The Scarlet Pimpernel

by

Baroness Orczy

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The Comte de Tournay de Basserive Character Analysis

The Comtesse de Tournay’s husband and father to the Vicomte and Suzanne. Very little is known about the Comte other than he is an aristocrat and has been sentenced to die by the French Republic. The Scarlet Pimpernel goes back to France to rescue the Comte after he successfully rescues the Comte’s family, and most of the novel revolves around this attempt. The Comte is ultimately saved and joins his family in England.
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The Comte de Tournay de Basserive Character Timeline in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The timeline below shows where the character The Comte de Tournay de Basserive appears in The Scarlet Pimpernel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4: The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
As Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew sit down at the dinner table with the Comtesse and her children, the two strangers sitting near the back of the coffee-room slip out... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
“And to M. le Comte de Tournay de Basserive,” Lord Anthony says raising his glass again. “May we welcome him... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
...“humble tool” to his “great leader.” Someone else entirely is responsible for their escape. The Comtesse asks to meet him at once so that she can thank him personally, but Lord... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
The Comtesse asks Lord Anthony why they risk their lives to save poor French aristocrats. “Sport, Madame... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...women in France “have been more bitter against us aristocrats than the men,” and the Comtesse agrees. One woman, Marguerite St. Just, had “denounced the Marquis de St. Cyr and all... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...friends with the Prince of Wales and together they “lead both fashion and society.” The Comtesse shudders. “I pray God that while I remain in this beautiful country, I may never... (full context)
Chapter 9: The Outrage
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...ago. The Scarlet Pimpernel had crossed the Channel before they did, but he escorted the Comtesse and her children all the way from Paris dressed like the old hag. (full context)
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...meet him in Calais,” Sir Andrew says to Lord Anthony, “for the case of the Comte de Tournay.” Sir Andrew tells Lord Tony that France has “sent an accredited agent,” a... (full context)
Chapter 10: In the Opera Box
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...loiters outside the box and notices all the English eyes staring at his guest. The Comtesse de Tournay and her children approach, as well as Lady Portarles, a member of British... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
“Ah, Monsieur,” the Comtesse cries, “and my poor husband still in that awful country.” Lord Grenville assures the Comtesse... (full context)
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“I am sure,” the Comtesse says, “that if this Chauvelin wishes to do us mischief, he will find a faithful... (full context)
Chapter 11: Lord Grenville’s Ball
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...present to Your Royal Highness,” Lord Grenville says, leading the Prince of Wales to the Comtesse de Tournay. “This is a pleasure, Madame,” the Prince says to the Comtesse, “my father,... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
The Comtesse, whose “respect of royalty amounts almost to a religion,” bows “ceremoniously.” Lady Blakeney does the... (full context)
Chapter 19: The Scarlet Pimpernel
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...the two women embrace. Suzanne begins to immediately talk about France and her father, the Comte’s, upcoming escape. “Oh, we have no fear now!” Suzanne claims. “You don’t know, chérie, that... (full context)
Chapter 20: The Friend
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...he is heading to Calais to intercept Sir Percy as he attempts to rescue the Comte de Tournay. “Will you tell me,” Sir Andrew asks, “whose hand helped to guide M.... (full context)
Chapter 23: Hope
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...head there straight away. Plus, Sir Andrew says, there is still the case of the Comte de Tournay to deal with, and Armand. There is no way the Scarlet Pimpernel will... (full context)
Chapter 27: On the Track
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...windows, it was discovered that the men, most likely, are Armand St. Just and the Comte de Tournay. Four soldiers have stayed behind and are presently spying on the hut from... (full context)
Chapter 28: The Père Blanchard’s Hut
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If Armand and the Comte are alone, Chauvelin continues, the men are to warn one another and take cover. They... (full context)
Chapter 29: Trapped
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...fine-tune their plans. There are now two additional men—strangers—inside the hut with Armand and the Comte, and a yacht is anchored out at sea. The ship is obviously English, and the... (full context)
Chapter 31: The Escape
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Loyalty Theme Icon
...the ball. “But Armand…” she remembers. Safely aboard the Day Dream, Percy says, with the Comte de Tournay. (full context)