The Scarlet Pimpernel

by

Baroness Orczy

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The Scarlet Pimpernel / Sir Percy Blakeney, Bart. / The Hag / The Jew Character Analysis

Lady Blakeney’s husband and the protagonist of The Scarlet Pimpernel. Sir Percy is a baronet in the British aristocracy and is “the richest man in England.” He is like every other Blakeney who came before him: “notoriously dull.” Just shy of thirty years old, Sir Percy is uncommonly tall and “massively built,” and he would be “usually good looking” if not for his “lazy” eyes and “perpetual inane laugh.” He is popular, however, and with his wife, Lady Blakeney, he leads British high society. Yet in his private life, Sir Percy is miserable. Lady Blakeney is highly intelligent, and she resents her shallow and “brainless” husband. Sir Percy isn’t really “stupid,” of course, and is just feigning foolishness to cover up his identity as the Scarlet Pimpernel. Disguised as the Scarlet Pimpernel, Sir Percy heroically saves nobles from the guillotine and the Reign of Terror in France. Percy’s actions as the Pimpernel reflect his deep pride in his aristocratic heritage, which is “stung to the quick” when he learns of Lady Blakeney’s involvement in the death of the Marquis de St. Cyr and his family. Despite this, Sir Percy deeply loves his wife, but he buries his love behind “a mask worn to hide the bitter wound she had dealt” his faith and love. Lady Blakeney again betrays her husband when she unwittingly helps Chauvelin identify Sir Percy as the Scarlet Pimpernel, and it isn’t until she goes to France to save him that Sir Percy believes his wife has atoned for all her sins. Lady Blakeney’s efforts in Calais prove her love and devotion to Sir Percy and the aristocracy, and he is again able to truly love her. Through the character of Sir Percy and the Scarlet Pimpernel, Orczy simultaneously argues the value of humility and reinforces her belief in the inherent goodness of the aristocracy and the superiority of the British. As Sir Percy, Orczy’s protagonist is “dull” and forgettable, but as the Scarlet Pimpernel, Sir Percy is “the bravest gentlemen in all the world.” He is selfless and heroic and undeniably the “most British Britisher.”

The Scarlet Pimpernel / Sir Percy Blakeney, Bart. / The Hag / The Jew Quotes in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The The Scarlet Pimpernel quotes below are all either spoken by The Scarlet Pimpernel / Sir Percy Blakeney, Bart. / The Hag / The Jew or refer to The Scarlet Pimpernel / Sir Percy Blakeney, Bart. / The Hag / The Jew. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Signet edition of The Scarlet Pimpernel published in 1974.
Chapter 6 Quotes

Sir Percy Blakeney had travelled a great deal abroad, before he brought home his beautiful, young French wife. The fashionable circles of the time were ready to receive them both with open arms; Sir Percy was rich, his wife was accomplished, the Prince of Wales took a very great liking to them both. Within six months they were the acknowledged leaders of fashion and of style. Sir Percy’s coats were the talk of the town, his inanities were quoted, his foolish laugh copied by the gilded youth at Almack’s or the Mall. Everyone knew that he was hopelessly stupid, but then that was scarcely to be wondered at, seeing that all the Blakeneys for generations had been notoriously dull, and that his mother had died an imbecile.

Page Number: 44-5
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

She had but little real sympathy with those haughty French aristocrats, insolent in their pride of caste, of whom the Comtesse de Tournay de Basserive was so typical an example; but, republican and liberal-minded though she was from principle, she hated and loathed the methods which the young Republic had chosen for establishing itself. She had not been in Paris for some months; the horrors and bloodshed of the Reign of Terror, culminating in the September massacres, had only come across the Channel to her as a faint echo. Robespierre, Danton, Marat, she had not known in their new guise of bloody justiciaries, merciless wielders of the guillotine. Her very soul recoiled in horror from these excesses, to which she feared her brother Armand—moderate republican as he was—might become one day the holocaust.

Related Symbols: The Guillotine
Page Number: 67-8
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

“I am sure,” said the Comtesse, pursing up her thin lips, "that if this Chauvelin wishes to do us mischief, he will find a faithful ally in Lady Blakeney.”

