The Sea-Wolf

by

Jack London

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The Sea-Wolf: Chapter 27 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
With good wind, Van Weyden and Maud Brewster are five days away from Japan, but if it storms hard, their small boat might not make it. Maud lets down her hair, then says that she wants to learn how to steer, since Van Weyden can’t keep steering forever without sleeping.
Van Weyden and Maud Brewster’s reliance on the wind reinforces how chance governs human life. Now that they have escaped the Ghost, Brewster and Van Weyden have their first opportunity to see what it’s like to be self-reliant.
Themes
Self-Reliance and Maturation Theme Icon
Survival of the Fittest Theme Icon
Love, Duty, and Choice Theme Icon
Van Weyden goes to sleep. When he wakes up seven hours later, he’s surprised to find that Maud Brewster has been steering the whole time. Soon, however, the wind begins to blow the wrong way, forcing them to drop anchor. Van Weyden fears that the changing winds may cause them to lose their bearings.
Like Van Weyden, Maud Brewster finds that she has strength and knowledge that she never knew about. Still, the changing winds at the end of the chapter suggest a possible end to Van Weyden and Brewster’s string of good luck.
Themes
Self-Reliance and Maturation Theme Icon
Survival of the Fittest Theme Icon
Love, Duty, and Choice Theme Icon
Quotes