The Scarlet Pimpernel

by

Baroness Orczy

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Sir Andrew Ffoulkes Character Analysis

A member of the League of the Scarlet Pimpernel and a baronet of the British monarchy. Like the other Englishmen in The Scarlet Pimpernel, especially those of noble birth, Orczy portrays Sir Andrew as the epitome of British integrity and bravery. He helps the Scarlet Pimpernel save aristocrats from the Reign of Terror at great personal risk, and he expects no glory or appreciation in return. He is humble and kind and is proof of what Orczy considers to be the inherent goodness of the aristocracy and the superiority of the British in general. He is attacked along with Lord Anthony by Chauvelin and his men at “The Fisherman’s Rest,” at which time Chauvelin finds Armand St. Just’s “damning letter” that identifies St. Just as a supporter of the Scarlet Pimpernel and a traitor to France. Sir Andrew is unflinchingly loyal to the Scarlet Pimpernel, and he immediately agrees to help Lady Blakeney after she is forced by Chauvelin to betray the Scarlet Pimpernel. Sir Andrew escorts Lady Blakeney to Calais to warn the Scarlet Pimpernel when Chauvelin discovers his real identity as Sir Percy, and he follows his leader’s orders without question. At the end of the novel, Sir Andrew marries Suzanne de Tournay, a French aristocrat he helped escape the Reign of Terror, in a “brilliant” ceremony attended by the Prince of Wales.

Sir Andrew Ffoulkes Quotes in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The The Scarlet Pimpernel quotes below are all either spoken by Sir Andrew Ffoulkes or refer to Sir Andrew Ffoulkes. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Signet edition of The Scarlet Pimpernel published in 1974.
Chapter 4 Quotes

Lord Antony and Sir Andrew had said nothing to interrupt the Comtesse whilst she was speaking. There was no doubt that they felt deeply for her; their very silence testified to that—but in every century, and ever since England has been what it is, an Englishman has always felt somewhat ashamed of his own emotion and of his own sympathy. And so the two young men said nothing, and busied themselves in trying to hide their feelings, only succeeding in looking immeasurably sheepish.

Page Number: 30
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

She went up effusively to them both, with not a single touch of embarrassment in her manner or in her smile. Lord Tony and Sir Andrew watched the little scene with eager apprehension. English though they were, they had often been in France, and had mixed sufficiently with the French to realise the unbending hauteur, the bitter hatred with which the old noblesse of France viewed all those who had helped to contribute to their downfall. Armand St. Just, the brother of beautiful Lady Blakeney—though known to hold moderate and conciliatory views—was an ardent republican; his feud with the ancient family of St. Cyr—the rights and wrongs of which no outsider ever knew—had culminated in the downfall, the almost total extinction, of the latter.

Chapter 25 Quotes

She looked through the tattered curtain, across at the handsome face of her husband, in whose lazy blue eyes, and behind whose inane smile, she could now so plainly see the strength, energy, and resourcefulness which had caused the Scarlet Pimpernel to be reverenced and trusted by his followers. "There are nineteen of us is ready to lay down our lives for your husband, Lady Blakeney,” Sir Andrew had said to her; and as she looked at the forehead, low, but square and broad, the eyes, blue, yet deep-set and intense, the whole aspect of the man, of indomitable energy, hiding, behind a perfectly acted comedy, his almost superhuman strength of will and marvelous ingenuity, she understood the fascination which he exercised over his followers, for had he not also cast his spells over her heart and her imagination?

Page Number: 209
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Scarlet Pimpernel LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Scarlet Pimpernel PDF