“Bless the woman!” ejaculated Lady Portarles; “did ever anyone see such perversity? My Lord Grenville, you have the gift of the gab—will you please explain to Madame la Comtesse that she is acting like a fool? In your position here in England, Madame,” she added, turning a wrathful and resolute face towards the Comtesse, “you cannot afford to put on the hoity-toity airs you French aristocrats are so fond of. Lady Blakeney may or may not be in sympathy with those Ruffians in France; she may or may not have had anything to do with the arrest and condemnation of St. Cyr, or whatever the man’s name is, but she is the leader of fashion in this country; Sir Percy Blakeney has more money than any half-dozen other men put together, he is hand and glove with royalty, and your trying to snub Lady Blakeney will not harm her, but will make you look a fool. Isn’t that so, my lord?”

Chapter 16 Quotes

"Listen to the tale, Sir Percy,” she said, and her voice now was low, sweet, infinitely tender. "Armand was all in all to me! We had no parents, and brought one another up. He was my little father, and I, his tiny mother; we loved one another so. Then one day—do you mind me, Sir Percy? The Marquis de St. Cyr had my brother Armand thrashed— thrashed by his lacqueys—that brother whom I loved better than all the world! And his offence? That he, a plebeian, had dared to love the daughter of the aristocrat; for that he was waylaid and thrashed ... thrashed like a dog within an inch of his life! Oh, how I suffered! His humiliation had eaten into my very soul! When the opportunity occurred, and I was able to take my revenge, I took it. But I only thought to bring that proud marquis to trouble and humiliation. He plotted with Austria against his own country. Chance gave me knowledge of this; I spoke of it, but I did not know—how could I guess?—they trapped and duped me. When I realised what I had done, it was too late.”

Page Number: 135
Explanation and Analysis:

He stood aside to allow her to pass. She sighed, a quick sigh of disappointment. His pride and her beauty had been in direct conflict, and his pride had remained the conqueror. Perhaps, after all, she had been deceived just now; what she took to be the light of love in his eyes might only have been the passion of pride or, who knows, of hatred instead of love. She stood looking at him for a moment or two longer. He was again as rigid, as impassive, as before. Pride had conquered, and he cared naught for her. The grey of dawn was gradually yielding to the rosy light of the rising sun. Birds began to twitter; Nature awakened, smiling in happy response to the warmth of this glorious October morning. Only between these two hearts there lay a strong, impassable barrier, built up of pride on both sides, which neither of them cared to be the first to demolish.

Page Number: 139
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 17 Quotes

How strange it all was! She loved him still. And now that she looked back upon the last few months of misunderstandings and of loneliness, she realised that she had never ceased to love him; that deep down in her heart she had always vaguely felt that his foolish inanities, his empty laugh, his lazy nonchalance were nothing but a mask; that the real man, strong, passionate, willful, was there still—the man she had loved, whose intensity had fascinated her, whose personality attracted her, since she always felt that behind his apparently slow wits there was a certain something, which he kept hidden from all the world, and most especially from her.

Page Number: 142
Explanation and Analysis:

She felt no longer anxious about Armand. The man who had just ridden away, bent on helping her brother, inspired her with complete confidence in his strength and in his power. She marveled at herself for having ever looked upon him as an inane fool; of course, that was a mask worn to hide the bitter wound she had dealt to his faith and to his love. His passion would have overmastered him, and he would not let her see how much he still cared and how deeply he suffered.

Page Number: 147
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 18 Quotes

Since she had entered this neat, orderly room, she had been taken so much by surprise, that this obvious proof of her husband’s strong business capacities did not cause her more than a passing thought of wonder. But it also strengthened her in the now certain knowledge that, with his worldly inanities, his foppish ways, and foolish talk, he was not only wearing a mask, but was playing a deliberate and studied part.

Marguerite wondered again. Why should he take all this trouble? Why should he—who was obviously a serious, earnest man—wish to appear before his fellow-men as an empty-headed nincompoop?

He may have wished to hide his love for a wife who held him in contempt... but surely such an object could have been gained at less sacrifice, and with far less trouble than constant incessant acting of an unnatural part.

