The Scarlet Pimpernel

by

Baroness Orczy

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The Vicomte de Tournay Character Analysis

The son of the Comte and Comtesse de Tournay and brother to Suzanne. The Vicomte is rescued by the Scarlet Pimpernel and brought to England to escape execution during the Reign of Terror. He is described as young and “foppish,” and he is the personification of French passion. Sir Anthony refers to the Vicomte as an “abandoned young reprobate” and reminds him that England is no place for his “loose foreign ways.” The Vicomte even challenges Sir Percy to a duel after Marguerite insults the Comtesse. While he is obviously an aristocrat and therefore deserving of respect according to Orczy, the Vicomte is still French, and Orczy portrays him as driven by passion and emotion, the exact opposite of the stereotypical English restraint she favors in the novel.
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The Vicomte de Tournay Character Timeline in The Scarlet Pimpernel

The timeline below shows where the character The Vicomte de Tournay appears in The Scarlet Pimpernel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3: The Refugees
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...with “childlike curiosity.” Sir Andrew smiles at the pretty young girl. The Comtesse’s son, the Vicomte de Tournay, joins his family in the coffee-room and immediately takes note of pretty Sally... (full context)
Chapter 4: The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...and slides unnoticed under an oak bench. “Alone, at last!” Lord Anthony shouts, and the Vicomte raises his glass in a toast. “To his Majesty George Three of England,” he says.... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
The Vicomte tells Lord Anthony and Sir Andrew that the women in France “have been more bitter... (full context)
Chapter 5: Marguerite
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...laughs, and while it sounds “a trifle forced and hard,” the others join in. The Vicomte is standing quietly in the corner, and just as he moves to object to his... (full context)
Chapter 6: An Exquisite of ‘92
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
...“Begad!” replies Sir Percy, “who was the bold man who dared to tackle you—eh?” The Vicomte steps forward. He tells Sir Percy that his mother has insulted the lady, and he... (full context)
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Sir Percy points to the Vicomte’s sword. “What the devil is that?” he asks. “My sword, Monsieur,” he answers, confused. Sir... (full context)
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
Pride and Humility Theme Icon
The Vicomte drops his sword. “If I have done wrong, I withdraw myself,” he says. “Aye, do!”... (full context)
Chapter 11: Lord Grenville’s Ball
Social Class and the French Revolution Theme Icon
Disguise, Deception, and Dual Identity Theme Icon
...royalty amounts almost to a religion,” bows “ceremoniously.” Lady Blakeney does the same, and the Vicomte approaches. The Prince of Wales remembers meeting the Vicomte’s father, the Comte de Tournay, many... (full context)