Sir Andrew Ffoulkes Character Timeline in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The timeline below shows where the character Sir Andrew Ffoulkes appears in The Scarlet Pimpernel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: Dover: “The Fisherman’s Rest”
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...Jellyband?” asks one of the patrons, and he confirms that he is. Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew Ffoulkes are bringing dukes and duchesses over the Channel today, having escaped “the clutches of... (full context)
Chapter 3: The Refugees
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Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...and holds her “fine, aristocratic hands” to the fire. She looks to Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew Ffoulkes, who has just entered the room, with “unspeakable gratitude.” (full context)
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...the hearth. “So this is England,” she says, looking out the window with “childlike curiosity.” Sir Andrew smiles at the pretty young girl. The Comtesse’s son, the Vicomte de Tournay, joins his... (full context)
Chapter 4: The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel
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Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
As Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew sit down at the dinner table with the Comtesse and her children, the two strangers... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...as she and her children have. The Comtesse begins to cry, and Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew look on with compassion but say nothing. For as long as anyone can remember, Englishmen... (full context)
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“As for me, Monsieur,” Suzanne says to Sir Andrew , “I trust you absolutely and I know that you will bring my dear father... (full context)
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The Vicomte tells Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew that the women in France “have been more bitter against us aristocrats than the men,”... (full context)
Chapter 5: Marguerite
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...daughter. “Suzanne,” she says, sternly in English. “I forbid you to speak to that woman.” Sir Andrew and Lord Anthony “gasp with horror at this foreign insolence” and wait for the lady... (full context)
Chapter 6: An Exquisite of ‘92
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...brother in another room and shoots Sir Percy a “slightly contemptuous glance” as she leaves. Sir Andrew watches as Sir Percy stares at his wife with a “curious look of intense longing”... (full context)
Chapter 9: The Outrage
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Later that night, after everyone has left “The Fisherman’s Rest,” Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew sit in front of the fire. “I need not ask, I suppose,” Lord Tony says,... (full context)
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“[The Scarlet Pimpernel] wants you and Hastings to meet him in Calais,” Sir Andrew says to Lord Anthony, “for the case of the Comte de Tournay.” Sir Andrew tells... (full context)
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As Sir Andrew and Lord Anthony are distracted, a man slips from beneath a bench and creeps closer.... (full context)
Chapter 10: In the Opera Box
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Chauvelin tells Lady Blakeney about his recent attack on Sir Andrew and Lord Anthony. Several letters and important papers were found among Sir Andrew’s things, including... (full context)
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One of the letters in Sir Andrew ’s possession had been signed with a small drawing of a Scarlet Pimpernel and claimed... (full context)
Chapter 12: The Scrap of Paper
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As Lady Blakeney wanders about the ball, she notices Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew , who both look “a little haggard and anxious.” From what Suzanne had said at... (full context)
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As she watches Sir Andrew retreat into the boudoir, Lady Blakeney “suddenly ceases to exist” and is replaced by Marguerite... (full context)
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“Whichever it is, Lady Blakeney, this little note is undoubtedly mine,” Sir Andrew says as he takes the paper from her hands. Lady Blakeney steps backward, knocking over... (full context)
Chapter 13: Either—Or?
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Lady Blakeney only managed to make out a few words before Sir Andrew snatched back the paper, but she is sure that she read “start myself to-morrow” and... (full context)
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During Lady Blakeney’s dance with Sir Andrew , he says nothing of the incident in the boudoir and is a perfect gentleman.... (full context)
Chapter 14: One O’clock Precisely!
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...room. “You have news for me?” he asks. Lady Blakeney quickly recaps her meeting with Sir Andrew , the mysterious paper he burned, and the few words she was able to decipher.... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
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...is, after all, a ball. Of course, says Chauvelin, but he has also learned (through Sir Andrew ’s letters) that the Scarlet Pimpernel will be leaving for France tomorrow and is headed... (full context)
Chapter 16: Richmond
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...—Armand is in deadly danger,” she says and quickly tells him about Armand’s letter to Sir Andrew Ffoulkes. As Lady Blakeney speaks her brother’s name, Sir Percy’s face grows “a shade more... (full context)
Chapter 19: The Scarlet Pimpernel
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...and gives Lady Blakeney an envelope. She tears it open and finds Armand’s letter to Sir Andrew . The groom claims that a “runner” has just dropped it off, and the envelope... (full context)
Chapter 20: The Friend
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Lady Blakeney has her servant drive her to Sir Andrew ’s house in Pall Mall, where she tells him about Chauvelin and that he is... (full context)
Chapter 21: Suspense
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...of the tide,” Lady Blakeney tells Jellyband, but in the meantime, she is waiting for Sir Andrew . “Honest” Mr. Jellyband wonders why Lady Blakeney is meeting Sir Andrew in Dover in... (full context)
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...to Dover, and the coachmen saw no one either. She hears a noise outside as Sir Andrew arrives on horseback, “almost unrecognizable in his lacquey-like garb.” He joins her in the coffee-room... (full context)
Chapter 22: Calais
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...stranded in Dover for nearly two days on account of the storm, Lady Blakeney and Sir Andrew (in disguise) finally charter a boat across the Channel. The “fresh sea-air revives” Lady Blakeney,... (full context)
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Sir Andrew leads Lady Blakeney to the “Chat Gris,” a “small wayside inn on the outskirts of... (full context)
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Sir Andrew assures Lady Blakeney they are in the right place. The man who let them in,... (full context)
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“Tall Englishman?” Brogard asks. “To-day! —Yes.” Sir Andrew and Lady Blakeney immediately stop eating. Brogard continues. “He went…yes…but he’s coming back…here—he ordered supper…”... (full context)
Chapter 23: Hope
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Lady Blakeney is relieved that Sir Percy is safe and headed for the “Chat Gris.” Sir Andrew , however, is not so happy. He failed to tell Lady Blakeney before, but he... (full context)
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Lady Blakeney suggests Sir Andrew take a “voyage of reconnaissance in the village,” and she offers to remain at the... (full context)
Chapter 24: The Death-Trap
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...his new patrons “with even more withering contempt than had bestowed upon” Lady Blakeney and Sir Andrew . “Sacré soutane!” he mutters quietly. Although Lady Blakeney cannot see their faces, she knows... (full context)
Chapter 31: The Escape
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Lady Blakeney has forgotten all about Sir Andrew as well. Sir Percy had run into him back in Calais, before meeting Chauvelin at... (full context)
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...so much suffering, yet found at last a great and lasting happiness.” The wedding of Sir Andrew Ffoulkes to Mlle. Suzanne de Tournay is the social event of the season, and M.... (full context)