Page Number: 152-3
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 19 Quotes

The mask of the inane fop had been a good one, and the part consummately well played. No wonder that Chauvelin’s spies had failed to detect, in the apparently brainless nincompoop, the man whose reckless daring and resourceful ingenuity had baffled the keenest French spies, both in France and in England. Even last night when Chauvelin went to Lord Grenville’s dining-room to seek that daring Scarlet Pimpernel, he only saw that inane Sir Percy Blakeney fast asleep in a corner sofa.

Page Number: 158
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 25 Quotes

She looked through the tattered curtain, across at the handsome face of her husband, in whose lazy blue eyes, and behind whose inane smile, she could now so plainly see the strength, energy, and resourcefulness which had caused the Scarlet Pimpernel to be reverenced and trusted by his followers. "There are nineteen of us is ready to lay down our lives for your husband, Lady Blakeney,” Sir Andrew had said to her; and as she looked at the forehead, low, but square and broad, the eyes, blue, yet deep-set and intense, the whole aspect of the man, of indomitable energy, hiding, behind a perfectly acted comedy, his almost superhuman strength of will and marvelous ingenuity, she understood the fascination which he exercised over his followers, for had he not also cast his spells over her heart and her imagination?

Page Number: 209
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 30 Quotes

He certainly felt exceedingly vicious, and since he had no reasonable grounds for venting his ill-humour on the soldiers who had but too punctually obeyed his orders, he felt that the son of the despised race would prove an excellent butt. With true French contempt of the Jew, which has survived the lapse of centuries even to this day, he would not go too near him, but said with biting sarcasm, as the wretched old man was brought in full light of the moon by the two soldiers, —

“I suppose now, that being a Jew, you have a good memory for bargains?”

Page Number: 254
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 31 Quotes

“Dressed as the dirty old Jew," he said gaily, “I knew I should not be recognised. I had met Reuben Goldstein in Calais earlier in the evening. For a few gold pieces he supplied me with this rig-out, and undertook to bury himself out of sight of everybody, whilst he lent me his cart and nag.”

“But if Chauvelin had discovered you,” she gasped excitedly, “your disguise was good ... but he is so sharp.”

“Odd’s fish!” he rejoined quietly, “then certainly the game would have been up. I could but take the risk. I know human nature pretty well by now,” he added, with a note of sadness in his cheery, young voice, “and I know these Frenchmen out and out. They so loathe a Jew, that they never come nearer than a couple of yards of him, and begad! I fancy that I contrived to make myself look about as loathsome an object as it is possible to conceive.”

Page Number: 264
Explanation and Analysis:

All his fatigue was forgotten; his shoulders must have been very sore, for the soldiers had hit hard, but the man’s muscles seemed made of steel, and his energy was almost supernatural. It was a weary tramp, half a league along the stony side of the cliffs, but never for a moment did his courage give way or his muscles yield to fatigue. On he tramped, with firm footstep, his vigorous arms encircling the precious burden, and... no doubt, as she lay, quiet and happy, at times lulled to momentary drowsiness, at others watching, through the slowly gathering morning light, the pleasant face with the lazy, drooping blue eyes, ever cheerful, ever illumined with a good-humoured smile, she whispered many things, which helped to shorten the weary road, and acted as a soothing balsam to his aching sinews.

