter 2 Quotes

“That’s quite right, Mr. ’Empseed,” retorted Jellyband, "and as I says, what can you ’xpect? There’s all them Frenchy devils over the Channel yonder a murderin’ their king and nobility, and Mr. Pitt and Mr. Fox and Mr. Burke a- fightin’ and a-wranglin’ between them, if we Englishmen should 'low them to go on in their ungodly way. ’Let ’em murder!’ says Mr. Pitt. ‘Stop ’em!’ says Mr. Burke.”

“And let ’em murder, says I, and be demmed to ’em,” said Mr. Hempseed, emphatically, for he had but little liking for his friend Jellyband’s political arguments, wherein he always got out of his depth, and had but little chance for displaying those pearls of wisdom which had earned for him so high a reputation in the neighbourhood and so many free tankards of ale at “The Fisherman’s Rest.”

Related Characters: Mr. Jellyband (speaker), Mr. Hempseed (speaker)
Page Number: 15
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Scarlet Pimpernel PDF

Mr. Jellyband Character Timeline in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The timeline below shows where the character Mr. Jellyband appears in The Scarlet Pimpernel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: Dover: “The Fisherman’s Rest”
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...hear the loud and happy crowd that has assembled in the coffee-room. Sally’s father, Mr. Jellyband, the “worthy host” and landlord of “The Fisherman’s Rest,” sits visiting his patrons. It is... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...his knowledge of Scripture. Mr. Hempseed is a regular at “The Fisherman’s Rest,” and Mr. Jellyband often makes “a special selection of him as a foil for political arguments.” The two... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Mr. Jellyband yells to Sally to get the evening meal ready. “Is you ‘xpecting special guest then... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
At a nearby table, two strangers sit listening to Mr. Jellyband’s “international opinions.” One of the strangers asks Jellyband how the foreigners were able to sway... (full context)
Chapter 3: The Refugees
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...place to do so; “it is for Austria to take the initiative.” Men like Mr. Jellyband, a “royalist and anti-revolutionist,” are angered by Mr. Pitt’s “caution and moderation.” (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...is well known at “The Fisherman’s Rest.” Lord Tony always stays the night at Mr. Jellyband’s inn whenever he crosses the Channel, and he immediately tells his host that a few... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Mr. Jellyband tells Lord Anthony that he is not expecting any other guests, except for Sir Percy... (full context)
Chapter 5: Marguerite
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...she proclaims. A “low and musical voice” can be heard outside the door and Mr. Jellyband quickly opens it. Lady Blakeney enters, complaining about being wet and cold. At twenty-five years... (full context)
Chapter 6: An Exquisite of ‘92
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
...I withdraw myself,” he says. “Aye, do!” Sir Percy says and then yells to Mr. Jellyband for a drink. Lady Blakeney says there’s no time—the skipper of the Day Dream is... (full context)
Chapter 21: Suspense
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
By the time Lady Blakeney reaches “The Fisherman’s Rest” it is past midnight. Mr. Jellyband welcomes her into the coffee-room, and she takes a seat next to the hearth. “I... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...“almost unrecognizable in his lacquey-like garb.” He joins her in the coffee-room with a suspicious Jellyband looking on. “Stay, Lady Blakeney,” Sir Andrew says. “I am sorry to say we cannot... (full context)