Page Number: 268
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Scarlet Pimpernel / Sir Percy Blakeney, Bart. / The Hag / The Jew Character Timeline in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The timeline below shows where the character The Scarlet Pimpernel / Sir Percy Blakeney, Bart. / The Hag / The Jew appears in The Scarlet Pimpernel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Paris: September, 1792
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...each “brief notice” in red with “a little star-shaped flower,” known in England as a Scarlet Pimpernel . The Englishman has proven himself exceedingly elusive, and France has promised five thousand francs... (full context)
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Everyone assumes that Bibot will be the one to catch the Scarlet Pimpernel . The Englishman’s disguises have become increasingly brilliant, and he even tricked Grospierre, a guard... (full context)
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...barricades daily, bringing crops to market from the countryside, and most are driven by “horrible hags.” An old hag, whom Bibot remembers seeing earlier in the day, approaches the barricade. She... (full context)
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Minutes later, a guard anxiously approaches Bibot, looking for the hag and her cart. Comtesse de Tournay and her children are hiding in the cart, the... (full context)
Chapter 3: The Refugees
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...Jellyband tells Lord Anthony that he is not expecting any other guests, except for Sir Percy Blakeney and his wife, Lady Blakeney, but they won’t be staying long. Lady Blakeney’s brother,... (full context)
Chapter 4: The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel
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...personally, but Lord Anthony tells her that won’t be possible. “Why?” she asks. “Because the Scarlet Pimpernel works in the dark, and his identity is only known under a solemn oath of... (full context)
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...guillotine for sport. She asks Lord Tony how many men are in league with the Scarlet Pimpernel . “Twenty all told,” he answers, “one to command, and nineteen to obey.” (full context)
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“Know her?” says Lord Anthony. Lady Blakeney is married to Sir Percy, “the richest man in England,” and she is “the most fashionable woman in London.” They... (full context)
Chapter 6: An Exquisite of ‘92
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Sir Percy Blakeney, Bart., is “still a year or two on the right side of thirty.” He... (full context)
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...Paris like a shining comet” trailed by handsome, eligible men. When she abruptly married Sir Percy, others viewed it as “artistic eccentricity” that “the cleverest woman in Europe” had fallen in... (full context)
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Sir Percy has been “universally voted to be totally unqualified for the onerous post he had taken”... (full context)
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Everyone knows that Sir Percy is “hopelessly stupid.” The Blakeneys have been known to be “notoriously dull” for generations, but... (full context)
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“La!” yells Sir Percy as he enters the coffee-room, “how sheepish you all look…. What’s up?” Marguerite looks to... (full context)
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Sir Percy points to the Vicomte’s sword. “What the devil is that?” he asks. “My sword, Monsieur,”... (full context)
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...his sword. “If I have done wrong, I withdraw myself,” he says. “Aye, do!” Sir Percy says and then yells to Mr. Jellyband for a drink. Lady Blakeney says there’s no... (full context)
Chapter 7: The Secret Orchard
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...safe in England. “I have only you,” she says. Armand reminds his sister that Sir Percy loves her. “He did…once…,” she says. (full context)
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Armand asks Marguerite if Sir Percy knows about “the part [she] played” in the capture of the Marquis de St. Cyr.... (full context)
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When Sir Percy and Marguerite first met, he “seemed to worship [her] with a curious intensity of concentrated... (full context)
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Armand is confused by his sister’s heartache. Sir Percy has always loved Marguerite more than she loved him, but now it seems that “with... (full context)
Chapter 8: The Accredited Agent
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As Armand sails away, Marguerite stands and watches him disappear. Sir Percy leaves her to her thoughts and doesn’t bother her. Sir Percy always has “the delicacy... (full context)
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Just one day after Sir Percy and Marguerite were married, she told him how she had “inadvertently” contributed to the death... (full context)
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...She made “a full confession” to her husband, but it made little difference. Now, Sir Percy “seems to have laid aside his love for her, as he would an ill-fitting glove.” (full context)
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“Have you ever heard of the Scarlet Pimpernel ?” Chauvelin asks. Of course, Marguerite has heard of him—everyone in England has. Clothing, food,... (full context)
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...French aristocrats, but she “hates and loathes” the way the Republic is “establishing itself.” The Scarlet Pimpernel and his league of men save others “for sheer love of their fellow-men,” and she... (full context)
Chapter 9: The Outrage
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...escorted the Comtesse and her children all the way from Paris dressed like the old hag. (full context)
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“[The Scarlet Pimpernel ] wants you and Hastings to meet him in Calais,” Sir Andrew says to Lord... (full context)
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...Chauvelin smirks. “Now, fair Marguerite, I think that you will help me to find the Scarlet Pimpernel .” (full context)
Chapter 10: In the Opera Box
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...my poor husband still in that awful country.” Lord Grenville assures the Comtesse that the Scarlet Pimpernel and his men will get the Comte out soon enough. “Ah!” he says, “if I... (full context)
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...regardless of what Lady Blakeney did or said in France, in England she is Sir Percy’s wife and deserves respect. “In your position here in England, Madame,” Lady Portarles says, “you... (full context)
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Lord Grenville returns to his opera box just as Sir Percy and Lady Blakeney arrive. Sir Percy mingles with the crowd, and Chauvelin watches as Lady... (full context)
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...with the enemies of France, but actually a helper, if not a member” of the Scarlet Pimpernel ’s league of men. Chauvelin tells Lady Blakeney that she can “win a free pardon... (full context)
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...the letters in Sir Andrew’s possession had been signed with a small drawing of a Scarlet Pimpernel and claimed that the writer would “be at G.’s ball.” Chauvelin smiles. “The Scarlet Pimpernel,”... (full context)
Chapter 11: Lord Grenville’s Ball
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...long before the Prince of Wales arrives with Lady Blakeney on his arm and Sir Percy not far behind. (full context)
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...leetle boy then…I now I owe the honour of this meeting to our protector, the Scarlet Pimpernel .” The Prince immediately silences him, looking in the direction of Chauvelin. “Nay, Monseigneur,” Chauvelin... (full context)
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...The Prince tells Chauvelin that his “lips are sealed,” and that those who know the Scarlet Pimpernel are sworn to absolute secrecy. Outside of these trusted men, no one knows anything about... (full context)
Chapter 12: The Scrap of Paper
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...Her nerves have been on edge since meeting Chauvelin at the opera, and now Sir Percy is “surrounded by a crowd of brainless, empty-headed young fops,” loudly laughing and joking. Sir... (full context)
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...about the ball, she notices Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew, who both look “a little haggard and anxious.” From what Suzanne had said at the opera, the Scarlet Pimpernel has no... (full context)
Chapter 14: One O’clock Precisely!
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...predicament. She will tell Chauvelin what she has discovered, save Armand, and “let that cunning Scarlet Pimpernel extricate himself after that.” Soon, Chauvelin slips quietly into the room. “You have news for... (full context)
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...Of course, says Chauvelin, but he has also learned (through Sir Andrew’s letters) that the Scarlet Pimpernel will be leaving for France tomorrow and is headed to an inn called “Le Chat... (full context)
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...ball upstairs. He walks about the deserted room, trying to appear casual, and notices Sir Percy sleeping soundly on a sofa in a dark corner. He watches Sir Percy sleep— “his... (full context)
Chapter 15: Doubt
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...the dining-room. After several minutes, a cabinet member Lady Blakeney had sent to find Sir Percy appears. He had been unable to find him at first, but then he found him... (full context)
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...is waiting at the door. He takes Lady Blakeney’s arm and guides her to Sir Percy waiting at the reigns. “I must know what has happened,” she whispers to Chauvelin. He... (full context)
Chapter 16: Richmond
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Despite the stress of the evening, Lady Blakeney enjoys the short ride home. Sir Percy is sure at the reigns and rarely speaks as he drives, which affords Lady Blakeney... (full context)
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Suddenly, Lady Blakeney feels an “intense sympathy” for Sir Percy. The events of the last several hours have left her feeling vulnerable, and she thinks... (full context)
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After Sir Percy and Lady Blakeney arrive at their “palatial” estate by the river, Lady Blakeney heads for... (full context)
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“Nay, Madame,” Sir Percy replies, “but ‘tis on the other foot the shoe happens to be.” He tells Lady... (full context)
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Percy!” Lady Blakeney yells. “I entreat you!” She reminds him of early in their courtship, when... (full context)
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...myself told you the truth of that odious tale,” Lady Blakeney says. Yes, admits Sir Percy, but not until after he had already heard all the “horrible details” from others. Lady... (full context)
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“Listen to the tale, Sir Percy,” Lady Blakeney begs, as she tells him all about the Marquis de St. Cyr and... (full context)
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“I entreated you for an explanation,” Sir Percy says to Lady Blakeney. “I fancy that you refused me all explanation then, and demanded... (full context)
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Standing close to Sir Percy, Lady Blakeney can feel his eyes upon her in the darkness, but he will “not... (full context)
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Sir Percy finally agrees to help Armand. “I pledge you my word that he shall be safe,”... (full context)
Chapter 17: Farewell
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...but does not sleep. Despite her worry for Armand, Lady Blakeney thinks only of Sir Percy, and her “limbs seem to ache with longing for the love a man who had... (full context)
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...opens it and finds an envelope at her feet. Inside is a letter from Sir Percy. Business has called him North and he must leave at once. Sir Percy owns a... (full context)
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“You are going?” Lady Blakeney asks Sir Percy. “Whither?” He tells her that, like his letter said, his presence is required in the... (full context)
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As Lady Blakeney watches Sir Percy drive away, she is “no longer anxious about Armand.” She can’t believe she ever thought... (full context)
Chapter 18: The Mysterious Device
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By the time Lady Blakeney wakes, it is late in the morning. Sir Percy’s groom has returned with his master’s horse and claims that Sir Percy boarded his yacht... (full context)
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To one side sits Sir Percy’s office, which is off-limits to everyone except his private valet. Lady Blakeney notices the door... (full context)
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...he take all this trouble?” Lady Blakeney asks herself as she studies the room. Sir Percy’s office “obviously” belongs to “a serious, earnest man,” so why does he wish to appear... (full context)
Chapter 19: The Scarlet Pimpernel
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...pay homage to the Scarlet Pimpernel in this way, so it is believable that Sir Percy has as well, which explains the ring. (full context)
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...have no fear now!” Suzanne claims. “You don’t know, chérie, that that great and noble Scarlet Pimpernel himself has gone to save papa,” she continues. “He was in London this morning; he... (full context)
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...she could “have been so blind.” She understands now, “all at once,” the “part [Sir Percy] played—the mask he wore”—was nothing but a ruse to “throw dust in everybody’s eyes.” Maybe,... (full context)
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...to be alone and Suzanne agrees and begins to walk away. As she does, Sir Percy’s groom appears and gives Lady Blakeney an envelope. She tears it open and finds Armand’s... (full context)
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Alone in the garden, Lady Blakeney curses herself for not noticing that Sir Percy is “wearing a mask.” Now, she wishes she had “torn it from his face.” Marguerite’s... (full context)
Chapter 20: The Friend
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...The fact that Chauvelin sent her Armand’s letter means that he too has discovered Sir Percy’s identity as the Scarlet Pimpernel. She has “betrayed [her husband] to his enemy—unwittingly ‘tis true—but... (full context)
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...she tells him about Chauvelin and that he is heading to Calais to intercept Sir Percy as he attempts to rescue the Comte de Tournay. “Will you tell me,” Sir Andrew... (full context)
Chapter 23: Hope
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Lady Blakeney is relieved that Sir Percy is safe and headed for the “Chat Gris.” Sir Andrew, however, is not so happy.... (full context)
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...the village,” and she offers to remain at the “Chat Gris” and wait should Sir Percy return. Perhaps then they can save some valuable time and evade Chauvelin. Sir Andrew agrees... (full context)
Chapter 24: The Death-Trap
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...making the place look a trifle less uninviting.” Obviously, Lady Blakeney thinks, it is “for Percy that this semblance of supper is being” prepared, and she smiles to herself. Evidently, Brogard... (full context)
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Lady Blakeney hears footsteps outside the inn, and hopes that it is Sir Percy, but then she hears another set of footsteps that tells her this new customer is... (full context)
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Lady Blakeney’s high spirit begins to dissipate. For Sir Percy, escape will surely be “impossible.” Chauvelin’s “plans are well laid,” and it seems he has... (full context)
Chapter 25: The Eagle and the Fox
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Lady Blakeney’s “breath stops short” at the sound of what she is sure is Sir Percy’s singing. “Long to reign over us,” the voice continues singing outside. “God save the King!”... (full context)
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“I didn’t know,” Sir Percy says to Chauvelin with a smile, “that you…er…were in holy orders.” Chauvelin is speechless. “But,... (full context)
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Chauvelin sits uncomfortably, looking repeatedly at his watch. “You are expecting a friend, maybe?” Sir Percy asks. Chauvelin quickly says yes. “Not a lady—I trust,” Sir Percy jokes, “surely the holy... (full context)
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Chauvelin accepts Sir Percy’s offer of a pinch of snuff, and upon placing it in his mouth, thinks “his... (full context)
Chapter 26: The Jew
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...he has more news as well. A “tall Englishman” was seen talking to an old Jewish man, Reuben Goldstein, in the village not an hour before. Chauvelin orders Desgas to bring... (full context)
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...Desgas says. “You know something of my friend, the tall Englishman,” Chauvelin asks the old Jew. “Morbleu!” he adds, “keep your distance, man.” The Jew tells Chauvelin that another man has... (full context)
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Chauvelin asks the Jew if he knows what direction the Englishman is heading. “To a place called the Père... (full context)
Chapter 27: On the Track
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Lady Blakeney hears Desgas outside shouting orders, and then she hears the Jew’s old cart drive down the bumpy road. After waiting a few more minutes, she slips... (full context)
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...the cart. One of the soldiers tells Chauvelin that they have seen nothing of the Scarlet Pimpernel . “Every stranger on these roads or on the beach must be shadowed, especially if... (full context)
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The soldier then tells Chauvelin that while they have not seen the Scarlet Pimpernel , they do believe that they have found Père Blanchard’s hut. Two men—one old and... (full context)
Chapter 28: The Père Blanchard’s Hut
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...the Republic never forgets an order.” Chauvelin tells them that if they should find the Scarlet Pimpernel in the hut, they should “give a sharp, quick whistle” only, and then surround the... (full context)
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...to-night,” Chauvelin says. “You shall be implicitly obeyed, citoyen,” Desgas says, but “what about the Jew?” Chauvelin has forgotten all about the dirty old man. (full context)
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Chauvelin turns to the Jew. “Here, you…Aaron, Moses, Abraham, or whatever your confounded name may be,” he says. The old... (full context)
Chapter 29: Trapped
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...that the soldiers will wait for the Scarlet Pimpernel to overtake the men. “And the Jew?” Chauvelin asks. “He’s gagged, and his legs strapped together,” the man reports. “He cannot move... (full context)
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...instructions. Chauvelin again gives Lady Blakeney an “either—or” proposition. “Either” she allows her husband, the Scarlet Pimpernel , to walk unknowingly into a deadly trap, “or” her brother will die before her... (full context)
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...Blakeney remains silent. She tries frantically to conceive of a plan to save Armand, Sir Percy, and everyone else, but she comes up empty. It is “impossible that she, Marguerite Blakeney,... (full context)
Chapter 30: The Schooner
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...God’s sake fire! Your leader is near! He is coming! He is betrayed!” she yells. “Percy, my husband, for God’s sake fly!” Chauvelin can “hardly refrain from striking her” and orders... (full context)
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...are now, presumably, safely aboard the Day Dream, which is headed out to sea. The Scarlet Pimpernel has “completely outwitted” Chauvelin, and a “superstitious shudder passes through him” as he thinks about... (full context)
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...of the men to read it, and it proves to be correspondence signed by the Scarlet Pimpernel to his men. “I cannot quite reach you,” the letter reads. The Scarlet Pimpernel orders... (full context)
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...question and offers to take them there at once. Chauvelin looks around. “Where is the Jew?” he asks. The men motion toward the dirty old man, scared and cowering on the... (full context)
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“I suppose now, that being a Jew, you have a good memory for bargains,” Chauvelin says to the Jew. Chauvelin reminds him... (full context)
Chapter 31: The Escape
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...sound of a good, solid, absolutely British ‘Damn!’” breaks the near silence. “Odd’s life!” Sir Percy yells, “but I wish those demmed fellows had not hit quite so hard!” Lady Blakeney... (full context)
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Percy!” yells Lady Blakeney. “I am here! Come to me!” Sir Percy is still tied up,... (full context)
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Percy,” Lady Blakeney says, “if you only knew…” Sir Percy looks at his wife tenderly. “I... (full context)
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Lady Blakeney has forgotten all about Sir Andrew as well. Sir Percy had run into him back in Calais, before meeting Chauvelin at the “Chat Gris.” Percy... (full context)
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“The boat of the Day Dream?” Marguerite asks. Sir Percy laughs. When he slipped instructions for Armand into the hut, Percy gave him a second... (full context)